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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading
This book should be essential reading for anyone in the business of commissioning or providing market research services. Written by a long time professional in the business of exploring the desires, motivations and behaviour of consumers, Philip Graves brings to the book extensive personal and professional experience. An experience which enables him to illustrate the...
Published 14 months ago by Dr. D. Lewis-hodgson

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good intro
I like the new result-driven ideas, although you can see where he's omitted the punchlines on a number of issues (so he can continue to sell them).
Published 15 months ago by Chris M


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading, 15 July 2013
This book should be essential reading for anyone in the business of commissioning or providing market research services. Written by a long time professional in the business of exploring the desires, motivations and behaviour of consumers, Philip Graves brings to the book extensive personal and professional experience. An experience which enables him to illustrate the often highly critical but always insightful observations he makes on the value of such standard market research tools as surveys and focus groups. He demonstrates that, far from adding value and providing unique insights, such investigations are often highly misleading. So misleading in fact they can lead to companies abandoning products and projects which might well have proved successful while proceeding with others that spectacularly fail.
One of the delights of his book, for both the professional and general reader, are the numerous everyday examples he provides that illustrate aspects of brain function. Everyone living in the UK can recognise a 10 note for example. But how well do we actually 'know' what such a note looks like? If you believe you do, then try answering the questions about that note Philip Graves raises. For example are the sign and the numerals in the same or different colours? Does the word 'ten' appear anywhere on the note? If so how often? How many images are on the note and what do they depict? When you check your responses against a 10 note you may well be in for a surprise!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good intro, 27 May 2013
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This review is from: Consumerology: The Truth About Consumers and the Psychology of Shopping (Kindle Edition)
I like the new result-driven ideas, although you can see where he's omitted the punchlines on a number of issues (so he can continue to sell them).
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