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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dazzling distopian tale that's highly imaginative and exciting
Taken on a thrilling adventure into the unknown, part one in the Exilon 5 trilogy is a gripping story and sensational start to a series of great premise. I was drawn to the beautiful cover of this book and the intriguing storyline, like nothing I had encountered within this genre before. Eliza Green's extraordinary, in-depth world building constructs a panoramic view of...
Published 8 months ago by Lucinda

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad.
* Please note: This is the review of a copy I purchased May 2013, and since then the author as told me she has updated it to match her much stronger writing skills to bring it in line with the proceeding series.

Without looking at the cover, the title made me wonder if the genre was a vampire (or werewolf or ghost). The cover was powerful and definitely...
Published 9 months ago by Louise Wise


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dazzling distopian tale that's highly imaginative and exciting, 24 April 2014
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Taken on a thrilling adventure into the unknown, part one in the Exilon 5 trilogy is a gripping story and sensational start to a series of great premise. I was drawn to the beautiful cover of this book and the intriguing storyline, like nothing I had encountered within this genre before. Eliza Green's extraordinary, in-depth world building constructs a panoramic view of the consequences of two worlds colliding where both sides want to win, neither trusting the other. The fusion of futuristic themes and inventive sci-fi blends together brilliantly, so as to enchant and entice fans of fantasy worlds and otherworldly concepts. Hooked from page one, BECOMING HUMAN is an impressive new novel.

Two worlds.
To species.
One terrifying secret...

A dystopian Earth forces humans to scour the galaxy for a new home.
The discovery of another race on the new planet is disrupting efforts to relocate the entire population.
The Indigenes, the race that occupies Exilon 5, must become human to protect their species from further harm.

A terrifying secret will change everything...

The post-apocalyptic, dark world sent shivers down my spine as I contemplated the aftermath of a great cataclysm affecting Earth's population. Considering having to relocate the entire human race to another planet is something of such magnitude, I was unavoidably moved by the poignancy of the thought-provoking narrative. In such a highly competitive genre I felt that this debut certainly stood-out, and that the author's uniquely identifiable writing style and creative flair would capture the minds of many. Hauntingly evocative and greatly impacting this story touched me inwardly and left me shaken to the core, meditating on the characters vast journey.

Fans of darkly delicious tales that are well crafted and brilliantly realized, will find this highly readable novel an astonishing read. I am henceforth looking forward to reading the next instalment within this fantastic series!

4.5 Stars

*I would like to thank the author for providing me with a copy of book 1 in the Exilon trilogy to read & review*
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars science fiction or could this happen?, 8 May 2014
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I like to give a book 100 pages and if I don't like it - I just get rid - life's too short .I have to say I struggled to stay with this for the 100 but my patience was rewarded in the end.If you allow the author the time to describe this new and strange world you soon begin to realise how very plausible this future may be. The characters (including the Indigenes) are well developed and as the story moves on you are rooting for at least two of them. The pace picks up in the second half of the book and you breathlessly put it down at the end, not entirely sated but then you have been warned - it is a trilogy and you will just have to read the next book
Minor irritants: The boy Ben? his character is by the look of things a mere tool to explain how humans appear to these Indigenes Fair enough but the author I think has lost an opportunity here to develop a sympathetic character The author also tends to stop the action at inappropriate times to explain or give background information and I found myself tempted to jump a few paragraphs
This then to sum up it was a very good and insightful read and I look forward to the next part of this trilogy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Human V Alien, 21 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Becoming Human by Eliza Green, is a powerful tale. I was glued to it by the time I finished the prologue!

Alien space vehicles terraform a planet. For humans of a dying Earth, to occupy this New Earth the indigenous species must die. The Indigene survivors find refuge underground ... to plot revenge on the murderous Surface Creatures.

Humans and Aliens – how very different, yet how much alike as they fight for survival.

Just what is the terrifying secret that must be hidden, but which needs to be discovered? The deep, dark secret that underlies the New Earth colonisation?

I defy any reader to experience anything but tingling tension as they read this totally absorbing futuristic hi-energy novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad., 22 Mar 2014
By 
Louise Wise (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
* Please note: This is the review of a copy I purchased May 2013, and since then the author as told me she has updated it to match her much stronger writing skills to bring it in line with the proceeding series.

Without looking at the cover, the title made me wonder if the genre was a vampire (or werewolf or ghost). The cover was powerful and definitely eye-catching but didn't match what the blurb said at first glance: polluted and overcrowded Earth. The road leading to the high-rise buildings looks very lonely, but maybe this wasn't earth? Anything that makes you stop and wonder is a good thing. Becoming Human is clearly a science fiction book and I'm quite keen to begin reading.

The opening blurb was amazing: Two worlds. Two species. One terrifying secret. Exciting! It went on to describe the book in a straight-forward way that was professional and interesting.

The look inside opened to the prologue and it was hard stay interested, and I must admit, I scrolled forward to the meat of the story. In chapter one I was introduced to Bill Taggart, the main character of the book, but back story had me scrolling forward again. Not a good sign.

After chapter one I'm taken into the POV of one of the aliens, bizarrely called the very human name of Simon, but I feel a connection with this alien (he is a species called Indigenes). His race feels like the 'underdog' from the beginning and together with the name: indi-genes, I already think I know the outcome. Can't wait to find out if I'm right! I buy the book...

But then comes chapter three and I'm taken into the POV of another character, and not until chapter eight am I back with the lead character Bill. Whose story is this? With so many characters I'm having trouble connecting with any of them! The main character's chapters (Bill) seems to be pure back story, the others are full of explanations of new technology so I'm really struggling.

The child, Ben (Bill and Ben, two similar names that is normally a no-no in writing) doesn't ring true. I can't engage with him and can't possibly imagine an eight year old out alone on his own with these 'dangerous' aliens running free. But then the child doesn't feature again after appearing in two chapters--not in this book anyway.

There was one person I warmed to out of all the characters in this book and that's a character called Laura. She's living on the over-populated earth and the author really does well in making the future earth sound like a horrible place to be. Laura gains some potentially dangerous information about the main character Bill Taggart and struggles with what to do with it (the govt. has evolved to be very mysterious and harsh). I'm lost though. The reader isn't told what this information is, only that Laura is worried. I also don't know why Stephen and the other aliens have gone to earth, or why they thought befriending a child would give them the necessary leads to get them there, neither do I know why, if all Stephen wanted was Taggart's help, is why he went to Earth (when Taggart was on Exilon 5), only to find Laura Hamilton so she could approach Taggart on their behalf.

Then I find out that the Indigenes are highly intelligent (much higher IQ than humans) so again the above makes no sense.

Two chapters from the end the story picks up, and my theory was correct. Becoming Human could potentially be a brilliant book and I wonder if the author grew into the series as the time went on?

The ending wasn't concluded, but I think it ended at the right time, and the entire series will need to be read to get a better understanding of Exilon 5 and its inhabitants.

There were no grammar or spelling issues, but a strong edit for redundant characters, POV control and a back story tidy is recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eagerly expecting a continuation of this well-conceived story, 16 Feb 2014
‘Becoming Human’ written by Eliza Green is the first installment of her The Exilon 5 Trilogy, an exciting science fiction dystopia that speaks about human not too distant future.

150 years into the future our planet is over-populated and unsuitable for life, therefore Earthlings must seek a new place to live on. Exoplanet Exilon 5 will be found, a perfect place for a continuation of human civilization with only one flaw – it is already populated by another species. A human logic is simple, domestic culture will have to submit to strong newcomers and adapt, or they will have to die out for planet to become suitable for humans. There is also a third option, as was commonly imagined in some novels from the past that described our planet’s siege by some strong aliens – to hide, learn and seek way to beat the unwanted newcomers.

A reader will meet Bill Taggert who is an International Task Force Agent, responsible for investigation of this new race that is called Indigenes. Besides work, Bill has strong private motives for his investigation because of the disappearance and probable murder of his wife by the Indigenes.
His investigation will be focused on the Indigene named Stephen, but the attempt to capture him will fail. In same time, the other main protagonist, Laura who works on security job position at Earth Security Center will become familiar with the contents of one confidential document for which she will be drawn into the great conspiracy that reaches to the very top of human government.

The reader will find out that there are many secrets that are apparently hidden from the human population, and the plot of the first part of trilogy ends in a way that actually prepares readers to all the excitement that is yet to come...

Eliza Green with the first part of her trilogy manages to make an excellent introduction to all that follows in the other installments – she provides an excellent background for the whole story, she introduces us to the main characters and sets the stage for story continuation.
What could some readers object is the extremely sudden ending of the first novel action that invites reader to continue reading the sequels, but it is many times lately seen scenario in which the authors ensure reading of the novel installments.

Her book will be an excellent choice for all fans of SF, and especially dystopias because the world that is conjured up in her pages just like her characters are very believable. Therefore I can say that I’m eagerly expecting a continuation of this well-conceived story…
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good read. Recommended, 3 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Book Review: Becoming Human by Eliza Green
Reviewed by J Bryden Lloyd

Writing Style - 4.0/5.0 (Very Good)
A good, dramatic undertone and a nicely balanced narrative combine to make this a good read. The structure of the writing is simple and effective, the dialogue good and considered.
I did feel that the early chapters were a little bouncy and I worried that the story might move along too rapidly, but as the plots calmed down, it started to run a lot more smoothly.

Character Development - 4.0/5.0 (Very Good)
I struggled to relate to any of the characters at the beginning. Although I was given the ammunition needed to understand, I didn't think this was enough.
Until the story started to unfold properly, it seemed that many of them remained as little more than two-dimensional characters, who were interesting but little more.
As more of the plots and sub-plots are revealed, this does change and the characters begin to get more rounded.
If anything, it seems that more work goes into developing the `alien' characters than any others, though this does pay off later.

Descriptive - 3.5/5.0 (Good)
There is plenty of good descriptive work here, especially with regards to locations and characters. What is occasionally lacking is some of the finer, atmospheric descriptive that helps set the scene.
When it is there, it makes a huge difference to the feel of the characters.

Language & Grammar - 4.0/5.0 (Very Good)
I thought the word choices and usage were excellent. The book as a whole was very readable, and although I felt it could have done with a tiny check through on the punctuation front, there was nothing in here that was drastically in need of change or editing.
It was nice not to be bombarded with technical stuff, and to be able to just read, but at the same time, a little embellishment of the how's and why's would have helped with understanding relative distances between planets, etc.

Plot - 4.5/5.0 (Excellent) - VERY MINOR SPOILERS
This is a very good central plot, but equally, the subterfuge and twists in the various sub-plots drive some nice suspense into the story.
Clear lines become drawn, and although some details remain necessarily hazy, the plots do begin to get a little clearer as this part reaches an excellent conclusion.
Early in the piece, the meetings between the boy and the alien are central to the story, though its only later that it becomes clear why. Although you learn little of the reasons, the more draconian society on Earth makes the plot-lines based there much better.

General - 4.0/5.0 (Very Good)
This was good from the start... yes, a little jerky at the beginning, but the story was worth the effort.
This is one of those books with a great deal of promise and the possibility it will go somewhere as a series. At the very least, I hope the sequel is as good as this.
Definite 4 stars. Recommended for sci-fi and adventure readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read - Exilon 5, 14 May 2013
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Imagine a world, 150 years from now, without wars, reigned by a single World Government, where global warming is a thing of the past and food comes from machines called replicators.
Nice, huh?

Unfortunately this world is inhabited by 20 billion people, the World Government is corrupt, sunlight hardly reaches the surface anymore making it cold as hell, and the air is only breathable through filter-masks filled with some gel.
Not so nice anymore.

Fortunately there is another planet just 2 weeks travel time from Earth, that looks promising to be occupied by mankind. A terra-forming process turned this planet (Exilon-5) to a real neat place, new cities have been laid out and people on Earth are just craving to live there.
Splendid!

Unfortunately there is another race, the Indigenes, who have been living on the planet before men arrived. Most of them died during the terra-forming, but some have survived and were driven underground 30 years ago. Now there's some kind of cold-war going on between the Indigenes and the World Gov. Each side has its own agenda and is desperately trying to find out as much information as possible about the other race.

That's about the state of affairs when the book starts.

We follow people from Earth and Exilon-5 on their respective paths, both Humans and Indigenes, some know what's going on, some don't, and some only think they know. Of course paths cross on occasion and that's when things get really interesting.

For me the whole book was interesting. First of all I like dystopian stories. I have read 1984 by George Orwell a couple of times in several languages (well, two actually). In this book we have a lot of orwellesque overtones, a 1984-ish bouquet if you will (pardon my French). Then there are some were fitting witty dialog scenes the main characters have with some secondary ones (military people, co-workers, people from the street). I love this kind of stuff. Sometimes the smallest details just make a good story for me.

Then there is the Sci-Fi stuff. I'm glad the book is not overloaded with that. It's all nice and well, but I think too much tech stuff could ruin a story, which is not the case here. If you are a Star-Trek fan (like me) you'll have your familiar food replicators, force fields and turbo-lifts, although they're probably different from the Star-Trek universe. You have some spacecrafts flying around, artificial skin, breathing filters, "DPads", Light-Boxes and surveillance s*** equipment, but that's about all. No ludicrous deus-ex-machina-gadget that help to get heroes out of trouble.

Finally the main characters. I admit there are a few of them you should pay attention to. Some reviews complain that there are too many people to follow and that it's hard to keep track of everyone. That may be true, but since I've read those reviews beforehand I just kept my own little dramatis personæ (handwritten, mind you!) and then it was no big deal at all.

Reading this book was an overall pleasant experience. Considering the fact that this is a debut novel, the five stars are very much deserved.

I'm looking forward to the sequel, called ALTERED REALITY, which will be published later this year.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting tale., 20 April 2014
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This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
This is the first book I have read by this Eliza Green. I must admit I've not read a sci-fi novel for a while, so this made a refreshing change. The cover is just beautiful, very eye-catching. I enjoyed the story and was eager to find out what the huge secret was. Lots of characters (some I really disliked so they were written well!), lots of POV, and an interesting tale. There are plenty of questions left at the end which make me want to read the next book in the series, although there was a huge revelation that left me satisfied. I'll look forward to reading the next book as I particularly want to know more about Bill, and Laura, and Stephen, and Anton, oh ... about all of them!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent starter, 16 Sep 2013
By 
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I won this on the authors blog and have just finished reading it! Boy it's good. It's a great story so far and I'm loving the concept. I wonder how it's going to pan out over the next 2 books.
It ended in just the right spot.
I would have like it to be a little more descriptive as I like to have the images in my mind of the surroundings etc whilst reading. However having said that, I had a hard job putting it down and can't wait for the next installment. That's the downside of Trilogies you have to wait for the next installment.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A human story in an inhuman setting, 5 Aug 2013
By 
Alison Morton (France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Becoming Human (The Exilon 5 Trilogy Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
An enjoyable read with an intriguing story which really held my attention until the end. I liked the way the story unfolded for both the reader and the characters. I felt there was a little too much straight exposition, which sometimes put a break on the action, but we soon got back in the story afterwards. As the story entered the third part, it really picked up pace.

Ms Green has taken a great deal of care to describe locations, people and thought processes. She obviously knows modern office life!

Bill Taggart is very engaging, although he does drink coffee rather too much than is good for him. The complexity of Stephen's thought process make him a very sympathetic character, especially when he has to handle the revelation about himself and the other Indigenes.

Yes, there are spacecraft, surveillance and forcefields, but this story is, as the title suggests, about human beings dealing with both their personal dilemmas and a horrendous discovery about their society.

I would like to have seen more of the scenes handled through dialogue, but I'm a dialogue junkie!

The multiple storylines and points of view push the plot along inexorably. This is what Tom Clancy does very successfully and Ms Green pulls it off here.

When is the next part coming out?
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