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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The leftovers collection
Now that the Doctor Who dvds are nearly all out, this is a collection of bits and pieces that couldn't have been put on any other dvd release. Shada is the legendary unfinished Douglas Adams story that would have been broadcast in early 1980 if not for a strike. As some other reviews have said this boxset is really just a boxset of extras but there is still a lot to...
Published 23 months ago by Mr. R. W. Graham

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76 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Just A Collection Of Extras
Really nothing to get excited about here. This is definitely one for the die-hard collectors... People like me! I don't want to put people off buying this but, then I don't particularly have many positive things to say about it either. Those of you who are old enough to have watched and possibly collected the old Doctor Who VHS range and watched the sporadic 1990s...
Published 24 months ago by MV


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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The leftovers collection, 18 Jan 2013
By 
Mr. R. W. Graham (Lincoln, U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Now that the Doctor Who dvds are nearly all out, this is a collection of bits and pieces that couldn't have been put on any other dvd release. Shada is the legendary unfinished Douglas Adams story that would have been broadcast in early 1980 if not for a strike. As some other reviews have said this boxset is really just a boxset of extras but there is still a lot to enjoy. Shada is barking mad and a lot of fun, seeing The Doctor and Romana and K9 in Cambridge visiting a mad old Cambridge proffessor who also happens to be a retired Time Lord who has misplaced a book that has the secrets of lost Time Lord prison Shada that an evil alien is after. Tom Baker provides linking material describing unfilmed scenes well and from the look of it Shada could have been a classic Tom Baker story if finished and broadcast as planned and there is also an animated finished version starring Paul Mcgann's 8th Doctor avaliable as well though you can only watch on PC format the animation is poor but story good fun and McGann proves as he has for Big Finish audios that he would have made a great Doctor if given a chance. More Than 30 Years In The Tardis is the 30th anniversary documentary very enjoyable with contributions from various past Doctors and companions. Definately a boxset for the die hard fans and completists only but very enjoyable if you decide to take a chance on it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Exciting, 15 Oct 2013
By 
E. Higgs "browngoose" (england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
This is a great value box set with two versions of Shada and a classic documentary. Its a great shame shada was never competed as it could easily have been one of the best Tom baker stories. What I didn't realize was that the animated version cannot be played through the DVD player, only a computer.
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76 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Just A Collection Of Extras, 2 Jan 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Really nothing to get excited about here. This is definitely one for the die-hard collectors... People like me! I don't want to put people off buying this but, then I don't particularly have many positive things to say about it either. Those of you who are old enough to have watched and possibly collected the old Doctor Who VHS range and watched the sporadic 1990s celebrations and screenings on the BBC will know more or less what this product is. For the younger Doctor Who enthusiasts and the people who didn't get to buy these oddities the first time around, let me fill you in. 'Shada' is an incomplete Tom Baker story. Only location footage and a small amount of studio footage was shot for the story before production was cancelled due to a BBC strike. The story was never finished and left in the archives until the early 1990s when it was released on VHS with Tom Baker linking the significant gaps between scenes with on-screen narration. I never felt satisfied with this presentation. You do get an idea of what's supposed to be happening during the story but, there is very little to keep you engaged. After one viewing, it becomes something tedious and a bit of a disappointment. However, it does have historical interest in that you actually get to see a Doctor Who story that was never broadcast. Despite being revisited by the BBC last decade and remade as an audio adventure with a new cast and accompanying minimal animation for viewing and listening on the BBC web site only (which I believe is included here in DVD ROM format) the story is still - if not more confusing than ever.

'More Than 30 Years In The Tardis' is the 30th Anniversary BBC Celebration Documentary, broadcast on the BBC in 1993 but with additional material not included in the original broadcast which had the title '30 Years In The Tardis', hence the addition of 'More Than' to the title. Have you ever seen any of the special features on a classic Doctor Who DVD, particularly the more meaty and lengthy documentaries about the show? Yes? Well this documentary is a lot like those. No? Well basically it's a Doctor Who 'Memories of Greatest Moments with Recollections of "How It Was Made"' featuring lots of classic clips inter-cut with an enormous amount of 'Talking Heads', People who acted in the series, relatives of people who acted in the series, production crew and celebrity fans of the show (who were never in it)giving us plenty of memories of watching the show and how they felt about it at the time. That's all really. I think the documentary was only really produced to promote the fact that the BBC Videos were available to buy. It was basically a nostalgic look back at a TV programme that started production 30 years earlier, finished production in 1989 - leaving our screens without a bang, not even a whimper, just fading away and with every year, leaving fans becoming increasingly concerned that it was something that was never coming back to our TV screens. From recollection, I don't think anyone who has ever bought a classic Doctor Who DVD in the past 13 years will learn anything or much they didn't already know - or haven't heard several times already. 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who, starting the year off with an out-dated 20 year-old documentary seems a bit odd. I really enjoyed this documentary for a few years, but that was 20 years ago. I have never seen any point in watching it over the past 10 years or more since the introduction of special feature documentaries on DVDs that deconstruct and analyze every aspect of the show right down the the very thought patterns in the heads and the glue in the hands of the people making and producing the show.

Basically, these two features deserve nothing more than 'Bonus Feature' status. Individually, they could (and should) have been tacked on to previous proper Doctor Who DVD releases. There you have it; and here it is... If you want it for the sake of being a completist or if you're such a fan of the show that you want every single piece of footage in existence that relates to the show in as high a quality as possible.

If you're a casual viewer who enjoys watching the occasional engaging and entertaining classic Doctor Who Story - best start looking for another title and give this one a miss for the time being.

If you're looking for a gift for a cash-strapped Doctor Who fan, best to ask first before buying this, it won't be appreciated by someone you don't know well enough. However, it would make an ideal gift for a fan that has possibly put it on their wish list but have more important things to spend their own money on until they can afford and be bothered to buy this. I've bought every classic Doctor who DVD release on the day of release for the past 13 years, but this time, for the first time, I think I'll just wait a while - it's really not a priority purchase right now, even as a long-time Doctor Who fan who buys every release.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Off-Cuts Collection, 21 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Now then, the debate of the century {not really but it feels like it at times} has been the un-inclusion of the £25,000 Ian Levine Shada animation. The forums and the fans that dwell within them have been set alight by this most gravest of tragedys. But for all my salt as a fan of Doctor Who, I just could not care less. Having finally gotten fed up of peoples bias opinions on the matter I finally went and read in detail the reasons behind it's non-inclusion. And in the end, it was never going to work so why on earth put so much effort into giving yourself a heart attack. I found out that Ian went ahead and spent 25k without proir agreement with the beeb or any sort of assurance that it would be professionally released. Hmmm...

Shada is a story that I have never been enamoured with, it was a product of it's time, mainly the disastrous 17th season and final year of Graham Williams tenure. Nearly all the stories that year were below par, save for City of Death. Shada, for me anyway, would have just been the icing on the cake. I have viewed the VHS version {and thusly the DVD version because that's all that is included, yes, a VHS to DVD straight copy!!! {with restoration of course}} many times and it just never grabs me. I suppose that is in part due to the fact that it is only half complete, but even if it was complete, I would have never been one of it's supporters. Don't get me wrong, I would have loved to have seen Ian's complete version included on this DVD, if only for something new to try and tempt me towards liking this so called "lost classic". But hey, since it's not going to happen, I'll just have to stick to the VHS version and thusly my disagreeable opinion of it.

Either way, you are probably wondering why I have given this DVD review a 5 star rating. I can assure you Amazon reader that it is not because of my undying love of Shada, as you have probably gathered, but because of it's other lesser-known brother in this boxed set, More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS. What a great and self-indulgent documentary this is. A great piece, created way back in 1993/4 that had every fan reaching for the Video remote to record BBC2. I first saw this doco when I was still wet behind the ears concerning Doctor Who, and this doco made me think of Who as one of the greatest TV programmes of the era, if not ever. And how right was I to think thus so. Doctor Who from then on with the aid of Jon Pertwee repeats on UKGold was a mainstay in my TV viewing and that has not changed for more than 12 years. This doco was a small part of my destiny to become an avid viewer of Doctor Who.

The boxed set is rounded off with a series of documentaries and featurettes that evidently could not be fitted onto other DVD's coming out next year. Still, the oddness of their inclusion only adds to the enjoyment of this DVD and I think, it all makes for one hell of a start to next years fabulous release schedule and the end of the greatest collection of DVD's in the history of the world.

Many thanks for reading my review. It's greatly appreciated.

M.B.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From the vaults, 17 Feb 2013
By 
Paul Tapner (poole dorset england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
A box set containing two Doctor Who DVDS, both in individual boxes themselves, that are reissues of things that came on out on VHS back almost twenty years ago.

First is Shada. The legendary lost 'classic' of the old show. A six part story written to finish off Tom Baker's sixth year. It would have been the last for the producer and script editor of the time. The latter being Douglas Adams of Hitchhiker's guide fame. Who also wrote Shada. Shada sees the Fourth Doctor and Romana visit Cambridge to see an old friend. Only to find that said friend is in possession of a secret that mad scientist Skagra needs in order to further his quest for universal domination. The location of the legendary prison planet of the Time Lords...

Shada was never completed because of a strike at the BBC. For years after, it attained cult status amongst fans simply because it was a story we'd never seen, therefore it was bound to be great. A couple of clips from it were used in 'the Five Doctors.' Then the BBC finally put the whole thing together, using all the footage that was produced and various visual effects, plus linking narration from Tom Baker in character. Said character being the actor called Tom Baker who used to play the Doctor.

Then we discovered what Douglas Adams. Shada wasn't actually that good.

Shada actually is somewhat better than that assessment. But Doctor Who stories of the time that ran to six parts did so by necessity to fill out the required two extra episodes. So it does feel stretched. The bigger problem though is that whilst there's a lot of footage and only occasional narration early on, as the episodes go by, there's less footage and lots more narration. It just feels that you hardly get much of the former.

It really remains a fascinating glimpse at what could have been.

The DVD is a straight reissue of the VHS version, albeit with some cleaning up of visual effects.

However, as an extra, you do get an online version of the story that was done over a decade later. Which has Paul McGann as the eighth Doctor and Lalla Ward as a somewhat older Romana in the story. This is a full cast audio drama which was broadcast online using flash animation for the visuals. This version is accessible by putting the disc onto a computer and opening up the files. The flash animation is very basic. The opening scene is pretty clever in how it gets the Eighth Doctor into the story, and also explains the use of the the clips in the Five Doctors. But beyond that the script is much the same. Thus it's the same as the cd soundtrack of this version that came out a while back, but it's a more complete version of the story in many ways.

The dvd has the following language and subtitle options:

Languages: English.

Subtitles: English.

It's also English audio captioned.

It has the usual extras for this range of:

Photo gallery.

Production information subtitles.

Coming soon trailer. [as ever with flashing images].

Plus several documentaries:

Taken out of time. All about Shada, this runs for twenty five minutes. Is very informative. Has lovely Cambridge locations. And Tom Baker walking his dog. So it's well worth a watch.

Strike! Strike! Strike! is roughly thirty minutes long and all about how strikes affected the show down the years. This is a fascinating trip down memory lane for those of a certain age with some great old footage. It's also well worth a look.

Now and then: runs just under ten minutes and compares the Cambridge locations for the story as they are now to as they were in 1979. Some great scenery makes this a good watch.

Being a girl runs for twenty five minutes and looks at how the show has treated female characters down the years. It's not entirely sure what point it's trying to make but it's a watchable production.

The other release in this box set is More than Thirty years in the TARDIS. Back in 1993, the BBC broadcast a documentary to mark the show's thirtieth anniversary. But a lot was cut from it for timing reasons. A VHS version came out with all the cut bits reinstated. This is a reissue of that VHS version. It could be a very out of date programme now but it does remain an excellent piece of work, with reconstructions of key scenes, excellent interviews, and some good presentation. It is still one of the best documentaries made about the show.

This has the same language and subtitle options as Shada, plus the photo gallery, coming soon trailer and production infromation subtitles.

For an easter egg, press the down key on the dvd remote till the menu gets to photo gallery, then press left then press play. For a short snippet from an interview with Director Richard Martin about his professional relationship with producer Verity Lambert. It's worth a watch.

Extras on this dvd are:

Remembering Nicholas Courtney. A twenty five minute long tribute to the actor who played the Brigadier. It uses footage from an unfinished 2010 interview where he was clearly in poor health, but these sections do contain a big surprise. So their inclusion is justified. Beyond that it is a fine tribute, with some classic archival footage from other shows you might have never expected to see again.

Doctor who stories. More interviews recorded for 2003's the story of Doctor Who, with first Doctor companion Peter Purves and original producer Verity Lambert. Running fourteen and ten minutes each both are very good interviewees and these are good viewing.

Those deadly divas is a twenty five minute long feature [approx] about some of the stronger female characters on the show down the years. With contributions from many of the actresses in question, it's a lively and entertaining production.

These are not two of the most essential dvds in the range, but both offer some good viewing, and the whole collection is overall worth getting.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 11 July 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
this was a very good dvd as it had extra footage not shown on original broadcast
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3.0 out of 5 stars Completing collection?, 30 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Not the most obvious pairing but useful for the completist. Good to have both the unfinished original and the Big Finish version of 'Shada' and the documentary was a useful summary of the state of play when it was made.
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3.0 out of 5 stars never seen until now, 28 Feb 2014
By 
fad (south shields) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
a lot of people will disagree with me, but I thought this story has been overhyped like most of the modern doctor who's and various movies that are out their. the acting was pretty poor in my opinion not like the usual standard of tom bakers and the story in principle was a great idea but the story just lacked something that I cant quite put my finger on, maybe it was the poorer acting or special effects I just don't know. on the plus side at least I finally managed to see the show at long last.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, 27 Sep 2013
This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Because of a strike at the BBC, Shada was never fully produced, which is a real shame. The story was written by Douglas Adams who brought us The HickHikers Guide To The Galaxy and in Doctor Who he brought us City of Death. On the DVD we get all the footage along with narration from Tom Baker of the scenes that were never filmed. Personally I really enjoyed this story more than City of Death.
More Than 30 Years in the TARDIS is the documentary about Doctor Who produced in 1993 for the 30th anniversary of the show. I found this very interesting. It is worth watching if you are a fan of the classic series of the show.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Shada should've shone, 30 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who: The Legacy Collection (Shada/More Than 30 Years In The TARDIS) [DVD] (DVD)
Would have been 4 stars except the remade Shada with Paul McGann is only included as flash files meaning you cannot watch them through your DVD player - and that's a real shame because it is a real cracker.
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