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First Sentence: The first of the murders which so shook the Cathedral passed with little comment.

Sir Baldwin Furnshill, Keeper of the King's Peace, and his wife Jeannie, travel to Exeter, meeting up with their friend Bailiff Simon Puttock. The two men have been summoned to receive jeweled gloves in recognition of their service.

They arrive to find Ralph, the glove maker, has been murdered and his apprentice is in jail. Neither Furnshill nor Simon believes he's guilty. When a Secondary at the cathedral dies of poisoning during a service, the city Coroner asks Furnshill and Baldwin to find who's behind the deaths.

Since I'm reading one book each month in this series, I'll be inclined to repeat myself. But some things bear repeating.

From the glossary, through information on the Regulations for the Boy-Bishop at Exeter Cathedral after Bishop Grandisson c 1130 (translated from the Latin by Margaret Cash), the Cast of Characters and the Author's Notes, you know this is a very well researched book and series. But where this could cause a book to be dry, Jecks uses that information to create a strong, rich sense of time and place.

The beginning of the book is wonderfully visual. It is almost as if one is watching a drawing evolve, one detail at a time. Jecks' plots always have a number of threads and twists. In this book, I did feel the ending was very abrupt.

It does take a bit to keep up with the characters at time--hence, the Cast of Characters--but it is so well worth it. One thing I have noticed is that Jecks has changed the character and relationship of the two men, a bit, in a way I don't' particularly care for and the bantering dialogue between them has suffered for it.

However, even for the small flaws, I found myself reading straight through and looking forward to the next book.
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on 2 October 2014
struggle to come to terms with so many characters thrown into the story, that leaves you somewhat confused at the beginning that you have to keep referring to whose, who.
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on 20 September 2013
Happy to recommend to anyone who enjoys historical who dunnits. Well written and have now acquired all the kindle books.
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on 22 March 2014
Micheal Jecks is a really good writer and as I live in the area he writes about I love the history of it.
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on 26 May 2015
As always with this series, a cracking good read, lots of red herrings and a world richly described.
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on 8 April 2013
I always wanted some of these books and I enjoy reading them as one of my books or my kindle.
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on 27 November 2001
I read this book following a book by Bernard Knight (Tinner's Corpse). I must say that I prefer this one because the plot was more complex and there were more twists. In fact, I found the book so engrossing that I finished it in one night. That's because it was very good !
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on 22 June 2015
interesting to find out details about how things worked in days gone by.
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on 8 July 2012
Another excellent book by Michael Jecks, a mystery till the very end,as usual I was blaming all the wrong suspects. Recommended for anyone who likes historical detective stories.
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on 15 February 2001
Excellent! I highly recommend this one, and there are nine previous books about the same two sleuths to enjoy.
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