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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thought provoking and well written
I have long been a fan of Danny Dorling's maps and it should come as no surprise that someone with such an innovative intelligent way of encouragaing us to look at the whole world can get us thinking about how life chances vary so much in a small area - along the Central line's 32 stops. Danny writes with a compasssion and humour that makes this book a must for anyone who...
Published 19 months ago by Kate Amis

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3.0 out of 5 stars From West to East.
This book examines how a whole range of “social indicators” – such as life expectancy and GCSE results – vary as you travel along London’s central line.

This is a rail line that runs in an arc from West to East through London. Taken as a (presumably mythical) journey over a single day, the aspects of life that vary along the line...
Published 2 months ago by Stewart M


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3.0 out of 5 stars From West to East., 26 Aug 2014
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Stewart M (Victoria, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This book examines how a whole range of “social indicators” – such as life expectancy and GCSE results – vary as you travel along London’s central line.

This is a rail line that runs in an arc from West to East through London. Taken as a (presumably mythical) journey over a single day, the aspects of life that vary along the line – and often between stops are looked at in two ways!

Firstly they are illustrated by dialogues between people who live in the area of the relevant tube station and secondly by brief reference to actual statistics.

I had a small problem with both of these – in the dialogues I did loose track a couple of times (no pun intended!) and felt like I was just ploughing on to find out what was going on.

The issue with the statistics is that the author admits that a few random events can alter the average of some of these values significantly for one year – in other words the stark differences between one place and another could actually be due to chance – but then never seems to tell us what time periods the statistics represent. If the statistics are long-term averages, they probably represent real difference – but the way they are presented leaves this open to question.

Now, I am not some form of stats geek – but I do know my way around a graph and I have to say I found this element of the book disappointing.

Equally, this is not to say that I did not enjoy reading the book – but I just kept having a little nagging question popping up at the back of my mind!

Recommended (just).
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thought provoking and well written, 12 Mar 2013
I have long been a fan of Danny Dorling's maps and it should come as no surprise that someone with such an innovative intelligent way of encouragaing us to look at the whole world can get us thinking about how life chances vary so much in a small area - along the Central line's 32 stops. Danny writes with a compasssion and humour that makes this book a must for anyone who enjoys good writing - treat yourself to a ride on the tube- (the book is cheaper than the single tube fare) and you will be at the end of this compact book before you get to Theydon Bois!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining and insightful, 15 Dec 2013
This is another enthralling volume from Penguin's series on London's Underground lines. Danny Dorling offers up a series of vignettes of local life set in the area immediately surrounding each station on the Central Line (the bright red one from the map), and then compares various aspects of the socio-economic data from the census. This provides a fascinating insight into the manner in which adjacent communities differ, and how life expectancy can vary markedly between two communities that are just a couple of miles apart,.

Dorling looks at a wide range of comparators such as GCSE results, lie expectancy and average income as well as a selection of health-based statistics. My description of this is probably doing the book a dreadful disservice as it probably sounds very dry, but the book is actually completely engrossing. I would welcome the same sort of analysis across some of the other lines, and maybe of the wards and boroughs that the M25 passes through I accept that I am a bit of a geek!
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4.0 out of 5 stars All abroad, 2 Oct 2014
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An easy read when on the underground or train! Danny Dorling takes the statistics, combines them with a bit of mapping but the masterstroke is then telling the stories of several people along the line. The result is a very clear demonstration of the effects of inequality on everyday life. Recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Nice, sharp little pamphlet about the social economic geography of London, 6 May 2014
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Illustrated by the progress of the Central Line from West to East, and with lots of little pen-portraits of the people who live around in each stop. What a good writer Danny Dorling is! Especially for an academic.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 27 Dec 2013
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Stats, facts and graphs of the people who live above and beside the Central Line. An interesting tale of rich and poor London.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars fascinating, 20 May 2013
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This review is from: The 32 Stops: The Central Line (Penguin Underground Lines) (Kindle Edition)
A really interesting book looking at the social and economic changes as you travel along the Central Line, who would have thought that life-expectancy (for example) would vary so much in the distance between a couple of tube stops. Thought-provoking.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Facts from a social geographer., 29 April 2013
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Barbara Young - See all my reviews
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Another varied version of these Underground books. This time the author makes comparisons about the lives and social standing of the inhabitants of the various stations along the route, pointing out that poverty can be so different within two miles!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The 32 Stops, 17 Jun 2013
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It is really interesting and useful. I am going to use this book as a reference for my maths course work
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 1 Oct 2014
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David E. White (london uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The 32 Stops: The Central Line (Penguin Underground Lines) (Kindle Edition)
Quirky social comment, spot on!
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