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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific
The premise of this novel may sound like it's heading for a fairly standard murder story, but the novel quickly takes off in pleasingly unexpected directions.

Janusz, an unofficial 'fixer' for many of London's Polish community, gets embroiled in a murder investigation while trying to track down a missing girl. Janusz is a terrific, curiously believable...
Published on 1 Jan 2012 by GW

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow at times
I found the story a bit slow and sometimes found myself skimming through just to get to a end of a chapter. Although i guessed a lot of what was about to come, the ending did manage to surprise me.
Published on 17 April 2012 by J. Moore


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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific, 1 Jan 2012
By 
GW (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
The premise of this novel may sound like it's heading for a fairly standard murder story, but the novel quickly takes off in pleasingly unexpected directions.

Janusz, an unofficial 'fixer' for many of London's Polish community, gets embroiled in a murder investigation while trying to track down a missing girl. Janusz is a terrific, curiously believable character; he has been in the UK for years, since long before there was a Polski sklep on every city high street, and he brings an interesting perspective to the story - often torn between seeing things as an immigrant and a native. Janusz's investigations eventually lead him back to Poland, where we get a glimpse of the country through his eyes, an native returning after a long-absence, even seen as something of an outsider by many of the solid old-timers.

Janusz shares the novel with Natalie Kershaw, a young Met. detective She is a woman trying to make it in the still male-dominated police force, but this isn't hammered home to the point of cliché; rather than consciously rebelling, Natalie reacts with a very relatable frustration. And although she inevitably gets into trouble for not following all the rules, it's not in one of the overly-dramatic ways beloved by the heroes of police procedurals.

Commendably, the novel doesn't shy away from big themes, and manages to address them without the use of a shoehorn. Religion is tackled naturally through Janusz's ingrained Catholicism, which he maintains more as an obligation (although he often makes use of the confessional). Opposing forms of the faith are represented by Janusz's pestering, well-connected priest and the obstructive, shady principal of a Catholic theology college. Dodgy politics also enters into matters.

The fluent naturalism of the prose is reminiscent of Ian Rankin, as are the shots of humour. The interactions among the police officers are particularly well-drawn, most notably Natalie's surprisingly touching relationship with her old-school sergeant.

The police story is well-researched and well-paced, but Janusz steals the show. It's great to see immigration and multiculturalism tackled from the other side of the mirror, something I've certainly not seen in a mainstream British novel of late, and probably (and very sadly) the reason the book was unable to find a UK publisher. Fortunately, the Kindle revolution can help out with that.

'Where the Devil Can't Go' is an excellent crime novel: an unpredictable but uncontrived plot, gritty without being gratuitous, and well-drawn characters you want to spend time with. And I even learnt a bit of Polish.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BETTER THAN RANKIN, 28 Nov 2011
A fantastic debut - shocking, surprising, wonderfully funny and utterly up to the minute. An English female detective and a Polish petty crook cum private detective cross paths as they discover the links between a dead body in the Thames, a missing woman, and political events in Poland dating back to the fall of communism in the 1980s. Anya Lipska has written a detective story/political thriller that out-Rankins Rankin. Like him she lovingly recreates a city - in this case London - which is as much a character as her people, but this is a London most readers, including Londoners, will have only glimpsed from the outside. It is the London of the vast Polish community: of young Poles working on the building sites for the Olympic Games in the East End, or doing bodged jobs on converting flats for the rich in Notting Hill Gate, of sex workers in Soho, of Polish matrons, of the straight and the ever so slightly crooked, including Lipska's wonderful hero the 'big man' Janusz, who engages in a little smuggling when he's not sorting out the Poles' problems - with a little violence if necessary. Janusz is in the mould of Rankin's Rebus, but because he straddles both sides of the law he is much more convincing as an anti-authoritarian urban knight. His nostalgia for the staider more insular London before the Poles settled there in such numbers, and his delightful friendship with reckless fellow smuggler Oskar, make him genuinely idiosyncratic and funny. Like all good heroes of detective stories, Janusz is haunted by demons - in this case linked to real life political events in Poland. Lipska's female detective Kershaw is equally well drawn - ambitious, fighting hard to overcome the chauvinism of her fellow cops though the seemingly most chauvinist of them brought tears to my eyes when he proves himself otherwise. The final denouement with Janusz fighting for his life in London's docklands is breathtaking; you're fighting with him on every page. Great book and I hope Lipska gives us another soon.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Where The Devil Can't Go--Anya Lipska, 18 Jan 2012
By 
Simon Clarke (Hackney, London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Where the Devil Can't Go
This is a very assured debut crime novel that contains all
the essential ingredients for an enjoyable thriller.
Janusz Kiszka,a Pole who has lived in London for 20 years
is asked by his priest to find a Polish waitress who has
gone missing from the capital.Meanwhile a young woman is
found dead floating in the River Thames,and shortly afterwards,
another women is discovered dead in a bed in a Docklands hotel.
As rookie Detective Constable Natalie Kershaw investigates
these deaths ,her path crosses with Kiszka,and he becomes a
suspect.As they go their own ways with their inquiries
(Kiszka to Poland),their concerns increasingly become connected.
'Where The Devil Can't Go'is an assiduously researched novel that
gives us a glimpse of the London Polish community and the murky
history of 1980's Poland.It is cleverly plotted,and provides two
fully engaging characters in Kershaw and Kiszka.
Excellent .Definitely an author to watch out for.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a surprise!, 14 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. B. P. M. Scott (Lancashire) - See all my reviews
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I recently bought this book from Amazon mainly based on the number of good reviews. Additionally I didn't want to pay too much merely hoping to get a decent read quite cheaply,as most are overpriced in my opinion.
Once I started to get into the story I was hooked.Initially I was quite surprised at such a good page turning story from a virtually unknown author could be so good.Unfortunately as I couldn't hardly stop reading this quite enthralling story,I finished it all too quickly.But certainly one of the best reads I've had for some time.Highly recommended.
I was naturally hoping to find some more books by this wonderful author,but sadly it appears this book is the only one at the present time more's the pity.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT READ, 29 Nov 2011
I ripped through this book and even missed my tube stop a couple of times because of it. Where The Devil Can't Go is set within London's Polish community and a big part of its charm comes from learning about the lives of people most of us know very little about, aside from the Polish shops, cafes and builders.

There's a historical / political component to the story and much of clearly well-researched detail woven through the book brings a subtle sense of tension.

The female main character, Natalie, is the kind of sharp, sassy lady I'd like to have as a drinking companion and the other prominent character, Janusz, initially seems like a very cool player. But as the story unfolds, they both quickly begin to quickly feel like old friends and Lipska writes their inner lives as fault-prone and darkly humorous. In fact, there is a lot of dark humour in this book.

The story has some breath-taking twists and turns, with several brilliantly drawn action scenes, told with a filmic intensity. During one, I literally couldn't turn the pages fast enough! If you like crime / thriller / mystery - or just a decent, unpretentious and entertaining read that stubbornly refuses to sit in any one genre - then give it a go...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great first novel., 30 April 2013
By 
Liz Wilkins "Lizzy11268" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Where the Devil Can't Go (A Kiszka & Kershaw Mystery) (Kindle Edition)
With her first novel, Anya Lipska has created that lovely thing - a crime novel with enough originality to make it a great read for fans of the genre. Janusz Kiszka is a Polish ex pat who has been living in London for many years. A "fixer" he is asked to track down a missing Polish girl. Meanwhile, the body of a young girl is washed up along the Thames and new officer DC Natalie Kershaw is investigating. I loved the background to this novel - giving an insight into a different culture within the UK, and some history about their roots, this is as much a political novel as anything else and I found it fascinating reading. The characters are terrific - well fleshed out and compelling, I was especially fond of Janusz - once hoping to enter the scientific community until fate intervened to give him an entirely different existence - he is a man of many sides, not all of them good. Natalie is very likeable, the interactions between the two are terrific and I hope that their relationship can be further developed in future stories. The mystery component of the book is well done, enough twists and turns to make you keep page turning, but the characterisation was the part I was most fond of. I love a book where you can really get behind the protagonists and live the story right along with them and this had that in spades. The resolution was satisfying and I will certainly be reading more from this author.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Fast Paced Thriller, 6 Jan 2012
I really enjoyed this book which was recommended to me by a friend. From about half way through I just couldn't put it down.

I found the Polish aspect fascinating - it put a real human face on the Polish community in the UK. I really liked the way the two main characters interacted but didn't become romantically involved, it made it somehow more believable. It's fast paced, well written and humorous.

I could see this ending up as a series of books and I would definitely read more of them!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real page turner, 31 Dec 2011
By 
Mrs. Caroline O'Callaghan "Caroline" (Evesham, England) - See all my reviews
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In the beginning I found the rather descriptions rather seedy but part way in this book really grabs you. The plot twists and turns taking you from London to Poland and back. It is very well written, intriguing and unusually I had not suspected the twist in the end right until it came. An excellent read a real page turner. I cannot wait for her next book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't put it down, 2 Dec 2011
Having suffered from a book fatigue I was very sceptical that I will find a novel that will break this trend, let alone a crime novel. I was pleasantly proven wrong and can't put it down. Just one small point, which although does not spoil the read, some bi-lingual readers (like myself) might pick the holes in - a couple of Polish words need to be corrected/edited.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where the Devil Can't Go, 24 Nov 2011
A fresh take on old themes, if you're a fan of crime thrillers you'll enjoy this. Impressively researched it's fascinating to get a noirish insight into London's Polish community. There are some shocking twists and appropriately complicated characters. A satisfying meaty page turner.
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