Customer Reviews


75 Reviews
5 star:
 (42)
4 star:
 (24)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great film ..... but is this really the Ultimate Edition DVD?
The Spy Who Loved Me contains some of THE iconic images from the James Bond film series - the Lotus Esprit, the skiing stunt complete with the Union Jack parachute - as well as Roger Moore in top form as our hero, James Bond. The film also has one of the great BOnd villans in Jaws, here genuinely menacing before he was reduced as a comic villan in Mookraker as well as a...
Published on 8 Aug 2006 by Twazzer

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Spy Who Loved Me, 2007 Bond Remastered Edition - Roger Moore's eyebrow battles Richard Kiel's dental ironmongery
Superspy James Bond's tenth big screen outing was BIG. With a big budget and with one of the biggest film sets ever built, it all comes together as an entertaining romp.

Bond is sent off to investigate the mysterious disappearance of nuclear submarines. The Russians have also lost a sub, and soon Bond is crossing swords with their agent triple X as well as the...
Published on 30 Aug 2010 by Victor


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great film ..... but is this really the Ultimate Edition DVD?, 8 Aug 2006
By 
Twazzer (Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Spy Who Loved Me contains some of THE iconic images from the James Bond film series - the Lotus Esprit, the skiing stunt complete with the Union Jack parachute - as well as Roger Moore in top form as our hero, James Bond. The film also has one of the great BOnd villans in Jaws, here genuinely menacing before he was reduced as a comic villan in Mookraker as well as a top quality Bond lady in Barbara Bach.

This DVD has cleaned up the original film and this copy of The Spy Who Loved Me is sparkling. However, I do have reservations in this Ultimate Edition DVD in comparing this DVD with the Special Edition release of five years ago. In my opinion there is not that much difference between the two, both have the same excellent documentaries and photographs and contain the same commentary from the makers of the film. There are only two significant differences - firstly, the menus are different, but not necessarily better, and secondly, the DVD contains a commentary from Roger Moore. For this alone the DVD is worth buying as the commentary is excellent and shows Moore as the charming man he is.

However, if you are not interested in the Moore commentary but already own TSWLM on DVD, then this DVD is not worth buying as it is not radically different from the previous release. For this reason alone, I have deducted one star from my rating as undoubtedly TSWLM is defintely a five star film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of Moore's 'FX show' Bonds, 3 Nov 2008
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Spy Who Loved Me [DVD] (DVD)
The Spy Who Loved Me holds up, along with You Only Live Twice, as the best of the special effects show Bond movies (like Lewis Gilbert's other Bond, the dire Moonraker, it more or less shares the same plot and even identical camera set-ups in places). Planned to turn the Bonds back into blockbusters after the somewhat more down to Earth Harry Saltzman left the series, Cubby Broccoli plays safe with a virtual `greatest hits' compilation album of all your favorite Bond setpieces (the train fight from From Russia With Love, a gadget-filled car a la Goldfinger, a ski chase a la OHMSS, etc), but its put together with skill, panache and a sense of the epic that carries you along. Moore's Bond still has a bit of steel in him and the script is so good you find yourself wondering if it really is the same Christopher Wood responsible for the British soft-porn Confessions series credited as co-writer.

As with others in the series, this repackaged upgrade to 2-disc `Ultimate Edition' from the original single disc issue at times feels more cosmetic than actual in terms of extras (as usual, there are plenty of other potential supplements, such as Movietone newsreel footage of the shoot, that have not been included), although alongside brief archive footage of the massive purpose-built 007 Stage being dedicated, a vintage Roger Moore and a 1977 promo featurette covering the shoot in Egypt there are production designer Ken Adams' home movies of the shoot and a storyboard sequence. But, alongside Moore's new commentary, perhaps the most enjoyable extras are the TV spots and the teaser trailer introduced by Moore in character carried over from the previous issue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ONE OF THE BEST EVER BOND MOVIES OF ALL TIME !!, 28 Nov 2006
By 
NEO "Daren" (orpington kent) - See all my reviews
For me this has to be one of the best 007 movies of all time starring super cool Roger Moore as the legendary secret agent James Bond. This movie has it all from the gadget laden and minisub converting Lotus Esprit S1. To the lovely Bond Girls such as Agent Triple x Barbara Bach the theme by Carly Simon and Jaws. Industrialist and madman played by Kurt Yugens as Stromberg who want world domination through a nuclear war. He steals a British Nuclear sub and a Russian one which are taken inside a huge super tanker. Bond is drafted in to track down Stromberg with Triple x and chase around the world with Jaws in pursuit. Finally Strombergs underwater palace named 'Atlantis' is destroyed by a torpedo from the American sub.

There are many memorable sequences in this film such as Bonds escape from the KGB in Austria, to the Esprit coming out onto the beach , the attack by Jaws in the valley of the kings in egypt to Bond facing off Stromberg at the end of the movie. The extras are axtensive on this new issue and are a little better than the previous issue. A documentary charts the films troubled beginning to script changes and a the building of the huge soundstage at Pinewood. To the detailed events on how Colin Chapman managed to get the then new Lotus Esprit to take on a starring role in the film. I'm not sure I would buy this issue as I have the previous one but it's a must for the Bond fan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just keeping the British end up..., 9 Dec 2005
By 
Mr. J. WARE "wolvieware" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
With the spy who loved me you are in for a typical James Bond treat - plenty of action, plenty of one-liners and plenty of girls.
The film does very well to keep itself feeling fresh, and interesting, because a lot of its plot points and even its action set pieces are all something we've already seen in the previous Bond films. Even so, the spy who loved me is so fast paced, and filled with so much charm, energy and fun, you don't really mind it being a rehash.
The plot is pointless, about some baddies wanting to capture nuclear missles by stealing submarines, but who watches Bond for the plot? The action scenes are breath-taking, especially a skiing pre-credits sequence, with some stunning stunts.
Roger Moore is on fine form. He can keep such a straight face during some of the geniunely funny one-liners. They don't make you groan, rather just make you enjoy the action more. He's also very believable as the action man Bond should be.
Unfortunately, Stromberg, the villain of the movie, although played well, is not a very evil character, and the film suffers slightly because of that. Still, at least we have the introduction of Jaws, the metal teethed goon who is super strong, and provides the most memorable parts of the film.
The Spy Who Loved Me also contains the most recognisable Bond car after the ASton Martin DB5 - the Lotus which can turn into an underwater submersible. Fantastic!
Extras are the usual Bond fare - excellent documentary, and a wonderful featurette on the production designer. Trailers also included.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By far Moore's best, 21 Jan 2002
By A Customer
After the very mediocre 'The man with the golden gun', the series returns with a vengeance. 'The Spy who loved me' is cinematic genius. It is easy to see why this film got people back into Bond when it was first released. The action is explosive and gripping, the women are quite possibly the most beautiful ever seen in a Bond film and the comedy instead of being forced and immature is absolutely hilarious! Moore gives his best perfomance of his 7 films and he is not let down by the supporting role from Barbara Bach and Richard Kiel. The music is fantastic, particularly the theme song by Carly Simon. If you do not own this video already then you have a bleak void in your collection which can only be filled by this film alone. Whether you are a Bond fan or not, I have no doubt that you will love this film right from the breathtaking opening sequence to the hysterical (and quite camp!!!) ending. Quite simply brilliant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "It's Bond - and Beyond!", 30 July 2010
By 
Matthew Norton (Wolverhampton, UK) - See all my reviews
This is my favourite Bond film. It is the Package - let us examine in detail: the ski chase sequence and the Union Flag parachute; "Nobody Does It Better"; Barbara Bach; nuclear submarines; Barbara Bach; the debut appearance of Jaws; a fantastic disco-funk soundtrack; Barbara Bach; the submersible Lotus; Barbara Bach looking stunning in a Soviet Army uniform; oodles of wit and humour; a classic Bond villain; Barbara Bach looking stunning out of a Soviet Army uniform; explosive denouement on board giant oil tanker; nuclear explosions; BARBARA BACH!!!

What more could a teenage lad have asked for?

I have proclaimed Roger Moore to be my favourite James Bond. I was told I had "a great sense of irony". But Moore is an integral part of the triumph that is "The Spy Who Loved Me". I am tempted to ask whether anyone could have done it better, but that would just be too, TOO obvious....

The cheesy quote with which I have titled this review is taken from the original cinematic trailer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars James Bond's Greatest Hits - the ultimate Bond compilation film!, 12 Dec 2007
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
The Spy Who Loved Me holds up, along with You Only Live Twice, as the best of the special effects show Bond movies (like Lewis Gilbert's other Bond, the dire Moonraker, it more or less shares the same plot and even identical camera set-ups in places). Planned to turn the Bonds back into blockbusters after the somewhat more down to Earth Harry Saltzman left the series, Cubby Broccoli plays safe with a virtual `greatest hits' compilation album of all your favorite Bond setpieces (the train fight from From Russia With Love, a gadget-filled car a la Goldfinger, a ski chase a la OHMSS, etc), but its put together with skill, panache and a sense of the epic that carries you along. Moore's Bond still has a bit of steel in him and the script is so good you find yourself wondering if it really is the same Christopher Wood responsible for the British soft-porn Confessions series credited as co-writer.

If you only want the film rather than the extras, this single-disc is a fair bet, including the new Roger Moore audio commentary from the two-disc Ultimate Edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moore finds his groove as Bond, 2 Oct 2007
By 
Mr. Stephen Kennedy "skenn1701a" (Doha, Qatar) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
By this 1977 movie, the Roger Moore era of movies had found their direction and formula. The same as Goldfinger represented the coming together of ingredients for Connery, here Moore is at his most relaxed in the role, but still young enough to get away with it, and the sets, the villain, the set pieces, all create the mood for the definitive Moore Bond movie.
Alas, the definitive Bond movie has aged badly, unless you are able to relish the campness of the massive (and still impressive) sets and the script apparently written by a three year old (GIRL: `James, I need you!'... BOND: `..so does England!'). It's a miracle that medical attention was not required to remove tongues from cheeks...
Clearly, the mood of the times was for escapism and fantasy - and this movie fit the mould well. Barbara Bach is one of the most beautiful Bond girls, and actually plays quite a strong role, even though her acting lessons seem to have been taken at a carpentry school instead of a drama school. The signature stunt at the beginning of the movie, where Bond skis off a cliff and after a few heartstopping moments the parachute bursts open to reveal the Union Jack, is sublime lunacy that raised cheers in the cinema in 1977. Curt Jurgens is inspired casting to lend a degree of gravitas to the megalomaniac Stromberg. An additional bonus is the first appearance of Jaws, played by Richard Kiel - you can't help feeling that the scenes where he keeps trying and failing to get 007 leave you rooting for Jaws more than Bond. It's obvious why they brought him back in the next movie. The music has shifted in tone from John Barry's classic riffs and stringy feel, to an electronic mood, which again exaggerates the 70's feel of the movie... and let's not start on the ladies hairstyles... And the character of Bond is changing. More one liners than ever to be sure.. but compare Connery in the very similar action scene at the end of You Only Live Twice (same director) - there, Connery moves gracefully throught the milieu almost like a dancer, dealing with the enemy only as and when he needs to to achieve his goal, leaving the fighting and blowing up to others. Here, Moore has to be at the centre of everything, and lead all the action scenes. It's a trend which takes the character into fantasy more than ever before.
The Ultimate Edition has the crystal clear picture and sound we have come to expect, and all the extras from the Special Edition, including the essential documentary Inside The Spy Who Loved Me, and the commentary of the movie - all excellent value. New features include a brand new commentary by Moore, and an abundance of minor period featurettes, such as the 007 sound stage dedication, opened by Harold Wilson, the ex -PM.
This is a movie much parodied, and obviously camp and dated, and yet that is its whole appeal - it was at the time entirely original (well, except the plot elements stolen from other Bond movies) and full of iconic items and moments - the Lotus Esprit, the Pyramids light show, the first movie appearance of a jetski, Jaws... It is a movie which in no way tries to be timeless - it is very much of the time, and as such it's a small treasure.... as long as you know what you are letting yourself in for.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of Moore's 'FX show' Bonds, 19 Feb 2007
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
The Spy Who Loved Me holds up, along with You Only Live Twice, as the best of the special effects show Bond movies (like Lewis Gilbert's other Bond, the dire Moonraker, it more or less shares the same plot and even identical camera set-ups in places). Planned to turn the Bonds back into blockbusters after the somewhat more down to Earth Harry Saltzman left the series, Cubby Broccoli plays safe with a virtual `greatest hits' compilation album of all your favorite Bond setpieces (the train fight from From Russia With Love, a gadget-filled car a la Goldfinger, a ski chase a la OHMSS, etc), but its put together with skill, panache and a sense of the epic that carries you along. Moore's Bond still has a bit of steel in him and the script is so good you find yourself wondering if it really is the same Christopher Wood responsible for the British soft-porn Confessions series credited as co-writer.

As with others in the series, the upgrade to 2-disc `Ultimate Edition' at times feels more cosmetic than actual in terms of extras (as usual, there are plenty of other potential supplements, such as Movietone newsreel footage of the shoot, that have not been included), although alongside brief archive footage of the massive purpose-built 007 Stage being dedicated, a vintage Roger Moore and a 1977 promo featurette covering the shoot in Egypt there are production designer Ken Adams' home movies of the shoot and a storyboard sequence. But, alongside Moore's new commentary, perhaps the most enjoyable extras are the TV spots and the teaser trailer introduced by Moore in character carried over from the previous issue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of the Bonds, 9 Oct 2000
By A Customer
To my mind, this is the best of the Bonds. Roger Moore is at his apex both in his role as sophisticated secret agent and clowning buffoon. The stunning locations range from the oceans of Stromberg's underwater palace - Atlantis - to the sun-kissed beaches of Sardinia, the Pyramids of Egypt and the ski-slopes of the Austrian Alps. The characters are unmatched in any Bond film - we have the usual star-turns from Q and M, but Richard kiel as Jaws and Barbara Bach as Anya steal the limelight as the casting director's dreams come to life. Also worth a mention are chubby tie-wearing assasin Chandor, slick bearded night-club owner Max Kalber and the cowardly little Mr Aziz Fekesh. No review of 'Spy', howver, would be complete without mentioning the wonderful performance of Kurt Jurgens who plays villainous Karl Stromberg, shipping magnate, bon-viveur and the man who feeds his secretary to a hungry shark accompanied by Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 21. Stromberg is a man who likes to be associated with the trappings of cultural excellence - he adores Botticelli, he's a fan of Mozart and he is constantly nibbling on gastronomic delights. His plan, however, to create "a new and beautiful world beneath the sea" is surely a warped echo of the Beatles song "An Octopus's Garden" and gives us a clear indication as to how bonkers Stromberg really is. 'Spy' turns out a plethora of terrific gadgets - the Lotus that turns into a submarine, the ski-pole that shoots a deadly man blast, and the Union Jack parachute - a truly incredible stunt. The screen is also graced by Naomi, Stromberg's loyal assistant, and arguably the most charming assassin ever to lock horns with Bond. Roger Moore revels in his element and ensures that Ian Fleming's 'The Spy Who Loved Me' endures forever - entertaining, thrilling and ultimately "keeping the British end up".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xf82b9e4)

This product

The Spy Who Loved Me [Blu-ray] [1977]
The Spy Who Loved Me [Blu-ray] [1977] by Lewis Gilbert (Blu-ray - 2013)
12.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews