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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Her Majesty's Secret Service, 2006 double disc Ultimate Edition - An unusually emotionally charged Bond film
For superspy James Bond's sixth big screen outing, and the first not to star Sean Connery in the lead role, we were served up with a rather different style of film, which ranks up there with `From Russia With Love' as my favourite in the series.

There are several things that make this film stand out in the series. Firstly, for me, is the score. There are...
Published on 23 Aug 2010 by Victor

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Defective Blu-Ray
A number of Bond Blu-Rays in my collection are glitchy but this is the worst (I have had no other defects from other manufacturers). I ordered the first one in February 2013. It glitched, pixellated and then stopped just after 120 mins in. The Blue Ray player was getting on a bit so I bought a new one, it still wouldn't play. However, it was now past Amazon's...
Published 10 months ago by BrianD


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Her Majesty's Secret Service, 2006 double disc Ultimate Edition - An unusually emotionally charged Bond film, 23 Aug 2010
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
For superspy James Bond's sixth big screen outing, and the first not to star Sean Connery in the lead role, we were served up with a rather different style of film, which ranks up there with `From Russia With Love' as my favourite in the series.

There are several things that make this film stand out in the series. Firstly, for me, is the score. There are grand, stirring action themes full of sweeping horns and strings, but there is also a series of gentle romantic themes, the best of which is Louis Armstrong's contribution. Then there is the attitude of the film - there is still the emphasis on action and big set pieces, but there for the first time since Dr No some attempt is made to develop Bond's character, and show his compassionate side. There is also a slightly different attitude to women. Usually there as objects for Bond to fall into bed with, with little or no emotional attachment, for the first time we see him falling in love and behaving in a totally different manner.

George Lazenby acquits himself well as Bond. Many people have described him as wooden, but I just don't see it. In the final scene after Blofeld's devastating revenge he portrays Bond's grief and inability to cope to a tee. That scene always brings a lump to the throat. Telly Savalas does a grand job as Blofeld. Not quite as creepy as Donald Pleasance in the previous film, but with an air of ruthless evil and great intelligence. Finally I must mention Diana Rigg, who plays the most memorable Bond girl of all time. She is one of the few Bond girl's who is required to do more than hang around and look pretty. She shows the various aspects of Tracy's character and makes her a totally believable construct. And she looks pretty as well...

This ultimate edition really is the best version of the film I have owned. The picture has been lovingly restored and cleaned up, and looks amazing. Really, I am not just saying that. It looks superb. The sound has been similarly treated and there is an option to listen to it in 5.1 DTS surround, which is truly exceptional.

As well as the superb presentation of the film, there is also a host of extras, original trailers, informative audio commentaries and the such. These are exhaustive and some of them quite interesting. But these really a garnish for the main course, which is the film itself.

This is an excellent release, and does this classic film justice. This series of `Ultimate editions' really sets the standard for film releases. It really does not get any better.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ultimate Bond, 7 Feb 2010
By 
Scott T. Rivers (Atlanta, GA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Unfairly maligned in some quarters, "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969) remains among the top-five James Bond adventures. It's fitting that Sean Connery chose to sit this one out, since the Bond depicted in this film is more romantic and vulnerable. With George Lazenby as 007, you actually believe Bond would give up everything to marry Tracy (a memorable Diana Rigg). It's a pity that Lazenby didn't continue in the role, but his one-time performance adds to the film's uniqueness. Director Peter Hunt gives "OHMSS" a cinematic flair lacking in most Bond films - highlighted by some of the finest action sequences in movie history. Remastered and expanded, the two-disc "Ultimate Edition" is a must-own for 007 fans.
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bond at his best in the best of the Ultimate Editions, 3 Nov 2008
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
No Bond film has suffered as much historical and critical revisionism as On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A huge hit on its first release and no better or worse reviewed than any of the preceding Bonds, George Lazenby's decision to leave the series before the film was released led to a tidal wave of attacks from the press and spurned co-producer Albert R. Broccoli (who even removed Lazenby's face from the original US poster!) that cast such a dark shadow over the film that the fact it's one of the highpoints of the series slipped from the public consciousness. Instead it became the Bond that flopped (if taking more than ten times its cost can be called flopping), the Bond that everybody hated (there were plenty of rave reviews to prove otherwise) with the Bond so bad he had to be fired (the producers tried to sign him up for several more pictures but, foolishly he admits, their new star thought the series was on the way out). It didn't help that the film was subsequently heavily cut for reissues and TV, and it's only with the Ultimate Edition DVD that the film is finally available in its absolutely uncut version (even the previous DVD was missing a few shots). Over the years its reputation has gradually grown, although EON clearly still regard it as the black sheep of the series: where the producers proudly boasted in 1970 that it was the fastest Bond to recoup its cost, for the documentary here they maintain it was the slowest. It's tempting to imagine whether 2006's Casino Royale would have met with similar treatment had Daniel Craig decided to call it a day before it opened...

It's all the more mystifying considering how fresh and genuinely exciting much of the film still is today. With many of the series' regulars off making Shalako with Sean Connery (as was intended leading lady Brigitte Bardot), the film benefits greatly from new blood and new ideas while debuting director Peter Hunt's long experience as the series editor keeps it recognisably a Bond film. George Leech's stuntwork is much better than anything Bob Simmonds ever came up with, while cinematographer Michael Reed's superb work in the Swiss locations makes it one of the most visually memorable of the series. The ski chases still amaze, with Willi Bogner and Johnny Jordan going to ridiculously dangerous lengths to secure shots no-one had ever attempted before or equalled since (Bogner skiing backwards with a camera for the ground shots while Jordan was suspended from a helicopter for the aerial shots!), made all the more vivid by John Barry's superb score with its most exciting main title theme of the entire series.

Blessed with one of the strongest and certainly the most emotional of Fleming's plots, followed much more closely than the norm for the films, it also has a healthy contempt for the gadgets that keeps Bond, not the hardware centre stage: he may use a hefty gizmo to crack a safe, but he's more interested in leafing through Playboy while waiting for it to do its job. Elsewhere, he uses his wits and what's available. It's particularly gratifying to see him tear out his pockets and use them as makeshift gloves in one scene

There are odd moments of awkwardness to Lazenby's performance, but nothing truly fatal, and he grows into the role as it progresses. Indeed, as the first Bond to be asked to show real fear (in the ice rink sequence) and despair (the ending), at his best he's far more natural than his detractors give him credit and despite being intended as a Connery imitator there are plenty of moments where he makes the part his own. He's certainly the most physical Bond, not least because of Peter Hunt's determination to put him in harm's way so the camera can come in close in the vicious fight sequences. As for whether Connery would have made the film better still, it's doubtful. Had it originally followed Goldfinger as was originally planned, it's possible, but by the time the oft-rescheduled picture finally went before the camera he'd lost all interest in the part and it's hard to imagine him putting any more effort into it than he did in Diamonds Are Forever. It's certainly impossible to imagine him pulling off the film's devastating final scene by that point.

On the debit side, the pacing is slightly problematic, not least due to the deletion of an uncompleted chase through the London Underground that leaves the film with a slight sag in the middle. That continuity problem with Blofeld not recognising Bond IS irritating (OHMSS was intended to be their first meeting), the romantic montage feels like a jewellers commercial and at times Hunt's cut-to-the-bone editing style is overdone. None of which stop this being very nearly the best Bond of them all, and the one the series wouldn't come close to matching for another 37 years.

For Bond fans, this repackaged two-disc Ultimate Edition is like a brightly lit Christmas Tree on Christmas morning, with plenty of new extras to make it worth an upgrade to the two-disc edition if you already have the previous DVD. Of these, the most interesting are the interviews with Lazenby from the time of the film's release. Much criticised for his arrogance and ego in an era when stars were kept on a tight leash, now he simply seems honest and sincere and considerably more positive about the film than many of today's stars on modern press junkets. Unfortunately, while all three original 1969 making-of featurettes have been included on this issue, Shot On Ice, about the filming of the stock car sequence, has been clumsily tampered with, the extracts from the film taken from the remastered print in widescreen in away that will annoy the purists. It's also missing the alternate theatrical trailers that have appeared on the laserdisc and video releases in the past. But to go some way to compensating, the disc also includes new featurettes on casting the film and a staged press day during shooting as well as all the extras from the original release - plus that tidied up uncut version. Highly recommended, this is Bond at his best.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Bond Pictures, 12 Dec 2004
By 
I'll preface this review by saying, this was the first Bond picture I ever saw (so I had no sense of Connery's performance). Having said that- and confirming Connery is the best of all the actors to have played Bond- OHMSS remains my personal favorite.
I also will state that George Lazenby (for my money), is the only other person to have played Bond well. He played it differently and yet he was able to carry off the suave and the brutal sides of the character with great style. This was no easy feat- even with Peter Hunt's help. To fill the shoes of both Connery and Bond was no easy task and, being the first to do so in what has been a succession of actors now, was both tough and overwhelming in weight and response.
This film departed from the rest of the series and reached back to both the elements of the books, and giving Bond an equal in his love interest. Tracy (the magnificent Diana Rigg) was dangerous, self destructive and yet mesmerizing. This film demands some sudden vulnerability and humanity from Bond, and this is where I think Lazenby and Hunt succeeded. They still retain enough of the gadgets, the threat to the world ( Telly Savalas in a finally fleshed out, equally suave and terrific portrayal of Bond's arch enemy, Ernst Stavaro Blofeld), and the womanizing. Still- Bond is suddenly seen needing or wanting something more.
It has John Barry's best Bond score (with Louis Armstrong singing the love theme in what was one of his best and last performances).
The fight sequences are great- the locations, pure Bond in scope and size and the performances of all, above and beyond. M, Moneypenny and Q, and Gabriele Ferzetti (as Rigg's father)- all terrific.
A recent polling indicated that this had placed in the top 5 of all Bond films with the British. Considering the trashing that Lazenby took when it was released (and through the years), there must be some long overdue comfort in that. One has only to read some of my fellow reviewers to see- a great many of us feel that way, too.
I even felt, any time I saw Connery interviewed about the others, that quietly he felt Lazenby had probably followed him the best. Connery is a class act and it isn't in his nature to get into such things but he actually spoke about ways he could have helped him- which I thought was a tipping of the cap of sorts.
There has been much written about why Lazenby didn't return to the role- his side and theirs. Sad for both parties and for the fans of the series. It would have been interesting to see him do a few more although, if you only have one in the fold- OHMSS is pure gold.
This never happened to any of the other guys that followed!
One for Bond purists, Bond fans and for the romantics, too. There's a marvelous love story here.
Enjoy.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bond at his best in the best of the Ultimate Editions, 12 Dec 2007
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
No Bond film has suffered as much historical and critical revisionism as On Her Majesty's Secret Service. A huge hit on its first release and no better or worse reviewed than any of the preceding Bonds, George Lazenby's decision to leave the series before the film was released led to a tidal wave of attacks from the press and spurned co-producer Albert R. Broccoli (who even removed Lazenby's face from the original US poster!) that cast such a dark shadow over the film that the fact it's one of the highpoints of the series slipped from the public consciousness. Instead it became the Bond that flopped (if taking more than ten times its cost can be called flopping), the Bond that everybody hated (there were plenty of rave reviews to prove otherwise) with the Bond so bad he had to be fired (the producers tried to sign him up for several more pictures but, foolishly he admits, their new star thought the series was on the way out). It didn't help that the film was subsequently heavily cut for reissues and TV, and it's only with the Ultimate Edition DVD that the film is finally available in its absolutely uncut version (even the previous DVD was missing a few shots). Over the years its reputation has gradually grown, although EON clearly still regard it as the black sheep of the series: where the producers proudly boasted in 1970 that it was the fastest Bond to recoup its cost, for the documentary here they maintain it was the slowest. It's tempting to imagine whether 2006's Casino Royale would have met with similar treatment had Daniel Craig decided to call it a day before it opened...

It's all the more mystifying considering how fresh and genuinely exciting much of the film still is today. With many of the series' regulars off making Shalako with Sean Connery (as was intended leading lady Brigitte Bardot), the film benefits greatly from new blood and new ideas while debuting director Peter Hunt's long experience as the series editor keeps it recognisably a Bond film. George Leech's stuntwork is much better than anything Bob Simmonds ever came up with, while cinematographer Michael Reed's superb work in the Swiss locations makes it one of the most visually memorable of the series. The ski chases still amaze, with Willi Bogner and Johnny Jordan going to ridiculously dangerous lengths to secure shots no-one had ever attempted before or equalled since (Bogner skiing backwards with a camera for the ground shots while Jordan was suspended from a helicopter for the aerial shots!), made all the more vivid by John Barry's superb score with its most exciting main title theme of the entire series.

Blessed with one of the strongest and certainly the most emotional of Fleming's plots, followed much more closely than the norm for the films, it also has a healthy contempt for the gadgets that keeps Bond, not the hardware centre stage: he may use a hefty gizmo to crack a safe, but he's more interested in leafing through Playboy while waiting for it to do its job. Elsewhere, he uses his wits and what's available. It's particularly gratifying to see him tear out his pockets and use them as makeshift gloves in one scene

There are odd moments of awkwardness to Lazenby's performance, but nothing truly fatal, and he grows into the role as it progresses. Indeed, as the first Bond to be asked to show real fear (in the ice rink sequence) and despair (the ending), at his best he's far more natural than his detractors give him credit and despite being intended as a Connery imitator there are plenty of moments where he makes the part his own. He's certainly the most physical Bond, not least because of Peter Hunt's determination to put him in harm's way so the camera can come in close in the vicious fight sequences. As for whether Connery would have made the film better still, it's doubtful. Had it originally followed Goldfinger as was originally planned, it's possible, but by the time the oft-rescheduled picture finally went before the camera he'd lost all interest in the part and it's hard to imagine him putting any more effort into it than he did in Diamonds Are Forever. It's certainly impossible to imagine him pulling off the film's devastating final scene by that point.

On the debit side, the pacing is slightly problematic, not least due to the deletion of an uncompleted chase through the London Underground that leaves the film with a slight sag in the middle. That continuity problem with Blofeld not recognising Bond IS irritating (OHMSS was intended to be their first meeting), the romantic montage feels like a jewellers commercial and at times Hunt's cut-to-the-bone editing style is overdone. None of which stop this being very nearly the best Bond of them all, and the one the series wouldn't come close to matching for another 37 years.

For Bond fans, this two-disc Ultimate Edition is like a brightly lit Christmas Tree on Christmas morning, with plenty of new extras to make it worth an upgrade to the two-disc edition if you already have the previous DVD. Of these, the most interesting are the interviews with Lazenby from the time of the film's release. Much criticised for his arrogance and ego in an era when stars were kept on a tight leash, now he simply seems honest and sincere and considerably more positive about the film than many of today's stars on modern press junkets. Unfortunately, while all three original 1969 making-of featurettes have been included on this issue, Shot On Ice, about the filming of the stock car sequence, has been clumsily tampered with, the extracts from the film taken from the remastered print in widescreen in away that will annoy the purists. It's also missing the alternate theatrical trailers that have appeared on the laserdisc and video releases in the past. But to go some way to compensating, the disc also includes new featurettes on casting the film and a staged press day during shooting as well as all the extras from the original release - plus that tidied up uncut version. Highly recommended, this is Bond at his best.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On Her Majesty's Secret Service - 'Far Up! Far Out! Far More!', 12 July 2006
*Spoilers*

A grand extraordinaire of a James Bond film. It's difficult at times to find a better Bond film than this one. Known sometimes to me as "The Christmas James Bond film", On Her Majesty's Secret Service never ceases to amaze and entertain.

Geroge Lazenby, while not Connery, gives a solid portrayal of James Bond 007. He's a man of action, and this film very well supports that, giving him much to do in it. I feel, while I like the four other Bond actors better at times, for this single film, Lazenby showed off some very good points and he gives a better performance in it to just be labeled "that other guy that just did one."

Diana Rigg; a true angel of a Bond girl. In my opinion, what can be said about her performance as Tracy is mostly all good points. She's tough and resourceful, but not to a point where she's trying to be better than Bond, and she doesn't always remind the audience that she can do as much as he can, she just plays the role, and she plays it well. Her scenes of lashing against her father's words and her eventual fall for Bond are acted out quite well. As is, which I say is perhaps the classiest moment in the film series, her skating onto the scene to help Bond escape from Irma Bunt and SPECTRE. Her death at the end of the film is a strong one, strong enough that the James Bond theme is played at the very end to remind people that this is a Bond film, no matter what these large differences are that have yet to occur in the series, (such as the Bond girl being killed).

Ernst Stavro Blofeld and Irma Bunt are very solid Bond villains. They both deliver well, with Bunt's casual barking of orders at dinner to be quite the way she defines her respect. I have come to like Telly Savalas performance more and more over time. His calm manor, almost competitive in that he has moments where it seems he has taken control over Bond's actions are good touches and add to the film.

John Barry is a master and On Her Majesty's Secret Service is without a doubt one of the places to look for evidence of that. Shows a main title piece doesn't need lyrics or a performer to be a damned good "killer tune". The whole score, from the romantic melodies to the fast-paced action cues is on top of the game and is always enjoyable to listen to.

Peter Hunt deserves much credit for taking what many fans call Ian Fleming's best James Bond novel and doing something great with it - simply turning it into a film. He had the right idea in mind to faithfully adapt many parts of the story, as it worked so well.

It's a classic Bond film that only seems to get better over time.

[...]
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A review of the remastering of the DVD, 14 Sep 2010
By 
B. C. Swinbank "barry" (Surrey, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I would like to review the remastering and not the film, as I think most people know the story by now.

Basically the film has had a total clean up. All the bits of fluff and marks have been removed. You would be surprised if you watch an older DVD copy as to the difference. Although they didn't seem to use 'blue screen' a great deal in Bond films,(alot of back projection) where they have the picture is a big improvement (Little Nellie-You Only Live Twice).

The colour of the dawn helicopter flight in OHMSS is so good I had to watch the older DVD to see if it was the same footage.

The sound is much sharper, adding a few extra sound effects here and there, which I do question, but there you go.

The restored picture doesn't always work for me, for example where they have tried to match night time shots in OHMSS. On the old DVD the sky is almost black, then next shot dark blue - then perhaps back to black again. On the remastered copy they have matched it all to the dark blue- I think black would have looked better.

The price at the moment is 'as cheap as chips'and worth adding to your Bond collection - just stick the DVD in the older box. I suspect that the older Bond films (pre-Roger Moore)are more likly to benefit from the restoration more than the later ones.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the most important Bond films, 7 Jan 2008
By 
James the King (...under the stairs) - See all my reviews
George Lazenby seems to split Bond fans down the middle - they either love him or loath him. Personally, I'm somewhere in between, but I do consider OHMSS one of the most important Bond moments and, in many ways, one of the best films.

The most striking difference about this film is the tone, underpinned by the unthinkable notion that James Bond could fall in love. Despite Lazenby shortcomings as an actor, the relationship between Bond and Diana Rigg's Tracey is completely believable, and this is what gives the films its clout, even today.

The set-up is nothing new. Blofeld plots to brain-wash and hypnotise a group of conveniently sexy young women and use them to spread a virus for which only he has the cure. It's all very well until the hypnotism scenes, which ripped off the laughably bad ending from The Ipcress File (on which Peter Hunt, OHMSS's director, was the editor).

Location wise, the film-makers struck gold in Switzerland. Consequently, this film is graced with some of the best ski-chase sequences of the series and some beautiful cinematography too.

Some of the fights are a bit clumsy, and the editing seems particularly cack-handed in places. Ironically the director, Peter Hunt, had been the editor on four of the previous Bonds. The editor replacing him was John Glen, who went on to direct five Bond films which were among the best as far as action goes.

This is really only a small gripe though, as this film is not about the action but about character. Not until 'Casino Royale', nearly 30 years on, would we see a Bond this vulnerable again. Shame really, especially given that they subsequently followed this film with the light and largely pointless 'Diamond Are Forver'.

Whatever you may think of Lazenby, this film is an essential part of the Bond saga and, for my money, a genuinely moving piece of dramatic cinema as well.

As with all the new Bond DVDs, the picture and sound have been remasted to stunning effect. Watching these films on an upscaling DVD player, you will be amazed at how clean they look, sound and feel. Extras are superb too, with a nice 30 minute documenatry and a wealth of other tidbits.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This never happened to the other fella..., 28 Dec 2005
By 
Mr. J. WARE "wolvieware" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
And so you come to this, George Lazenby's one and only James Bond film - the oddity in the series, but still no less spectacular.
Just because Lazenby only did the one Bond film does not make this a bad movie, a common misconception.Sure, he's not very comfortable in the lead role, but that would have been something that came over time, if he had been given the chance. Instead he's merely passable as the hero.
His coming and going is covered in much length in the bonus 40 minute documentary, that provides unbiased insight into the making of the film and the controversial hiring and firing of the actor.
Still, at least he made an impact on the series. The action scenes here are full of amazing stunts, particularly the ski chase and the bob sled section. The movie starts off well, with a beuatifully filmed pre-credits action scene.
And although that sets up a action packed film, the plot line, trying to track down uber-villain Blofeld, is over long, padded and skimpy. It's even more annoying in the fact that the film doesn't actually finish, as Blofeld is still on baddie duties in future Bond films, which really makes this plot a waste of time.
Still, the Bond formula is in place, plenty of girls, magnificent set pieces and a delightful leading lady in Diana Rigg. It all leads up to the most shocking scene in any Bond film, and if you havn't seen this already, then it comes as a real surprise, a gut punch of an ending.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Hit Wonder!!, 20 Nov 2002
On Her Majesty's Secret Service is a strange entry to the Bond series, widely forgotten by the general movie going public, but plauded as the greatest Bond movie of all time by many of the Bond die hards. In truth OHMSS is a wonderful film which is a masterpiece in the series along with: Goldfinger, From Russia With Love and The Spy Who Loved Me.
The main reason why it is the forgotten film of the series is becase it stars George Lazenby as Bond and not Sean Connery. This however was it only undoing feature (even though Lazenby makes a very good Bond) as the movie going public wants to see Connery in this role.
The movies good feature far and away out do the bad. It looks stunning and has arguably the best plot line of any of the Bond movies, which closely follows that of Fleming's novel (also his best). Diana Rigg as Bond's wife to be Tracey is the best Bond girl in the series and the film is beautifully shot by director Peter Hunt.
The wonderful and emotional plotline are what make OHMSS great, and even though George Lazenby gives a very good performance as James Bond you can only wonder how different history would see this movie if Sean Connery had played the part of 007, in my opinion OHMSS would have been view as the very best in the series
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On Her Majesty's Secret Service [Blu-ray] [1969]
On Her Majesty's Secret Service [Blu-ray] [1969] by Peter R. Hunt (Blu-ray - 2013)
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