Customer Reviews


52 Reviews
5 star:
 (18)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (7)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


63 of 69 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spoily Rotten
This book is Dalrymple's criticism of the effects of overt public displays of emotion.It shows how sentimentality has become a substitute for thinking & also coercive which has a damaging impact on society. How you feel about an issue being more important that being erudite about it. While Dalrymple does not expect us to behave as stoics, he notes how public...
Published on 15 Aug. 2010 by David Finn

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bet he's glad he got that off his chest!
I feel sorry for people like this author but I found it interesting to read a view of the world that is the complete opposite of mine. The underclass? Not worth helping only makes them lazier.Aid to Africa? Forget it it will only be swallowed up by charity bosses or worse African dictators. Children learning through play?Rubbish none of them will ever learn to read...
Published 2 months ago by Pat Downes


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3.0 out of 5 stars Wade through the middle-England nostalgia to discover some well-founded points., 20 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
If you have the insight to read this objectively and put aside the daily mail style rants where the author becomes less rational and more zealous right wing stiff upper lipped middle-Englander, it makes for a very thought provoking piece. These ideals, such as the promotion of jam-and-Jerusalem-Christianity in schools, sadly undermine the rational and considered critical evaluation of where good intent has thrown the metaphorical baby out with the bath water.
Even though I winced in places, I also nodded in agreement in others. So in my opinion, definitely worth reading as a start to make us consider where we should be looking to address some of our modern societal issues.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A culture that lost its way, 17 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
An accurate account of modern western societies, and how they are lost in a splurge of anything but the truth. Dalrymple never quite gets to the central cause of secularism, cultural relativism and moral relativism - essentially the attempt to remove Christianity from the West - but he is still very perceptive about diagnosing the symptoms, which are eating away at civilisation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, 8 July 2010
By 
Mr. B. M. Fisher "Ben" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Having read one other of the authors previous offerings (life at the bottom) I was mostly aware of what to expect, I was certainly not disappointed.
This book, as with other works by the same, is fantastic and a severe outburst of the common sense so desperately needed to be spoken in today's broken Britain - if only more people would read and repeat instead of agreeing because it simply seems easier!

If I could give it ten stars I would, highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the cult and the change in law, 30 Aug. 2013
By 
Mr. M. Macrae (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
This book describes what has taken place in British law-making over the recent decades. While the reader may consider or approve of the validity of sentimentality at the start, it is most unlikely they will agree with it if they make their way thorough the the whole book.

Some of the arguments are not of the soundbite-kind, and take several paragraphs to explain, again, a rare thing to read, since the attention span of many readers, educated recently, may be quite limited. The writer makes it quite clear that sentimentality has no place in law or the public sphere, no matter how that effects a victim. The law must indeed be blind, and seen to be blind.

The author shows how sentimentality has allowed the law to treat some citizens differently from others, mainly based on race. This is a long way from the aspirations of those who fought long and hard for equality in this country.

The fearful law on thought-crime (hating) is the ultimate sentimental doublethink, raising the aspect of race above all others, even murder or rape. The author correctly describes the inevitable consequences of such disasters on the social landscape, where everyone must self-censor out of thought crime fear.

Arguments are well made. It is rare to find such clear-thinking like this in these sentimental days
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Missed some obvious targets, 21 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed reading this rant, largely because I agreed with most of it. I was left, however, with the impression that he got bored with the subject and wanted to move on to something else. Obvious missed targets were the honours lists and the concept of victimhood and suffering as heroism. Dealing with the subject of the McCanns was perhaps a little unwise for him (can being a victim preclude the possibility of being a villain?) as it is far too easy to accuse him of the tribal loyalty so evident among like professionals - for sentimental reasons, of course.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good structure, good thesis, and application., 2 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
I admit that in the beginning I was reading this book as kind of soft reading to complement my more technical readings so I was not planning on being pulled in by it. So while I was in agreement with the first couple of chapters though perhaps a little too repetitive. I found the effect of this "sentimentality" to reach much further than I thought it would, learning about how it is structurally embedded to plague courts but without the intention to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not one of the doctor's best, 6 Sept. 2010
I've read nearly everything Dr Dalymple has written and I have to say that this is not among his best work. It is still a superior read and a shrewd analysis of sentimentality in Britain, but I'm not sure it goes far enough. He also misses a few obvious, if well covered, targets.

I am a big fan of Dalrymple's style, but he seems to be getting more verbose the older he gets. His earlier works are eloquently written but easy to read. His recent books could do with being more succinct. In this book he also uses case studies - such as that of the loathesome Stephen Pinker - that appeared in earlier books.

Dalrymple is bound to divide opinion, but the weight of evidence is definitely on his side. His critics might depict him as a fusty old dinosaur moaning about 'broken Britain' but little evidence is ever presented to counter his claims. Instead, his critics fall back on presenting him as a callous, out-of-touch duffer, as if by discrediting the man you discredit his views.

In the eyes of his critics, to be against the march of vulgarity, self-pity and sentimentality is to be behind the times. For those on the Left, these qualities are the hallmarks of progress. Decorum, self-restraint and a sense of duty are part of our shameful past - traits that are only cherished by unfeeling snobs.

The Left ridicules Dalrymple's claims about the state of the nation, as if there is nothing broken about Britain. And yet the Left's entire ideology is based on the belief that society is broken and in need of repair - by people like them, of course. Where social engineering has wrought the damage, the Left tells us there's nothing to report. It's all in the minds of swivel-eyed looks like Dalrymple, apparently. Where imperfections exist that can be attributed to the laissez-faire attitude of the Right, however, they are described as grave injustices that require the intervention of the state.

Sadly, there is no place in this analysis for facts or reason. It is a worldview designed to allow the kind of people Dalrymple deplores to show off their caring credentials and to exercise more control over the lives of others. Books like this expose the ideas of the Left as self-serving and destructive guff. Dalrymple's opinions might not be as fashionable or emotionally satisfying than those he opposes, but for the sake of everything decent in the world, we should pray that they eventually win the day.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars generally a good read, 1 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
Enjoyable and entertaining read and much to concur with. However I think it could benefit from more thorough editing. Not only does Dalrymple tend to be a little too verbose at times, there were several typos which let the reading experience down somewhat.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Okay, 16 Sept. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I enjoyed it, it was an engaging if not controversial read and i like The author's fresh mindset. At times overly pessimistic and it feels like Dalrymple adds in statements just for shock tactics - this aside - id recommend for its originality.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One to chew over.., 6 Sept. 2013
By 
MC (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spoilt Rotten: The Toxic Cult of Sentimentality (Kindle Edition)
I liked this book- but that's not to say that I agreed with every single thing the author said!

What I particularly liked was the way he exposed the coercion and brutality which can accompany sentimentality. If you are someone who is uneasy about being forced to use PC language while important issues and injustices are sidelined, then this is a book for you to dip into and tussle with.
I liked the analysis of the post-Diana outpouring of grief and trial by media. There is quite a lot in this book which is a serious warning against woolly and sentimental thinking. Read it with a clear-minded friend. Then enjoy the ensuing arguments!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 36 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews