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15
3.9 out of 5 stars
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 22 September 2013
good characterization, great dialogue and often funny. However I found myself getting increasingly irritated by the masses of typos. It was really distracting and spoilt the book for me. Sloppy proofreading is unforgivable and shows little respect for the reader
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 21 December 2012
Like all of the works of Orson Scott Card, this is very well written, but is let down completely by the failure to proofread it properly and the dreadful laziness of its editing. His readers deserve more than this from his publisher.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 29 January 2001
This book is an excellent read for someone who is interested in a diferent look at North American history, but also yearns for a touch of the fantasic. The first in a lovely saga that grips the reader from the first chapter. Following the young hero as he learns about his special place in the world and the battle of good and evil.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 23 June 2010
This is a book I had wanted to read for a couple of years now, after reading The Grinning Man short story found in Legends: Discworld, Pern, Song of Ice and Fire, Memory, Sorrow and Thorn, Wheel of Time, but only just managed to get to. I wasn't disappointed.

The story starts well; with a fast-paced account of Alvin's birth, containing action, drama and some good old fashioned witchery. The first few chapters had me hooked.

I have to say though, the middle of the book slowed the pace right down, and dare I say - had some right boring bits that made it read more like a history book than a fantasy novel. I managed to get past this though, and thankfully it only seemed to last for around 50-60 pages.

The final third of this book saw a return to the form found at the start, and left me wanting more. I can't wait to read the second book in the series: Red Prophet (The tales of Alvin Maker).

I would recommend this book to anyone to read; it's funny, magical, thrilling and at times, sad.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 May 2014
I have come across typos of one sort or another in almost every Kindle "book" I own, some glaring, some obvious, some subtle, some funny - but this has to be the worst ever. This beautiful story has typos (some in the form of totally stupid words) on almost every screen - had I not already read and did I not already LOVE this book I'd have been totally put off. I have just downloaded all the stories in the series and will persevere - having already read all the books I know what the wrong words should be - but the producers should be seriously reviewing how they are creating these titles in the Kindle format (just one example: Mood instead of blood, but the list is endless).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 9 March 2014
I love this author and this series is honestly one of the best I've ever ever read. Could not recommend it enough!
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Book one of the Tales of Alvin Maker.
This book tells the story of a boy who is born in remarkable circumstances to become the seventh son of a seventh son, a sign of greatness. As he grows older the boy, Alvin, begins to develop astonishing powers that give him a 'knack' for making things, he being the first Maker born 'since the one who turned the water into wine'. However, Alvin's opposite, the mysterious Unmaker, turns the ire of a fanatical priest against the boy.
Card tells of a fictional colonial America, when it is ripe with people with magical 'knacks', who have fled from the persecution of Europe's devout Christians.
The scene in which Alvin is born is really evocatively written and I loved the idea that water itself holds a grudge against Alvin. However, I have little interest in America's colonial history and the setting of this book is just too Little House on the Prairie for my liking.
I can't deny that the book is well written, but ultimately it comes down to personal taste and this isn't my cup of tea.
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on 22 September 2014
Took a bit to realise what was the thread of the story and then it shuttled along. Hopefully certain characters will reappear . Can't wait to find out.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 26 March 2010
Having put Enders game up there with pretty much one of my favourite books ever, I was determined to give this book some time. Never mind that the seemingly simplistic dialogue, it's surely just hiding the underlying depth of the novel. After ploughing through the book I have to say it's not. Maybe it's just for a younger audience in which case this isn't an entirely fair review.

That said, I would argue even if I read this age 10 I would find some of the writing truly cringeworthy and woefully spun out. Whereas the Enders series starting amazingly and tailed off badly, this series doesn't really seem to go anywhere.

You have to ask whether this is the same author that wrote the masterful enders game?
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 10 December 2004
Orson Scott Card is a master storyteller and can invest the most mundane events with multiple layers of meaning.
In particular this book keeps you guessing as to the nature of his alternate America. Characters like Peggy and Alvin's Dad see elemental forces at work; water keeps trying to kill little Alvin. Characters like the tortured Reverend Thrower see classic good vs. evil. Alvin himself fears 'The Unmaker' a malign chaotic force.
Card himself was raised Mormon and is something of a contravertialist in SF/Fantasy circles. Yet this is a thoughtful book that relentlessly questions faith; questions Christianity. It's almost 'The Omen' with Damien as the hero. Yes, really.
Which is right? All of the above or none at all? Well I'm going to have to get the next chapter to find out. See I'm hooked...
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