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107 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WHEN EAST AND WEST COLLIDE...
This is a magnificent and exquisitely wrought film, well nuanced and faithful in its adaptation of E.M. Forster's classic novel of the same name. Director David Lean, who had previously directed such cinematic triumphs as "Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia", outdid himself with this film, which was nominated for eleven Academy Awards and for which Peggy...
Published on 22 Feb 2003 by Lawyeraau

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Bit of a disappointment
The changes made in the film, if you have read the book is not good shame but sort of spoilt it
Published 16 months ago by SueMRochford


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107 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WHEN EAST AND WEST COLLIDE..., 22 Feb 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a magnificent and exquisitely wrought film, well nuanced and faithful in its adaptation of E.M. Forster's classic novel of the same name. Director David Lean, who had previously directed such cinematic triumphs as "Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia", outdid himself with this film, which was nominated for eleven Academy Awards and for which Peggy Ashcroft won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, as did Maurice Jarre for Best Score.
Set in 1928 colonial India, it is a story about racism and love. A headstrong and adventurous Englishwoman, Adela Quested (Judy Davis) travels to India to meet her fiance. She is accompanied on her journey by her fiance's elderly mother, Mrs. Moore (Peggy Ashcroft), a lovely and kindly woman who, upon reaching India, is appalled at the treatment of the native Indian populace by her own countrymen. She eventually makes the acquaintance of a very nice Indian man, Dr. Aziz (Victor Banerjee), who is surprised at being treated as a sentient human being by this Englishwoman. During a social occasion, in which the usual class boundaries were set aside, he again meets the delightful Mrs. Moore and is introduced to Adela Quested. Enthused by being treated as an equal, he gets carried away and invites them to be his guests on an excursion he can ill afford to a well known, but remote tourist spot, the Marabar caves.
It is a hot day and a long journey to these mysterious caves, and Dr. Aziz and Ms. Quested are thrown together more than they ordinarily would have been, setting the stage for a fateful and strange turn of events, one that would have great personal, as well as political, impact on the parties concerned. It is a collision of East and West and makes for a definitive statement about the nature of the relationship between the native Indian population and the British colonialists. It is a relationship that makes itself most manifest during the telling courtroom scenes, making it a film to be remembered.
This is a very well acted and compelling film, a sterling tribute to David Lean's directorial talents. In this, his last cinematic triumph, Lean leaves a legacy to be remembered, having exacted wonderful performances from the star studded cast, including James Fox, Alec Guinness, and Nigel Havers. Victor Banerjee is especially compelling as the put upon, well meaning Dr. Aziz, while Peggy Ashcroft gives a sensitive and well nuanced performance as the humane and soft hearted Mrs. Moore. Judy Davis is excellent as the conflicted Ms. Quested.
The DVD itself is first rate, offering crystal clear visuals that do justice to the breathtaking cinematography. Coupled with crisp sound, this DVD ensures one's viewing pleasure. It is one well worth having in one's collection.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This beautiful HD restoration will leave you breathless!, 27 Jun 2011
By 
Nigel Mc (The Chilterns) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is of the recently released Blu-ray version of Passage to India. Although the film Passage to India has been reviewed 18 times there has not been a single review of the version in high definition. I find this a little surprising because this classic film was simply crying out for the Blu-ray treatment. Is it worth upgrading to the new HD version? Without any hesitation the answer is a resounding `yes' and those yet to see the film you have a treat in store. Of all directors David Lean was the master perfectionist. His attention to detail was amazing and this can clearly be seen with the wonderful cinematography which is a feature of all his films and Passage to India in particular. High definition allows you to see the film as the Director intended - not the bland, semi-sharp picture that has appeared on network television over the years.

Cinema lovers are so lucky to be able to see this fabulous restoration. Sony has done a magnificent job in restoring David Lean's final masterpiece. The expression `they don't make them like this anymore' could have been written for this film. And please don't kid yourself that you have already seen the film on network television. Almost certainly you will have seen the unrestored version with indifferent picture quality and mediocre sound. Ideally, you should watch this film either through a projector or on the largest flat screen possible. The video quality is simply amazing, beautifully sharp picture throughout and wonderful vibrant colours all of which allows you to soak up the atmosphere which David Lean so carefully created. Some of the shots will leave you breathless!

This film is beautifully acted with an excellent story. What more could you want in a film? If all this was not enough there are a whole host of extras to accompany the film. After watching this film last night I was riveted to the screen with these in-depth supplements which included a profile of the author and interviews with David Lean and his production team. About half of these extras are in HD. I am also looking forward to re-watching the film with the `Beyond the Passage' trivia track which allows you to see the film with additional detail in a pop-up-track. This refurbishment has everything you want with a modern restoration - superb Dolby True HD soundtrack ad interactive picture-in-picture menu. Finally, I can confirm that the Blu-ray is multi-region.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WHEN EAST AND WEST COLLIDE..., 5 Nov 2002
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a magnificent and exquisitely wrought film, well nuanced and faithful in its adaptation of E.M. Forster's classic novel of the same name. Director David Lean, who had previously directed such cinematic triumphs as "Bridge on the River Kwai" and "Lawrence of Arabia", outdid himself with this film, which was nominated for eleven Academy Awards and for which Peggy Ashcroft won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, as did Maurice Jarre for Best Score.
Set in 1928 colonial India, it is a story about racism and love. A headstrong and adventurous Englishwoman, Adela Quested (Judy Davis) travels to India to meet her fiance. She is accompanied on her journey by her fiance's elderly mother, Mrs. Moore (Peggy Ashcroft), a lovely and kindly woman who, upon reaching India, is appalled at the treatment of the native Indian populace by her own countrymen. She eventually makes the acquaintance of a very nice Indian man, Dr. Aziz (Victor Banerjee), who is surprised at being treated as a sentient human being by this Englishwoman. During a social occasion, in which the usual class boundaries were set aside, he again meets the delightful Mrs. Moore and is introduced to Adela Quested. Enthused by being treated as an equal, he gets carried away and invites them to be his guests on an excursion he can ill afford to a well known, but remote tourist spot, the Marabar caves.
It is a hot day and a long journey to these mysterious caves, and Dr. Aziz and Ms. Quested are thrown together more than they ordinarily would have been, setting the stage for a fateful and strange turn of events, one that would have great personal, as well as political, impact on the parties concerned. It is a collision of East and West and makes for a definitive statement about the nature of the relationship between the native Indian population and the British colonialists. It is a relationship that makes itself most manifest during the telling courtroom scenes, making it a film to be remembered.
This is a very well acted and compelling film, a sterling tribute to David Lean's directorial talents. In this, his last cinematic triumph, Lean leaves a legacy to be remembered, having exacted wonderful performances from the star studded cast, including James Fox, Alec Guinness, and Nigel Havers. Victor Banerjee is especially compelling as the put upon, well meaning Dr. Aziz, while Peggy Ashcroft gives a sensitive and well nuanced performance as the humane and soft hearted Mrs. Moore. Judy Davis is excellent as the conflicted Ms. Quested.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Passage to India [1984] [Collector's Edition] [Blu-ray] [US Import], 2 Jun 2013
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A Passage to India [1984] [Collector's Edition] [Blu-ray] [US Import] Winner of two 1984 Academy Awards® for Best Supporting Actress [Dame Peggy Ashcroft] and Best Film Score [Maurice Jarre], Oscar winning Director Sir David Lean [1962: `Lawrence of Arabia' and 1957: `The Bridge On The River Kwai'] adapts E.M. Forster's novel of the political tensions in colonial India. Two-Time Oscar nominee Judy Davies [1984: Best Actress for `Husbands and Wives'] stars as Adela Quested, a plucky young woman, who journeys from England with the free-spirited Mrs. Moore [Dame Peggy Ashcroft]. Flouting convention, the two women accompany the handsome Dr. Aziz [Victor Banerjee] to the mysterious Marabar Caves. But things turn ugly when Adela Quested [Judy Davies] returns injured from the expedition. As British authorities urges her to press charges against Dr. Aziz. Sadly the line separating truth and fantasy begins to blur dramatically.

FILM FACT: Academy Awards® Winners: Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Peggy Ashcroft. Best Music (Original Score) for Maurice Jarre. Academy Awards® Nominations: Best Picture: John Brabourne and Richard Goodwin. Best Directing: Sir David Lean. Best Actress in a Leading Role for Judy Davis. Best Writing: Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Sir David Lean. Best Art Direction for John Box and Leslie Tomkins. Best Set Decoration for Hugh Scaife. Best Cinematography for Ernest Day. Best Costume Design for Judy Moorcroft. Best Film Editing for Sir David Lean. Best Sound for Graham V. Hartstone, Nicolas Le Messurier, Michael A. Carter and John W. Mitchell.

Golden Globes Winners: Best Foreign Film. Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for Peggy Ashcroft. Best Original Score for Maurice Jarre. Golden Globes Nominations: Best Director for Sir David Lean and Best Screenplay for Sir David Lean.

BAFTAs Winners: Best Actress in a Leading Role for Peggy Ashcroft. BAFTAs Nominations: Best Film. Best Actor for Victor Banerjee. Best Actor in a Supporting Role for James Fox. Best Adapted Screenplay for Sir David Lean. Best Cinematography for Ernest Day. Best Costume Design for Judy Moorcroft. Best Production Design for John Box and Best Film Music for Maurice Jarre

Cast: Judy Davis, Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Victor Banerjee, James Fox, Sir Alec Guinness, Nigel Havers, Michael Culver, Clive Swift, Art Malik, Saeed Jaffrey, Roshan Sethm Richard Wilson and Antonia Pemberton

Director: Sir David Lean

Producer: John Brabourne and Richard B. Goodwin

Screenplay: Sir David Lean

Composer: Maurice Jarre

Cinematography: Ernest Day

Resolution: 1080p [Metrocolor]

Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1

Audio: 5.1 Dolby TrueHD Master Audio, French: 5.1 Dolby TrueHD

Subtitles: English, English SDH, French and Spanish

Running Time: 164 minutes

Region: All Regions

Number of discs: 1

Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Andrew's Blu-ray Review - If there is such a thing, the film could be described as a minor epic, one that tells a small story painted on a broad canvas. An almost unrecognizably fresh-faced and wide-eyed Judy Davis stars as Adela Quested, a young Englishwoman of the 1920s on her first trip out of Britain, visiting India to be with her fiancé working as a magistrate there. Traveling with her is feisty Mrs. Moore [Dame Peggy Ashcroft], the fiancé's elderly mother who freely speaks her mind with little regard for decorum. The two get along splendidly. Adela seeks adventure and desires to see the exotic wonders of India. Mrs. Moore is less spirited, but respects the culture and people of the land. Both are disappointed upon arrival to be shuffled off away from the real India and isolated within the strictly segregated British community living in the country, which disdain the local people and have attempted to recreate every element of their home as if they'd never left.

From the introduction to an Indian way of life to the oasis of the British Raj within it, `A Passage to India' hustles and bustles with a complete vibrancy. David Lean takes E.M. Forster's novel and tells the turn of the story in very much his hallmark style. In part it's down to the quality of the novel but the director really does take the credit for bringing it all to life. Ok, so it's arguably not in the league of `Lawrence of Arabia' or `Bridge on the River Kwai' but it's certainly no lesser a class to them.

This tale of clashing cultures is complicated when Mrs. Moore and Adela, against the wishes of Moore's son and the stuffy Brits in their company, form a friendship with the affable Dr. Aziz, a young Indian man eager to introduce them to the glories of his country. Aziz arranges for a picnic at the distant Marabar Caves, a landmark of some spiritual significance in the mountains. Unfortunately, the trip goes disastrously wrong for all involved, and its outcome inadvertently sets off a political firestorm between the outraged Indian populace and the racist British powers in charge.

As with all of E.M. Forster's novels, 'Passage to India' is, at least in part, a story of manners and society, and the social boundaries drawn by class and race. As dramatized by Lean, the plot turns a little too preachy in its politics. It has some sudden shifts in character personalities that aren't sufficiently motivated by the events at the caves were meant to be ambiguous in the book, which was undoubtedly a tricky proposition to depict on screen, and Lean hasn't quite captured it. The last act also feels deflated and the picture wraps up with an unsatisfying anti-ending.

Modern audiences will likely find more troublesome the casting of Sir Alec Guinness painted up in brown face as the Indian character Professor Godbole. Even at the time, it was a controversial decision, if perhaps a bit more tolerable back in 1984. Thankfully, Sir Alec Guinness had the good sense to dial down the performance and avoid playing it broadly. The actor reportedly had grave reservations about taking the role and had to be talked into it by Lean. Honestly, if he weren't such a famous and recognizable British screen star, there isn't much in his portrayal to merit offense, though it does unavoidably grate.

In the film's favour, Sir David Lean mounted a stately production of the material, brought to life with lavish period detail and the director's exquisite visual sense. Despite its flaws, the movie tells a compelling story with intelligence and grace. The picture set the template for the many Merchant-Ivory adaptations of Forster's works to follow, and remains a standout in the literary period piece genre.

It is also truly wonderful that they can bring classic movies like this right up to speed with the latest that the format has to offer. The video aspects of the film are excellent and Sony Pictures brings you a fantastic high definition re-incarnation of this film. It's one to be proud of for sure and I only wish that the audio had been equally as good. The included extra's make for excellent viewing and add real value to this Blu-ray disc. They've been thoughtfully put together and there is plenty of intelligent comment about the film from both the cast and senior crew. Bring the whole package together and this classic film becomes a totally recommended purchase.

Blu-ray Video Quality - 'A Passage to India' comes to Blu-ray from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Like most of the studio's product, the disc opens with an annoying Blu-ray promo. Apparently, nobody at the studio realises that someone already watching a Blu-ray disc doesn't need to be sold on how great Blu-ray is.

Eschewing the wide CinemaScope grandeur of his most famous epics, David Lean opted to shoot 'A Passage to India' in a standard "flat" theatrical aspect ratio, allegedly to ensure that it would translate better to TV viewing. The Blu-ray is presented in a 1.66:1 European ratio, with small pillar-box bars on the sides of the 16:9 widescreen frame. The 1080p transfer has clearly undergone some restoration work since past home video editions, and looks very good for a Metrocolor production of the era.

The source elements have a little bit of instability, including flesh tones that occasionally waiver from pallid to pinkish. Otherwise, the picture has very nice colour, detail, and texture. The individual beads of sweat on an actor's face are often strikingly visible. Being a Lean film, the photography is naturally quite gorgeous with stunning travelogue-style landscapes. The High-Definition image has a great many scenes of excellent clarity.

On the downside, it appears that Sony has applied some artificial sharpening. Although edge halos aren't a problem, film grain often has a noisy electronic texture. Contrasts have also been boosted to give the video some extra pop, and the results can sometimes be a little hard on the eyes. Nevertheless, this is a fine-looking disc sure to please fans of the film.

Blu-ray Audio Quality - The audio comes in the guise of a 5.1 Dolby TrueHD soundtrack and I was actually a little taken aback by it. For a film of both its style and age I wasn't expecting much surround channel activity but you certainly do get some here. The rears can be filled with strange effects, from the bands playing the national anthem to the echoes in the Marabar caves. The award winning score by Maurice Jarre accompanies the film at every opportunity and leaves you uplifted with a sense of joy. The style of the mix is certainly not unwelcome but I was expecting this to be a front sound space dialogue centric affair. Speaking of which, the dialogue does tend to edge on the tinnier side of things. However, it's not gratingly so and dependent on your set up you may feel that it is fine. Personally I wish it had been a bit more balanced and smoothed. Low end enthusiasts also need not apply here.

Blu-ray Special Features and Extras:

Most of the extras are presented in HD with some of the older material being in the aspect ratio 4:3 format.

Commentary with Producer Richard Goodwin: Richard Goodwin is certainly a fellow who draws his words with measure. The commentary does as a result become rather too slow and as you progress further into the film the pauses between the scenes become increasingly so. He also begins to fall into the trap of simply pointing out the literal of what is happening onscreen. Nevertheless, once you get into his style it's worth sticking with.

Beyond the Passage: Picture-in-graphics track - Calling this feature "picture-in-picture" is kind of misleading. Instead of video clips displayed on top of the movie, at certain moments the entire movie image pauses briefly and then is shrunk down to a small portion of the screen, surrounded by a large border with trivia text notes printed to the side. After a few moments it will pause again and return to normal proportions. The disc case makes no mention of whether this function is "Bonus View" enabled or requires a Profile 1.1 capable Blu-ray player (the unit used for the review does meet that spec). There is no secondary audio to go with the screen graphics. I suspect that this is a simple use of branching, not true Bonus View. It's possible to listen to the audio commentary while this feature is also active, and I recommend that combination to save time. The trivia notes are only mildly interesting and sparsely distributed. Frankly, the whole thing is annoyingly designed. The trivia notes would have been better served to appear as pop-up subtitles.

E.M. Forster: profile of an author [6:54] Peter Jones of Kings College Cambridge simply talks about the writer, his life and his works. Overall it's a very informative and interesting biography of the writer.

An Epic Takes Shape [10:55] The cast and crew re-collect the experience of working with Sir David Lean and what it took to make the movie. Most of it is led by Richard Goodwin and it's once again very measured and informative.

An Indian Affair [13:38] This really follows on from the preceding extra and the crew talk about India itself. What the attractions of this country are and how they went about trying to recreate the feel of the British Raj.

Only Connect: A Vision of India [10:34] Cast and crew discuss the movie once again but matters are a little more intimate here. A lot of recollection in the way David Lean used to do things interspersed with scenes from the movie. The re-creation of India within the Shepperton Studios as well as the cultural reaction to this movie is discussed.

Casting a Classic [11:22] As you would expect the cast talk about how they were approached by Sir David Lean to ask to play their parts in the film. This is all pretty straightforward interview stuff really but sadly both Judy Davis and Victor Bannerjee are missing. A highlight here is when Nigel Havers gives his thoughts on Judy Davis. Hmmm I don't think they got on whilst making this film.

David Lean: Shooting with the Master [13:23] The cast talk about their relationship with Sir David Lean and his style of direction. It's interesting to note that his style was very much from an editorial perspective. He also comes across as a man who knew his own mind and was set in his ways. Who are we to argue? He certainly knew his stuff and delivered it impeccably.

Reflections of David Lean [8:17] Presented in 4:3 format this is taken from VT footage of an interview with Sir David Lean himself. This is essential viewing and you simply have to watch this to appreciate the man and his thoughts.

The David Lean Collection [1:56] A big American Promo Trailer informing us that the following Sir David Lean films `Bridge on the River Kwai,' `Lawrence of Arabia' and of course `A Passage to India' are now available on a 2-disc Special Blu-ray and DVD Collections.

Blu-ray Discs is High Definition [00:30] A massive Trailer for the Sony Blu-ray format.

Finally, I cannot praise this truly classic film `A Passage to India' that brought back so many memories when I first saw this film when it was released in 1984 [gosh where has the time flown by] and I feel the way they have re-mastered this film on the Blu-ray format has made the film look even more stunning when it was originally released. One thing that really shocked me is when you see in the Extras and the people who helped Sir David Lean behind the scenes, where they will tell you that he was such a perfectionist and knew what he wanted out of everyone, especially the Actors, that he actually Edited the film himself and it is NOT credited anywhere and they felt he was robbed in NOT getting an Oscar for Best Editor. But despite this, the film is a totally magical experience and it makes you feel you are actually there and gives you the exotic flavour of India of the time and the way the British Empire treated the Indian people in such a terrible way. So all in all, if you Blu-ray aficionados who have not got this in your Blu-ray Collection, then you are missing out on something truly special and spectacular and now I am proud to add this to my ever increasing Blu-ray David Lean Collection and will give you endless hours of viewing pleasure. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

Andrew C. Miller - Your Ultimate no.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An insight into the Raj twilight, 23 April 2009
A classic film offering a fantastic insight into the days of the British Raj. I recently purchased and watched the DVD. I had not seen the film for some time. Though made back in 1984, it has in no way dated. The acting is wonderful. The film is directed by David Lean with respect and love for India. He gently and perceptively explores the country's weird wonders and its vivid contrasts, not least the mystic character of its ancient civilisation and the callous racism of the Brits who ruled it - for too long. Peggy Ashcroft is supreme, warmly attempting to relate to India. Odd that Alec Guiness was selected to play the role of an Indian mystic - but he rises to the occasion with taste and impeccable style.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars absolutely brilliant, but read the book first!, 19 May 2000
By A Customer
A wonderful evocation of the period, really brings the novel to life. I especially enjoyed Judy Davis as Adela here. I would definitely recommend this, but it is imperative to the read the novel too, for several aspects of it have been changed, and frankly, it's a real shame. So order the two at the same time! It's the best book!
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "India forces one to come face to face with oneself.", 12 Nov 2004
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
In David Lean's last film, his adaptation of the 1924 novel by E. M. Forster, he abandons Forster's strong moral and political stand on the damaging effects of colonialism in India, in favor of a wider ranging, panoramic love story. Although the novel centers on the friendship between the charming and sociable Dr. Aziz (Victor Banerjee) and Briton Richard Fielding (James Fox), one of the few British functionaries who appreciates the Indians as people, Lean focuses instead on Adela Quested's search for adventure, and maybe, love.
Adela (Judy Davis) has come to Chandrapore with Mrs. Moore (Dame Peggy Ashcroft), the mother of her soon-to-be fiancé, Ronny Heaslop (Nigel Havers), the City Magistrate. When Mrs. Moore and Adela accept an invitation to visit the Marabar Caves, Adela, suffers a breakdown of sorts, and leads people to believe that Aziz has made advances. The trial of Aziz exacerbates the deteriorating relations with the local population and initiates a crisis.
Though the film is lushly photographed in many exotic locations, Lean's changes to the novel's plot and themes leave the film without an emotional center. Adela (Davis) is too hysterical and repressed to generate much sympathy, and her desire for adventure stems more from boredom and naivete than from wanting to know the country or its local population. Mrs. Moore (Ashcroft), is a sweet, kind woman, but she is not strong enough to stand up to her son or the British officials who dominate the culture, and when she leaves India, the moral focus of the film vanishes. Aziz, enthusiastically played by Banerjee, makes a major personality change almost overnight, thereby removing himself as the most sympathetic character in the film. Fielding, representing the "nice" British functionary, plays only a peripheral role in the film, and Sir Alec Guiness, in the role of Godbole, an Indian mystic, is a caricature.
More than an hour elapses before the main action begins in this 163-minute film, and there is not enough character development to illustrate Forster's strong political stand. Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, including Best Actress (Davis), Cinematography (Ernest Day), Direction (Lean), and Best Picture, this pretty film secured only two Oscars--Best Supporting Actress for Dame Peggy Ashcroft, as Mrs. Moore, and Best Original Score by Maurice Jarre. Mary Whipple
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Beautiful Blu-Ray Restoration Ever., 5 Oct 2014
By 
H. Hopkins (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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Wow! This has to be one of the finest Blu-Ray restorations out there! Simply astonishing to look at and revealing of the master's great work in all its true glory. Although this US Import version is billed by Amazon as being exclusively Region A, it is in fact all regions, so will play perfectly worldwide.

Passage to India easily parallels with `Kwai', `Lawrence' and `Brief Encounter', and in this reviewer's opinion is probably the best of all David Lean's films. What makes this movie work so well is the perfect mix of all its parts. The exemplary script, the breathtaking power of its theme, the finest ensemble of actors, and the highest possible standards of film making. Set that to a backdrop of Maurice Jarre's fabulous score, easily his finest ever, and you have the rarest contribution to the art of cinema.

Stealers of the show are the effortless James Fox as a kind of older and wiser extension of his character in `The Servant', and the smouldering Judy Davis, one of the most attractive women on earth - then as now. I do however, have one reservation. That of Alec Guinness' blacked up portrayal of the mysterious Professor Godbole. Indeed, this was a reheating of Lean's occasional poor casting judgement when he chose Guinness to play King Faisal in `Lawrence' (the late great Cypriot actor George Pastell would have been the perfect choice). The very Englishness of Guinness made him look somewhat uncomfortable in exotic roles, and his Godbole portrayal unforgivably bordered on the pantomime. Nevertheless, Lean delivers a legendary movie experience that leaves one with that delicious dreamlike feeling of being trapped in the story long after the credits have rolled.

This amazing value Collectors Edition comes with a wonderful gossipy 'making of' documentary and a host of other extras. Click the buy button and relive David Lean's Oscar winning movie as you've never seen it before!

Roger Hopkins
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 21 April 2013
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Absolutely out of this world. Lit up my life and it has never been the same since, grab a bargain and switch on!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Golden Passage, 31 May 2009
By 
D. Bolderson (Reading, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you are into your classics then this is a must. Full to the brim of stars, a must for any collection.
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