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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back in the saddle
I'd given up om them to be honest. Thought they'd become another tired old band trading on past glories. Out of the jaws of defeat, they pull out another 'permanent vacation'. It loses a star because of Joe Perry's awful vocals on two tracks and a lack of quality control which should have made it a ten or eleven track album which would have been a killer. There's some...
Published 22 months ago by Michael Hunter

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars When Two Worlds Collide...
Aerosmith, generally regarded as America's greatest rock and roll band, certainly hyped the release of Music From Another Dimension! to the max.
They delayed the release of the album, 'leaked' some of the songs, featured a couple on their Global Warming summer tour and issued a couple of singles (including the Aero-typical 'Legendary Child').

The leaked...
Published 22 months ago by R. Muir


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Back in the saddle, 6 Nov 2012
I'd given up om them to be honest. Thought they'd become another tired old band trading on past glories. Out of the jaws of defeat, they pull out another 'permanent vacation'. It loses a star because of Joe Perry's awful vocals on two tracks and a lack of quality control which should have made it a ten or eleven track album which would have been a killer. There's some proper rock going on here, not the dross that was served up on 'just push play'. 'out go the lights' and 'street Jesus' are bona fida classic Aerosmith. The ballads have always divided opinion but they are top quality, with 'what could have been love' on a par with 'I don't wanna miss a thing'. I urge all rock/jaded Aerosmith fans to buy it. It put a big daft grin on my face and isn't that what rock is supposed to do?
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A decent Aerosmith album...not as bad as some of the reviews on here, 26 Nov 2012
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R Suchde (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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I felt I had to write this review to counteract some of the very negative reviews. It really is not as bad as some reviews make it out to be, especially after a few listens.

I feel expectations from this album have been too high, what with Jack Douglas producing and the hype that it was going to be a throwback to 70's Aerosmith. This is 2012...that was never going to happen. Instead what we have here is what we should have been expecting...a very contemporary sounding Aerosmith record.

Much of the criticism is based on the number of ballads and generally the amount of filler. It's really not so bad. Yes there are a lot of ballads, but they are quite decent. In fact the one they released as a single `What Could Have Been Love' I believe would have been a massive hit if released during the Get a Grip era. The other ballads are pretty good, except for the Carrie Underwood duet and maybe `Tell Me'. The chorus of `Tell Me' lets it down....it gets very dreary very quickly. It sounds a bit like a leftover from Nine Lives. And as for the Carrie Underwood duet, it is just so un-Aerosmith and un-rock n roll. It would have made for a very decent Carrie Underwood solo song, but it is not Aerosmith and is definitely a track I could do without. But the rest of the ballads are pretty good including surprisingly the Dianne Warren penned number `We All Fall Down'. Sure, it's a bit cookie cutter, but who cares when it is sung so well by Mr Tyler.

The two Joe Perry sung songs really do seem unnecessary, especially the extremely dull `Something'. That's what solo albums are for in my opinion. These two tracks are the only tracks on this album I would describe as pure filler...oh, and the Carrie Underwood duet (in case I have not made it obvious already that I don't like that track!)

Now for the good news. What I think more than saves this album is the fact that there are enough Steven Tyler sung up and mid tempo rockers. There are 7 of them in fact, which if we go back to the days when there were 10 or 11 tracks on an album would have been more than sufficient to satisfy fans. All these tracks are at the very least very good, and some are just excellent (e.g. the awesome `Beautiful', which I think should have been the lead single) with plenty of funk and groove that only Aerosmith can produce.

Sure, the album would have been much punchier and quality filled from start to finish if they had left off the Perry sung tracks, the Carrie Underwood duet and maybe `Tell Me' to make this an 11 track album, but that's what the skip button is for on music players. It seems a shame to have to use the skip button on an Aerosmith album, but we should be grateful for what we have been given. It is a privilege just to be able to hear THAT voice on some new tracks 40 years on from the start of it all. Yes, 40 years! Come on, they deserve huge credit for that.

Anyway, this is just my humble opinion. My message is two-fold...don't listen too much to the negative reviews and don't hold your expectations too high. If you do these things, you will have the pleasure of listening to some great new Aerosmith tracks and it is a such a treat! Overall, I am very satisfied Aerosmith fan. Thanks for reading!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Slice of the Psychedelic Sandwich?, 12 Nov 2012
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K. Roden "Mindquake" (Basingstoke, UK) - See all my reviews
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As usual, the best way to listen to a new Aerosmith album is to listen to it LOUD! Music From Another Dimension is a return to greatness! After a wait of 11 long years for new (original) material, rumours of ructions within the group and fallings out between the Toxic Twins in recent years, there were thoughts among the fans that 2004's Honkin' On Bobo blues album may end up being the last Aerosmith album. Over recent years, we've all been a little disappointed that Aerosmith continued to release various different "Greatest Hits" albums, most of which contained the same songs. This was particularly evident with the releases of "Young Lust", "O, Yeah", "Devils Got A New Disguise" and "The Essential", which have all been released in the years since Aerosmith's last original album Just Push Play in 2001. However, with the release of Music From Another Dimension, i have to say that Aerosmith seem to have found their groove again. I have to say, even as I own all the @Aerosmith albums, Music From Another Dimension is easily as good as the Vacation/Pump/Grip era Aerosmith. Not sure that you can compare it to the early albums like Rocks, Toys In The Attic or Night In The Ruts as the lads have clearly evolved over the last 40 years! From a personal point of view, if I was to compare Music from Another Dimension to another of Aerosmith's albums, I would say that it reminds me of Get A Grip, in the sense that Get A Grip was an eclectic psychedelic sandwich of ballads, blues & rock anthems, Music From Another Dimension is a distinctly Aerosmith album. Some people will always have a moan about Joe Perry's vocal talents, but the track he sings lead on, Freedom Fighter, is a typical Joe Perry track, even if he isn't the strongest singer in the band. He also sings lead on Something.
In essence, the people that will buy this album are the die-hard Aerosmith fans. But this album will also appeal to rock music fans across the world, for its mixture of ballads like What Could Have Been Love and Another Last Goodbye, rock anthems such as Legendary Child and Luv XXX and some true Aerosmith blues-inspired tracks like Something. For me, this is the long-awaited return of the "Demon O'Screamin" and the band that has epitomised American stadium rock for the last 40 years! Here's to another few years...
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Amazing, When the moment arrives that you finally see the Light, 5 Nov 2012
By 
PHILLIP (SKELMERSDALE, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Music From Another Dimension! (MP3 Download)
As as die hard Aerosmith fan and lover of music in general I couldn't have asked for anything better! The album opens Aerosmith out into a new light. Each song gives you something different, Luv xxx the opening track is an absolute classic Aerosmith track, Oh Yeah is an awesome bluesy track with huge depth and it just goes on and on. A definite highlight for me is Out Go The Lights which is just and epic rock and roll song that I could listen to forever with classic Tyler lyrics and Perry licks.

Yes there are tracks that old time Aero fan will hate such as What Could Have Been Love and the Carrie Underwood duet Can't Stop Loving You, but for me I have always been a fan of Aero ballads and they give the album diversity which is always good. In all whether you are a 70's, 80's, 90's or 00's fan of the Bad Boys from Boston there is something for you on this album if you like all their periods this album will give you wet dreams!!!

So far the general press reviews of the album have been terrible many saying the songs sound like they where written by a bunch of guys who wanted to get in and out of the studio a quick as possible because they couldn't stand to be around each other, I say this is exactly how Aerosmith should be sounding in 2012 and if it is the last album for me they are going out with a bang...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aerosmith return to their raw and hard roots, 6 Nov 2012
By 
I. H. Roblin (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
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The music here is as raw as their classic 70s albums and Joe Perry's guitar slams through the air-waves like a chain-saw at times. Even the album finale, 'Another last goodbye', is reminiscent of 'Home tonight' or 'Mia', with the gentle & moving piano chords.

Highlights, pour moi : 'Oh yeah', 'Out go the lights', 'Street Jesus' (a furiously-paced rocker), 'Something' (Joe Perry vocals and out comes the chain saw again).

Like a trip back to the 70s. As promised on 'The Jonathan Ross Show', they will be the last band standing.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars When Two Worlds Collide..., 7 Nov 2012
By 
R. Muir "fabricationsHQ" (Prestwick, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Aerosmith, generally regarded as America's greatest rock and roll band, certainly hyped the release of Music From Another Dimension! to the max.
They delayed the release of the album, 'leaked' some of the songs, featured a couple on their Global Warming summer tour and issued a couple of singles (including the Aero-typical 'Legendary Child').

The leaked tracks, live previews and singles clearly indicated that MFAD! would be a mix of two Aero-worlds - the raw rock and roll of the 70's and the big production sound of the late 80's and 90's.
All knitted together by Jack Douglas, producer of a number of early Aerosmith albums including the critically acclaimed Toys in the Attic and Rocks.

So when two musical worlds collide, is it a successful combination or a mixed musical bag that falls between two stools?
The answer, as it turns out, is both...

'Luv XXX' is a strong opener, driven by the meaty beats of drummer Joey Kramer.
All the necessary Aero-ingredients are present and accounted for - hooky chorus, Joe Perry riffs and a couple of trademark fast `n' punchy lyrical runs from Steven Tyler.
Interestingly, some sections of the song sound like an edgy Cheap Trick, a band that was surely influenced by Aerosmith in their formative years.

The Tricksters are not the only influence - if you heard a five or ten second burst of `Oh Yeah' on the radio you would swear it was a new Rolling stones number.
It's a good little rock and roll song but on MFAD! the good is sometimes matched by the bad or the predictable...

A better title for `Beautiful' would have been `Discordant,' while `Lover Alot' is throwaway out-take riff and roll.
`Out go the Lights' carries the swagger of old, but the bar-room blues 'n' shuffle outro is over-extended and the song loses impetus.

But there are also some stand-out moments on MFAD!
'Street Jesus' is street level rock and roll that hearkens back to the band's early days and may well be the best song on the album.
'Can't Stop Lovin' You' (featuring American Idol winner and country singer Carrie Underwood) is unashamedly countrified pop-rock and the surprise of the album.

But it wouldn't be an Aerosmith album without the obligatory power ballad and this time around we have two: the pleasant but ballad-by-numbers `What Could Have Been Love' and the far more interesting `We All Fall Down.'
The latter was written by Dianne Warren who also wrote the band's biggest hit 'I Don't Want to Miss a Thing.'

'Freedom Fighter' is a pseudo-political rock number with Joe Perry on vocals.
While it's a punchy little tune Perry is not the greatest singer in the world and the song would have been better served by having Steven Tyler at the microphone.
The bluesy `Something' also features Joe Perry's pipes, but the song has no cutting edge and flounders around Perry's weak vocal.

'Closer' also carries a bluesy edge and is a strong, slow-tempo song that would have made for a great finish to the album.
Unfortunately it's followed by the aforementioned `Something' before the album ends with `Another Last Goodbye,' a simply arranged, bare-bones piano ballad.

Having berated Joe Perry's lead vocal attempts it's a little ironic the album ends with a vocally exposed Steven Tyler, whose voice is simply not geared to giving a song such as `Another Last Goodbye' any vocal gravitas.

It's been eleven years since the last album of all-new material form Aerosmith.
And, with the resurgence in classic rock over the last decade and the Aero hard-core starved of material from their favourite rock and roll band, it's an absolute given this will be a Billboard hit and heralded by the fans as a 5 Star success.

There are aspects of the album where the band is truly Back in the Saddle, but the album suffers from lack of quality control and at 15 songs and nearly 70 minutes long the album is not concise or compact enough.
The good songs get lost in the iPod shuffle.

Aerosmith and Jack Douglas should have taken the "less is more" approach.
Because if band and producer had spent more time on that quality control and delivered a 10 or 11 track album of the strongest material (with re-sequencing and tighter edits), they might have delivered what KISS, America's other greatest rock and roll band, supplied the rock world with one month before them...
a Monster album.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Has its flaws, but MUCH better than some would have you believe!, 18 Nov 2012
I am amazed by the bad reviews 'Music From Another Dimension!' has received, both from critics and fans. I think a lot of people have been way too quick to judge this album. While MFAD may not be the masterpiece we might have hoped for, it is a good solid Aerosmith album that offers something for every fan.

This album takes a few listens to get into. First time around, I found it underwhelming, a jumble of tracks that didn't seem to hang together as an album. The fifteen songs veer from (1). Typical Aerosmith fare to (2). Joe Perry songs that sound more like his solo stuff than anything Aerosmith have ever recorded, and then there's (3). The ballads...

1). Some say these sound like Aerosmith-by-numbers, and there's truth in that. 'Out go the Lights' and 'Legendary Child' certainly sound like typical Aerosmith, (Get a Grip era, perhaps). This is not a bad thing. We are Aerosmith fans, after all. Did we really want them to come back after all these years sounding like Deep Purple or Kiss? Of course not. These songs may seem hackneyed at first, but give them a few listens and you won't be able to get them out of your head. The same goes for 'Love XXX' and 'Lover Alot' - Didn't like them much at first, now I can't stop humming them.

2). There are a few Joe Perry-penned tracks that sound like his solo stuff, two of which he sings himself. They aren't typical Aerosmith songs, but so what? Perry has sung some good songs on Aerosmith albums before - if you like 'Bright Light Fright' or 'Walk on Down', you'll enjoy these tracks too.

3). The Ballads. OK, Most Aerosmith fans want to hear rock music, not ballads. I'm no different. There are four big ballads, and you can skip them if you want to; you'll still have eleven new songs to enjoy. If you give them a shot, they're actually not bad. 'What Could Have Been Love' is a decent song - it sounds like a close relative of 'Crazy' and 'Amazing'. 'We All Fall Down' is rather bland, but not offensive. It's the only track not written by the band - its a Diane Warren song, and we all know what that means...

'Can't Stop Loving You' is bound to be the most controversial thing on the album. It doesn't sound like Aerosmith. It's typical country-pop that you would expect from guest vocalist Carrie Underwood or say, Taylor Swift. Your opinion of it will depend entirely on whether you like country music. It sounds like an Underwood song with a guest vocal by Steven Tyler. Is it terrible? No. Is it Aerosmith? No.

Closing track 'Another Last Goodbye' is really rather good. Tyler has never sound so human and so vulnerable. If you like classic Aerosmith ballads such as 'Home Tonight' and 'You See Me Crying', this is their long-lost cousin.

So to sum up, MFAD is overly long and lacks the coherence of most other Aerosmith albums. It sounds like they had so many ideas after eleven years, that they wanted to throw in everything in that they could. But if you're an Aerosmith fan, that won't be a problem. There is something for everyone on this album, and if at first you don't dig it, give the songs a couple of days to sink in.

After eight years without a new album, it is great to have Aerosmith back. Let's hope we don't have to wait so long for the next album!

PS. If you're a hardcore fan, get the Deluxe Version. The live performances on the DVD are great, and you get to hear Tom Hamilton sing lead vocals on the bonus CD!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally & not Disappointed, 11 Nov 2012
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I absolutely love Aerosmith, had almost given up waiting for a new album from them; was hoping for a back to their roots style of music like their 70s records, and I was hoping it wasn't going to be like 'Just Push Play' - I'm not disappointed, it's a great album - I love it already! I've always loved Aerosmith's power ballads at the end of their early albums (Home Tonight, You See Me Crying, & Mia), there are some amazing ones on this album!
I hope Steven Tyler means what he said; "We vow to be the last band standing!"
Awesome album!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Two ballads above its fighting weight but still great..., 17 Nov 2012
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Eleven years. Few bands would survive such a gap between new albums, although we did at least get an album of covers a mere eight years ago, so we're not quite talking guns `n' roses standards here. Even so, eleven years is a long damn time, especially if the last album was the tepidly-received `just push play' and the band in question subsequently spent their time touring, falling out, really falling out on (and off) the stage and even getting involved in American Idol. Still, this is Aerosmith and fans expect a little drama, whilst it's easy to forgive anything of a band that have written and recorded some of the world's most enduring rock `n' roll classics, and the hope was always there that they might erase the ballad-loving excesses of their recent past with a new album, especially following the `Honkin' on Bobo' tour which was widely considered to see the band returning to their blues roots.

So, after all the fights, rumours, threatened line-up changes and tentatively raised hopes, is `Music from another dimension' the album Aerosmith fans have been waiting for? The answer is a comfortable yes for, whilst it is a long album - at least two ballads over its fighting weight - for the most part `music from another dimension' is the sound of a band remembering why they started making music in the first place and having a whole lot of fun in the process. Part of the reason for the band's restored confidence is the return of long-time producer Jack Douglas who does a grand job of providing the band with the glossy sheen they acquired on their latter day albums, whilst making sure the music remains on the right side of rocking (this is the man behind albums such as `toys in the attic', `rocks' and `get your wings' after all) and he deserves credit for making sure that the expensive sheen that coats this album polishes the sound without softening the many blows that Aerosmith land over its duration. Also along for the ride, for one track at least, is the less welcome figure of Desmond Child - but we'll come to him in due course - first of all we have a whole lot of rock to get through.

I'll be honest - I love Aerosmith. Not everything they've done, to be sure, but their early albums in particular are, for the most part, stone-cold classics that can be played anytime and they never get old. I wanted this album to rock - which can, of course, also lead to abject disappointment - and so, when opening track `Luv xxx' kicks off with a huge riff and an appropriately sleazy lyric, it is a moment of pure joy for the Aerosmith fan. Steven Tyler is still one of the greatest singers treading the boards today (if you doubt this claim, listen to `dream on' and be quiet) and the song has the heavy feel of mid-period classics such as `Love in an elevator' - a good start then. The band maintain the pace with `oh yeah', a swinging track with soulful backing vocals that captures the hedonism and naivety of the seventies, a particularly rare quality in these cynical and knowing days. `Beautiful' draws a line between the harder rock of Aerosmith and their more pop sensibilities, offering up a fast paced, hard-rocking verse that showcases Steven Tyler's devastating sense of scat rhythm and a slower, distressingly addictive chorus that will jam itself into your cranium for days after hearing it. `Tell me' is the first of the album's ballads, operating in a similar vein to `I don't want to miss a thing', albeit more subtle in terms of arrangement, and even recalling the Beach Boys in the sublime backing harmonies. `Out go the lights' is a woozy, laid-back rocker complete with cow-bell, bar-room attitude, horns and huge soulful chorus-lines, and it is here that Aerosmith most readily recall their seventies heyday - melodies and attitude effortlessly gelling as Joe Perry and Brad Whitford throw down a succession of gutsy riffs. It's an early highlight of the album and, crucially, whilst the band pretty much throw everything but the kitchen sink at the track, it doesn't sound like they have.

`Legendary child' keeps things moving in a rocking direction, Joey Kramer's drums providing a heavy-duty backdrop to Perry and Taylor's harmonies, whilst tom Hamilton's bass offers a sinister edge to the verses, keeping the band on the dark side while Steven outdoes himself on the verse vocals. `What could have been love' (co-written by Marti Frederiksen - one of the many outside collaborators on the album) is less successful - a sickly, piano led-ballad, it falls on the wrong side of Bryan Adams-style cliché and it sounds remarkably out of place on the record. Fortunately it is not a lasting trend and `Street Jesus' heads straight back into blues territory, the riff that comes roaring out for the chorus pure, vintage, beautifully bluesy Aerosmith. Next up is `can't stop lovin' you', a duet with country star Carrie underwood, which works far better than `what could have been love' and which benefits from Carries rather beautiful tones. However, it is nowhere near as cool as the hard-edged `lover a lot' which has a mean swagger and a memorable chorus to it, the track proving to be another of the album's many highlights.

Time for another ballad, this time written by Dianne Warren, and it's another sickly, sugary effort that does its best to derail the flow of the album with its string-laden sentimentality and it's a relief when it limps to an end and `freedom fighter' (complete with contribution from Johnny Depp) kicks off with a countrified riff and a politically-charged attitude that brings to mind Neil Young's heavier work. `Closer' is a gritty blues song that contrasts a searing verse with a more traditionally poppy chorus whilst `something' is a similarly bluesy track with a southern drawl and you wonder why on earth they left such a brilliant track till near the close of the album. Saved for the grand finale, Desmond Child rears his satanic head on `another last goodbye', and if the title doesn't tell you everything you need to know about the content, then the song-writing credit certainly will. You can't begrudge Aerosmith an emotional closing track, I guess, but why they have to insist on it sounding like the finale to a Michael Bay movie is beyond me, although it has to be noted that Steven delivers a stunning vocal performance.

At fifteen tracks and over an hour in length `Music from another dimension' is largely a very strong album. The ballads are, for the most part, unwelcome distractions from a record that otherwise does a good job of adding to Aerosmith's impressive legacy, but you can't help but wish that the band would learn from past mistakes, have confidence in their own skills and dispense with the hired help. Aside from co-writers, the cast of supporting musicians reads like a telephone book, when all fans really want is for Aerosmith the band to rely on themselves for a change. That said, the ballads are a small price to pay for an album of the overall quality of `music from another dimension' and more often than not you can hear the band recapturing a magic that many feared lost during the years of arguments and ructions that dogged the band in the run up to this release. For faithful Aerosmith fans this album is, largely, a triumph and a fitting addition to a back catalogue that boasts some of the greatest rock albums of the last half century. A touch overlong, perhaps, but then Aerosmith have earned the right to be indulgent if anyone has, and the overall record has a defiant swagger that was hinted at on `Bobo' and which is delivered here with a wry smile and a salacious wink - `music from another dimension' is a richly rewarding experience.

Special edition notes

In these days of deluxe, super-deluxe and extra-super-deluxe, did anyone really think we'd get away without a special edition of the record? Happily the band have decided their coffers are full enough and so we're spared the bank-balance emptying vinyl/wooden coffin/inflatable full-size stage version and instead the album comes as an oversized digi-pack housing three discs and a poster for only a few quid more than the basic edition. For your money, aside from the shiny packaging (and we all like shiny things) the `poster' is hardly worth shouting about (being roughly the size of a computer keyboard it's more likely to inspire mirth than awe), but the extra CD provides a further three tracks including `up on the mountain' which features Tom Hamilton's first ever lead vocal, whilst the DVD provides a beautifully shot four track live set (including a blistering `train kept a rollin'' featuring Johnny Depp), a rambling conversation with Tyler and Perry (which makes you wonder what on earth they were like on drugs) and some basic but reasonably informative interviews with the band members. As extra features go it is hardly earth shattering, but the live footage is truly remarkable and the bonus tracks an enjoyable coda to the album. `Smith fans will undoubtedly have opted for this version already, but for the uninitiated or unconvinced it may be preferable to go for the single disc version, rather than splash out for some rather basic extras.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We all fall down, 2 Sep 2013
By 
What a splendid record! I have given this a few listens now and I think it is a highly enjoyable listen with some fantastic songs on it. The frenetic opener 'Luv xx', The Stones influenced 'Oh Yeah' the rollicking 'Out Go The Lights' and the fast paced 'Lover Alot' are some of the personal highlights on this album but I also enjoyed the ballads 'what could have been love' and 'cant stop loving you'. Sure these love anthems are a tad cheesy but its enought to melt a couple of icicles on this frozen heart.

Joe Perry provides some awsome guitar licks on this record such as the stand out 'Legendary Child' with its superb blues infused rock riff that carries the song superbly. I also enjoyed the 2 songs that feature Joe Perry on vocals 'Freedom fighter' and 'something'. It's refreshing to hear his distinctive voice after the screams and howling of Steven Tyler and gives the songs a seriousness that the subject matter calls for, especially on the former song as it contains a political message aimed squarely at the US Governments recent war on terror. The album ends fittingly with a nice piano ballad that tugs on the hearts strings and closes the record out neatly. I would recommend this album to anyone who appreciates past Aerosmith music or anyone who likes rock music made with passion and great guitar licks.
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