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4.4 out of 5 stars
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4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 22 August 2013
I would not describe myself as being the target audience for this book. I am in no way spiritual or Zen, and have frequently been guilty of dismissing the ideas associated with books like this.* That said, I can't pretend to have come through this book unscathed. I do find myself being more mindful and calmer than before, plus as a committed runner, some of the breathing exercises you end up doing are great. You may even find, as you read, that you're using controlled breathing to focus your attention on what you're reading.
The most important part of this book for me, is the underlying lesson, important regardless of who you are; that an essential part of being human is the ability to determine for yourself what is important in life and what is not, and let the unimportant go.
I'm half expecting the principles in this book to lead on to a kind of Zen Theory of Everything. But as it stands, this is a book that makes the world a slightly better place than it was before it was written. Which if you ask me, is pretty Zen.

But I still think it would have sounded fine to say `Fewer' in the title.

*My original review of this book, of which I am less than proud, can be found in the comments section of this review, where you will also see an example of the author putting theory into practise.
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on 18 September 2013
This is a great little book to give you simple practical advice on how not to complicate your life if you stick to the Zen philosophy. Hey it really works but don't try too hard because that is not Zen .Enjoy and may peace be with you.
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on 27 December 2012
This book is very helpful. Clear advice throughout. Have bought another of Andrew Daley's books ("Find inner peace in 30 seconds") as a result.
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on 4 June 2013
Excellent brief insight to ZEN FOR explorers, with some very interesting suggestions for simple meditations to alleviate angst. Most enjoyable read.
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on 9 December 2012
Overall a good read, won't say a knockout. Puts the rather deeply philosophical aspects of Zen and Tao in simple to understand statements drawn from the author's own day to day life experiences. Last couple of pages don't really say anything that hasn't been said in the preceding chapters.
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I purchased the Kindle edition and found it easy to read. I really like the way Andrew Dailey (the author) writes. So easy to understand and very concise without lots of waffle. It is the first book of his that I have read and I will definitely be recommending it to those attending the Mindfulness courses that I teach.
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on 6 June 2014
There are some practical tips for Zen style stress relief in this book, but one part made me question the authors understanding.

"We have pointy teeth as well as flat teeth" which is the authors only excuse for eating meat. Now agree or disagree with meat eating, the fact that humans are biologically herbivores (I wont explain it all here, do your research) seemed to escape this author. Also they seem to want to justify eating meat by saying it's organic and free ranged, a system that has no regulation and means nothing PLUS contributes to just as much death and pain.

For someone who claims to be a Buddhist, the author seems perfectly fine with encouraging a lot of pain and suffering.
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on 14 February 2014
A Simple, easy to read book full of practical tips for ordinary day to day living. Simple language for someone like me, a novice, to understand. I liked the style of writing, references to other practises such as Christianity and Taoism and tips which are easy to follow.
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on 4 February 2014
This book is well written and is what the title says it is. It is a "tool box" of very useful techniques that will be an asset to anyone who is looking for the way to help themselves. A short reference that should appeal to all readers. Highly recommended.
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on 12 June 2014
If you're anything like me, you're reading the reviews to see if it sways your decision to buy. I would say that the fact you are reading this stems from an interest in Zen. No matter how small or seemingly insignificant your interest is, it's enough to read this precise and insightful introduction to Zen.

This title includes bonus material which introduces Tao, a similar philosophy to Zen, Buddhism and Zen Buddhism. After thoroughly enjoying the main content, this Tao chapter became my favourite as it gives you a nudge in the right direction should you be inclined to explore further.
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