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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 13 February 2013
This DVD was a must-have for me after seeing the documentary at one of its special screenings at the movies.
And watching it on a television screen doesn't take much away from what is a fantastic viewing experience.

It's a great overview of the Stones' rich history, taking the viewer through the many transformations of the stars, full of humour, wit and fabulously rock'n'roll tales.

It's filmed in such a way that often you feel as though you are right there - whether it's feeling the exultation at Madison Square Garden or a real sense of fear at the infamous Altamont Speedway concert.

Narrated by the voices of the Stones as they are today lends some great hindsight and insight to the historical footage.

I can't recommend this DVD enough to all Stones fans and those looking for an introduction to these musical greats.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 January 2013
This is simply a list of the Extra Features on the Region 2 (U.K.) edition of the Blu Ray version.
1. Two live performances including film of the band getting off the plane and leaving in a car at Munster,West Germany 11th September 1965,
the live tracks are: 'Satisfaction' and 'I'm All Right' (There is some great footage of Brian Jones playing live here)
All this film is in very good quality black and white and is all filmed with multiple cameras (one on stage) and has reasonably good sound quality for the year. (this all runs for a total of 08:36)
2. Interview with Director Brett Morgan (this runs for a total of 10:48)
3. The Sound And Music Of Crossfire Hurricane (this runs for a total of 05:30)
4. Theatrical Trailer for Crossfire Hurricane (01.06)
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41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
on 27 October 2012
If you buy one Rolling Stones DVD - Make it this one. A true labour of love produced my Mick Jagger himself; Crossfire Hurricane is now officially THE definitive Stones documentary. Although there are a plethora of Stones films out there, mostly excellent, this is now the one to get. Although it's not a concert film, you do get full tracks and live excerpts from various concerts throughout their fifty year career, from very early television appearances playing early blues tracks like Little Red Rooster to later era classics like Miss You. The documentary covers the band's full career, although it does focus mainly on their best era, 64' to about 72', looking at everything from line up changes to drug busts. Surprisingly, one thing it didn't focus on were the actual records themselves, there no comments on the making of classic records like Beggars Banquet, Let it Bleed or Exile on Main Street, but this is not bad thing, as there are countless DVDs that look at this in depth already. Throughout the film, you get bits of old interviews, as well as archive pictures and home film. Starting off right at the begging, you get a small insight as to what life must have been like for the Stones in the early days through revealing commentaries all of the bands surviving members. The new interviews are audio only, which is actually a good thing, as instead of repeated cutting back to whoever is speaking; the film is free to show concert film. Really, if you are Rolling Stones fan, you have to own this. Forget the rest of the stuff released to cash in on the bands fiftieth anniversary; this is the one to get. It's a superbly made documentary that ranks up there as one of the best docs I've seen in a long time, and is a must own for fans of the band. This isn't all the Stones you need to own though, their early concert film Rock and Roll Circus is essential watching, and Stones in Exile is an interesting watch if you want a doc specifically on what many consider to be the Stones' best record, Exile in Main Street.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 7 October 2013
As a potted history of the the Rolling Stones early days through to their megastar status today, this is an unmissable DVD!
The birth of this Rock'n'Roll phenomenon is shown in nitty gritty detail! Plenty of early days film footage including stacks of back stage clips! Genuinely unmissable!
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36 of 42 people found the following review helpful
It is high time for a look back on an illustrious career that has famously had more than its fair share of sex, drugs and rock n' roll. However, those looking for a Beatles Anthology-esque examination will be disappointed. This is more ramshackle than that, much like the band themselves. This is a concise one-off film of only 118 minutes. Considering it took director, Brett Morgan, four months to wade through the archive footage (with assistance from co-producer, Mick Jagger), it is a shame that he hasn't been minded to create a more sprawling work, befitting of the Stones' lengthy career. In fact, the documentary ends abruptly at around 1977, and offers nothing after this date, save for closing credit live footage of Exile On Main Street track 'All Down The Line' lifted from the 2008 film, Shine A Light.

Opening with colour backstage footage and a live rendition of 'Street Fighting Man', attention soon turns to the early days, and the maelstrom that consisted of live performance in the early and mid-60s for the Rolling Stones, with the incessant screaming and stage invasions. Emphasis is firmly placed on what it must have been like have been within this vortex, having to deal with a rapid ascent and devotional teenage girls (England) and boys (the rest of the world).

Whilst discussing the early period, coverage is given in a frank manner as to the band's feeling about the demise of original band member, Brian Jones. Whilst acknowledging his talent, it turns out that the band felt a degree of inevitability over his eventual death. Even though an element of mystery hangs over the drowning, Jones' relationship with drugs is well-known (Godard's film, Sympathy for the Devil, shows an induced and distracted Jones in the studio). As matters arose, the death came only two days before a free Hyde Park gig in front of 500,000 people - a gig that would mark a baptism of fire for new guitarist, Mick Taylor, and also act as a remembrance for Jones. Drummer Charlie Watts recalls Mick crying in the corner of the dressing room on the day of the performance. By contrast, Keith states that his reason for not going to the funeral is because he didn't want to make it 'a circus', and that he didn't even go to the funeral of his own mother and father.

Arriving at the late 60s, there are compelling scenes offered up by the Altamont stabbing of Meredith Hunter, but these are taken from the previously released feature, Gimme Shelter. This time around, however, it is enhanced by comments from the band looking back, which is illuminating seeing as it has since been perceived as the incident that killed the hippie dream and the anti-Woodstock.

Although the archive footage is interesting, there is not necessarily a dearth of unseen live material. The narrative itself is loosely played with, especially at the start, diverging down different avenues whilst vaguely seeking a chronological path (of sorts).

There are some interesting revelations contained within this documentary that will interest fans. For example, Mick Taylor finally provides the reason as to why he left the Stones. Jagger himself concedes that he did not know or understand why, and Taylor goes on to explain that during the early 70s, he was falling into heroin addiction.

Bill Wyman also distills what he believes is the sound of the Rolling Stones. Bearing a theory to Richards oft-quoted opinion that many bands can rock but not many can roll, he points towards the sound as being a consequence of Charlie's decision to follow Keith's lead, which means that the drums come in slightly behind the guitar, which is unusual in itself, whilst Bill's bass would be slightly ahead. Wyman describes this as leading to 'a wobble' effect, where things could fall apart at any given moment.

There is some interesting black and white footage of Mick and Keith writing material together in what is either backstage or in some sort of hotel room. Having an insight into how they worked together on the verge of what would be a particularly prolific part of their career is fascinating. Keith later voices opinion that of all the songs they wrote, 'Midnight Rambler' would be the essence of the Jagger/Richards writing partnership. He states a belief that anyone else could have written any of the other tunes, but only he and Mick would have thought about making an opera out of the blues.

Coincidentally, much like that tune, this is certainly a film goes on a ramble of its own. Starting in slightly messy fashion, like a band tuning up after a short time apart, and taking a while to lock into the groove. As far as flaws go, no reference is made at all to Ian Stewart, which seems a glaring omission considering this is an overview of the Rolling Stones' career and all the significant players. His distinctive piano work enhanced songs such as 'Brown Sugar', amongst many others, and his lack of appearance in this documentary feels unfair and a missed opportunity. Also, there is no real detail on the relationship the Stones had with manager Andrew Loog Oldham.

Introducing the film, Jagger congratulated Brett Morgan for managing to cover 50 years of the Stones in a couple of hours. Well, he hasn't managed that. He has covered 25 years pretty well, but with some gaping holes. Whether this is down to the Stones' reticence in opening up, or a lack of probing is anyones' guess.

I know it's only a rock n roll film, and you might not necessarily love it, but you'll probably like it.

for more film reviews: toomuchnoiseblog.com and [...]
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I really enjoyed this BluRay. The editing is seamless. There is a lot about Brian Jones and even Mick Taylor. The footage is great and flows really well. I like the way the story is told with members of the band telling their story.
The picture quality is great, sound is clear and well produced.
The fact that the story ends at the end of the 1970s is interesting. One thing I noticed how the last 5 or so years is covered in only 10-15 minutes which shows how much emphasis is covered to the 1960s era of The Stones.
Overall this is a great film that tells us their story. A must get if you are a fan.
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on 2 August 2015
This is great. I saw it at the cinema on the 'one night only' thing as I'm a huge fan so had to get it. Only two things, one nerdy. Firstly, why stop when it did? We need a Stones Anthology like The Beatles did, covering everything. Well, maybe not 'Dirty Work', but certainly more than there is here. The nerdy one, the bit where Brian Jones leaves this world - it's touching how upset Mick seems (after so many years of seemingly not really caring) but the footage of the lads looking glum is from the studio in America (Mosely Shoals??) where they recorded Brown Sugar & Wild Horses after Brian had died - it is heavily implicated in this film that this is footage of them just after they'd heard about Brian, recording in London; it ain't. Bit naughty. Anyhoo, this is the best documentary about the Stones yet - but we need more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 12 January 2013
If you don't understand why the Stones always will be the best band in the world, buy this and watch it. For those that didn't live through the times, this will explain what it was like to have done so.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 29 January 2013
If you know nothing much about The Stones, this is a good primer for the first 15 years of the band. 25x5 is better but harder to find (and not on DVD).

The footage has mainly been seen before, certainly by hard-core Stones fans. There ARE previously unheard versions of well-known songs (PLEASE!! a soundtrack). There are no video clips, and no album covers, yet these are available elsewhere.

Hours of interviews were completed for the doco and we've ended up with about an hour and 40 minutes of material from all surviving Stones-- as well as bits and pieces from existing interviews with Brian Jones (nothing from original member Ian Stewart).

No Oldham and no Klein. No Keyes, no Price, no Leavell, and no Darryl Jones. This is fair enough because how many people are you going to fit into such a relatively short bio? Including anyone BUT the band would've confused things, because the format is no talking heads, just voices.

Bill Wyman is back, as he should be because he kept the history. One of the best aspects is having Mick Taylor along. His much-awaited interview material wasn't in 25x5-- aside from historical footage, he only appeared via a photo and statement. He comes clean, saying it was drug addiction that forced his departure from the band (while this is discussed in some Stones books, it's never been talked about in detail in a Stones doco). Sadly, there's almost TOO much focus on this, and not enough is said about the brilliant guitar playing which made The Stones from 1968-1974 so untouchable.

Also unmentioned is Taylor's well-aired belief that he should've got more writing credits. Wyman, who's also mentioned this publicly more than once, also fails to raise it here.

What's disappointing is the lack of other major revelations. In the 'making of' interview, it's hinted that there WERE a lot of things said that didn't make the cut. Jagger should've had the guts to hand it ALL over and let others use the interviews to tell the story.

While it's nice to see a more-than-due return to the fact that it was Brian Jones' band, Jagger's slip-up about when he died is a very curious part of the film. Jagger says he couldn't remember how long it was after the band kicked him out, suggesting it was "months". The interviewer pulls him up and says it was three weeks.

To leave the mistake in the doco suggests Jagger cared so little for Jones that he never thought it through. It comes over as callous. Or it could just be an honest mistake. Either way, it shows that Jagger doesn't dwell on the past as much as some feverish Stones fans do.

And maybe that's the point. And perhaps that says a lot about the structure, motivation and form of the entire doco.

###
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on 31 March 2013
I loved this documentary on the Stones. Within the constraints of it's broadcast time, it managed to unearth rare footage of the early Stones with Brian Jones, explore his era and the transition to the incomparable Mick Taylor era (the high-water mark for the Stones as a touring band) and the further transition to the Ron Wood era. That era is really both the Stones at their lightest yet most commercially successful, as they were no longer seen as an 'outlaw' band but as an efficient touring machine, albeit with a spotty track record as a recording unit. The DVD is reasonably priced and well worth the price.
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