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415
4.7 out of 5 stars
The Tower
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:£4.49
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
I only found the previous two books fairly recently, so I didn't have to wait too long for it to arrive on my kindle. I really wanted to make it last but I just had to keep turning the pages. Now there isn't another one to look forward to, and I can only hope the author doesn't decide these were the only books he had in him
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on 17 May 2013
Last year my hubby was looking for a birthday prezzie to get for me from the cats and saw "Sanctus" in Morrisons. He read the description and thought I'd like it. No I didn't - I LOVED IT. For Christmas he bought me "The Key" and I gave not-very-subtle hints for "The Tower" for my recent birthday.

It's hard to believe that these 3 books are from a debut author.

All three books have short chapters which are fast paced and despite how tired at night you are you just have to read one more chapter, and perhaps just another. You get so caught up in the story and in the characters.

The sign of a great book is when you can't put it down, you just have to keep reading as you really want to know what will happen, but you are gutted when you get to the end as there is no more left to read - finished. These three books tick all the boxes.

I know I haven't written much about the storyline in the books, but to be honest I don't want to spoil anything for those for have not yet had the pleasure to read them.

What great films these books would make.

Simon Toyne also runs his own facebook page and replies to any comments posted on his wall. I hope he continues this as his success grows.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 May 2013
The story was easily picked up even though I hadn't read the previous books. Good momentum throughout and I didn't expect the "baddie" to be who he was.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 8 May 2013
What a series of books. If this could only give hope for our own future. Definitely will be recommending all Simon Toyne to friends and other readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 May 2013
Found the first of this trilogy, sanctus, in a supermarket and thought id try it, so glad I did and have read part 2 the key and have been eagerly waiting for this last book to find out the ending of a gripping story, I had never heard of simon toyne before but have to say i am so pleased to have found another brilliant writer. I'll be looking out for more from him in the future.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 22 April 2013
And here endeth the lesson in how to write a really good religious conspiracy thriller, as The Tower brings to a close this excellent trilogy. Beginning with Sanctus and The Key, this final instalment instantly propels you back into the world so succinctly and powerfully portrayed in the first two books. I instantly took to these books, despite my original and somewhat cynical poo-pooing of this genre, thanks to the scars left by reading other less effective authors of this kind of fare. I can safely say that I had no such qualms as having read Sanctus in pretty much one sitting, and then champing at the bit for The Key, I awaited this closing book with a sense of anticipation and it did not disappoint...

Trying to avoid spoilers for those who have not yet had the pleasure of reading the full trilogy, The Tower draws on the perilous and unresolved events at the end of the previous books, with the present time juxtaposed with a catch-up on events eight months previously until the two timelines converge. As our erstwhile hero Gabriel grapples with a torturous journey back to the sinister auspices of The Citadel at Ruin (the predominant setting of the first two books), our heroine Liv is left to deal with the increasingly bizarre events in a desert wilderness as an ancient prophecy begins to gather muster, heralding the possible End of Days. In the present timeline there are some devilish deeds going on within the confines of NASA with the sabotage of two major space exploration programmes at the hands of what appears to be religious fantics, but is there more to it than meets the eye and are there greater powers at work? It falls to a rookie FBI agent and his surly superior to unravel the mystery leading to a denoeument linking all the characters and interlocking plot threads together.

Other reviewers have commented on the slower build-up of this book and I can see their point, but I actually enjoyed this sense of the plot gathering a momentum, and felt my own tension for the characters ratcheting up at the same speed, also noticing my reading speed increased substantially as the book reached its conclusion, so found this all rather clever. I must confess that I found the NASA plot utterly fascinating and enjoyed the fruits of Toyne's research into this particular field of science and technology, enjoying the exploration of the age old argument of science vs religion as the plot unfolded. With this new plotline set predominantly in America, and the skilful interweaving of the pre-existing locations and story from the first two books, fear not if you have come to this series anew with this book, as the back story is coherently referred to throughout so you won't miss anything. On the strength of this one alone the impetus will be there to seek out the other two books post haste!

I think one of the major strengths of this series has been the excellent standard of characterisation, and although The Tower gives Toyne the chance to further flesh out some familiar figures, the introduction of some new faces further illustrates his adept hand at this. I particularly took to newly qualified FBI Agent Joe Shepherd and his boss Special Agent Benjamin Franklin and the nature of their professional relationship with the seeds of distrust between them sown by some unspoken secrets of Shepherd's past. There was a real depth and believability to their working and personal interactions and bolstered by the existing strength of the recurring characters, I was completely drawn into these people's lives and tribulations as the plot played out. There is usually an inherent failing within this genre of matching the strength of characterisation to the needs of the conspiracy thriller pace and plotting, but Toyne experiences no such problems in balancing the needs of both with an assured grip throughout.

In conclusion then, I would highly recommend The Tower, be it as a conclusion to you having read Sanctus and The Key or equally if this is your first foray into Toyne's writing. An exceptional thriller that left me with a slight wistful air that the series was now finished. Can't wait to see what's next!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I waited with baited breath for the third instalment of this very different and absorbing story. It was well worth the wait. The characters are so believable and you are tantalisingly kept waiting on tenterhooks to see how it is all going to pan out. One only wonders what Mr Toyne will come up with next to keep us glued to the written word.
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on 18 August 2013
I have to declare myself. Simon is my son. I read The Tower twice in its development and writing stage and then again in a pre-publication form. I have now read it again in its published book form and, although I must own up to some bias on my part, I found this last reading of The Tower just as riveting as the first. I like a good read and I am never without a book on the go. My tastes are quite broad from: Lee Child and Michael Connelly to William Faulkner and Earnest Hemingway, all authors whom I have read with considerable pleasure and have closed their books with mixed feelings of satisfaction and regret that I had come to the end. The Tower, which is the final book of the Sanctus Trilogy left me with exactly these feelings. If you want a book that will keep you turning the pages and make you want to enthuse about to your friends then pick up The Tower. Better still, pick up Sanctus and then The Key, which are the first two books in the trilogy. You will not regret it.
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on 23 September 2014
I found this book just as captivating as the first!,Makes you want to feel that there is hope out there for us all, whether you believe in ANYTHING or not. The parallel between faith and science was well written and thought out. I think one of the major strengths of this series has been the excellent standard of characterisation, and although The Tower gives Toyne the chance to further flesh out some familiar figures, the introduction of some new faces further illustrates his adept hand at this. I particularly took to newly qualified FBI Agent Joe Shepherd and his boss Special Agent Benjamin Franklin and the nature of their professional relationship with the seeds of distrust between them sown by some unspoken secrets of Shepherd’s past. And here endeth the lesson in how to write a really good religious conspiracy thriller, as The Tower brings to a close this excellent trilogy.
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on 22 December 2013
I haven't a clue why I bought 'The Tower', because I don't normally like Dan-Brown-type stories where ancient scrolls are discovered and weird sects that have lain dormant for centuries suddenly come to violent life. There are plenty of readers who do like that kind of thing but I'm not one of them. I should never have picked the book up.

But I am giving it 4 stars because the writing is so damn good. In other books of the kind which have sold in their billions the quality of writing is vastly inferior to this book: in 'The Tower' it is vibrant, the characters have so many dimensions you feel you can see into their soul, and Toyne writes with such a subtle understatement that I was utterly bowled over.

This is very clever and skilful writing indeed; if I was an aficionado of this kind of plot, I'm sure I would have awarded it the full nine yards.
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