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163 Reviews
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73 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect synopsis of the Batman/Joker relationship
I'm not sure where this story is supposed to fit in the greater Batman legend, but it pretty well sums up the relationship between Batman and the Joker, as well as providing some insights into their origins.
As usual, the Joker has escaped and gone on the rampage, but this time he has decided to take revenge on all the key characters that he believes have caused his...
Published on 1 Mar 2004 by C. Verspeak

versus
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You're Killing Me!
Many plaudits have been thrown at Alan Moore's take on The Joker's backstory and I can see why. What Moore does well is to demonstrate that both Batman and The Joker have suffered similar tragedy but channelled their emotions differently. Where as Batman uses his parents death as a means to drive his desire to protect (made easier through the financial and loving support...
Published on 5 Oct 2009 by Tubby


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5.0 out of 5 stars See, there were these two guys in a lunatic asylum..., 19 Nov 2014
When you think of Batman one of the first villains, if not THE first, that springs to mind is The Joker. It’s fair to say, he and Batman have history. The Killing Joke, in my opinion, is their greatest encounter.

Reading through all the other reviews, The Killing Joke should be applauded for being thought-provoking. I’ve read several different opinions on what’s going down, each as interesting as the last. The Killing Joke is not a clear romp from A to B. It’s dark and muddy.

My opinion is that The Joker is trying to prove a hypothesis that, like him, anyone can be twisted given the right circumstances. The test subject for this hypothesis is Commissioner Gordon, who is subjected to some extreme trauma. Batman, who has used his own circumstances as empowerment, defeats The Joker and disproves the hypothesis.

The Killing Joke is a seminal Batman tale, helping to better define both Batman and The Joker. It is dark and thought-provoking. Undoubtedly 5/5 Stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still not funny, 8 Feb 2014
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I read this when it was first published in 1988, and remember being disappointed by it, especially as the ending didn’t do anything for me. Reading it again 25 years later, it still doesn’t do anything. It is an excellent comic nonetheless, but other people have covered the same ground since, and with better jokes – see Ed Brubaker’s Batman The Man Who Laughs TP (Joker), which I read just before rereading this. At the time, this was heralded by DC Comics as a major event, but the creators later said that they were ‘just’ writing a Batman story, and that DC Comics decided to make it out to be something much bigger than they intended, in order to ride on the Watchmen bandwagon. Whether this was so, or just an excuse for not having another masterpiece, I have no idea. And of course, it might actually be a masterpiece, and it is me that is missing the joke…

THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE

This is the origin story of the Joker, told in flashback, as he once more escapes from Arkham and goes on the rampage, shooting Barbara Gordon - putting her in the wheelchair, where she has remained until the New 52 - and kidnapping Commissioner Gordon in order to drive him mad, to prove that it isn’t his (the Joker’s) fault that he kills people, but that it could have happened, at random, to anyone… Batman of course disagrees, though the joke is (possibly) that his parents’ death did in fact send him off the rails, but in a different direction to the Joker. We also see in the flashback, the man who originally put on the Red Hood, how he met the Bat-Man, and ended up in the state that we see him today: Nature versus Nurture, perhaps, or just strength of character showing through for one, but not the other.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, 2 Feb 2014
Good quality and had be jumping up and down like a child. Delivery time wasn't quite good as well as well as the packaging.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece!, 4 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman: The Killing Joke (Deluxe Edition) (Kindle Edition)
I love this book, great story and great art work! its a masterpiece, I like reading about the jokers origins!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, 30 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Batman: The Killing Joke (Deluxe Edition) (Kindle Edition)
There are no faults in this graphic novel, not in art work, script or characters. It's inspired me (not in a crazy joker kind of a way) to do something like this with my life, create a study of an extreme mind that only lives in fiction... or does he...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars like batman, 28 Dec 2013
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never saw this book when looked on site ,but wife got it for me.and was surprised at gift.look forward to reading it
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliance, 8 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman: The Killing Joke (Deluxe Edition) (Kindle Edition)
Absolutely seminal batman story, it's well presented in this format and very accessible I'd definitely read again (and I will)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, 10 Sep 2013
One of the greatest comics I've ever read, but a little disturbing at times. I never understood the 'two lunatics in an asylum' joke
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still not funny, 19 Jun 2013
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I read this when it was first published in 1988, and remember being disappointed by it, especially as the ending didn't do anything for me. Reading it again 25 years later, it still doesn't do anything. It is an excellent comic nonetheless, but other people have covered the same ground since, and with better jokes - see Ed Brubaker's Batman The Man Who Laughs TP (Joker), which I read just before rereading this. At the time, this was heralded by DC Comics as a major event, but the creators later said that they were `just' writing a Batman story, and that DC Comics decided to make it out to be something much bigger than they intended, in order to ride on the Watchmen bandwagon. Whether this was so, or just an excuse for not having another masterpiece, I have no idea. And of course, it might actually be a masterpiece, and it is me that is missing the joke...

THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE

This is the origin story of the Joker, told in flashback, as he once more escapes from Arkham and goes on the rampage, shooting Barbara Gordon - putting her in the wheelchair, where she has remained until the New 52 - and kidnapping Commissioner Gordon in order to drive him mad, to prove that it isn't his (the Joker's) fault that he kills people, but that it could have happened, at random, to anyone... Batman of course disagrees, though the joke is (possibly) that his parents' death did in fact send him off the rails, but in a different direction to the Joker. We also see in the flashback, the man who originally put on the Red Hood, how he met the Bat-Man, and ended up in the state that we see him today: Nature versus Nurture, perhaps, or just strength of character showing through for one, but not the other.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the joker dude is sure a mean foe, 17 Jun 2013
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Top story from Alan Moore of Batmans old Joker enemy ' it's another Batman novel must have for me '
one of Batmans top five novels for me
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