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5.0 out of 5 stars wiundows 8
bought as a gift for my father so presuming it was what he wanted not heard back yet ty anyway
Published 1 month ago by correana cumberbirch

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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works best when you pretend it's windows 7
I only bought windows 8 because its OEM licence is much better than windows 7 in the fact you can transfer the licence across hardware configurations (motherboard changes).

That aside I am using Windows 8 with Stardock's Start8 add on that basically turns the desktop mode into windows 7, with all the improvements that windows 8 brings there too.

I...
Published 14 months ago by Straga


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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works best when you pretend it's windows 7, 27 May 2013
This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
I only bought windows 8 because its OEM licence is much better than windows 7 in the fact you can transfer the licence across hardware configurations (motherboard changes).

That aside I am using Windows 8 with Stardock's Start8 add on that basically turns the desktop mode into windows 7, with all the improvements that windows 8 brings there too.

I hardly use the metro mode or its apps at all, but the under the hood improvements to the OS as a whole make it faster and very pleasant to use on an SSD with all the performance that brings.

Bottom line, if you are planning on building a new system Win8 is the way to go, as there is a large lack of retail windows 7 licences at the time of writing. As long as you use win8 with an addon such as Start8 or similar you will be just fine.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good operating system with less than useful interface, 3 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
Microsoft have produced a good Windows operating system and ruined it by crudely attaching a tablet interface to it that is useless for desktop PC users.

It appears that Microsoft have gambled on a "one size fits all" strategy with this OS. While it may be true to say that one size will indeed fit all, it does not mean that it is better than having sizes tailored to the individuals' needs. Sure, I can wear an "XXL" T-shirt from Benetton with a flower on it if I have to, but given the choice I'd prefer to wear a black, medium sized T-shirt because I'm more comfortable in that.

For desktop PC users, some argue that Metro gives Windows a fresh, pretty look, while others find the large tiles, often mostly empty with minimal text, somewhat ugly. I for one dislike the way nearly all the Metro displays are cropped off at the right edge of the screen. It looks terrible. Aesthetics aside, Metro is ultimately an unnecessary encumbrance to accessing the desktop and desktop applications, especially if you don have a touch-screen. There is little reason to use Metro apps on a desktop because they are optimised to run on tablet devices, rather than utilise the massive processing power available on a desktop PC or laptop. This means the Metro apps are lighter and simpler than mainstream Windows applications, often lacking in more advanced functionality. This problem is compounded by the fact that currently there aren't many quality apps available from the app store. I was looking at the Metro Skype app recently, and found it to be nowhere near as good as the Skype client for the desktop. As usual, half of it was missing off the screen, and what was on the screen was a massive waste of space due to empty looking boxes. It also insisted on my merging account with some other long disused account and suddenly I found myself sifting through dozens of old contacts that I thought I'd deleted long ago. Function-wise, the Skype app was poor. My camera would not work with it and it did not allow multiple connections. Why on earth anyone would want to use this version on a desktop PC, when they have the opportunity to use the full version, is beyond me. I deleted it quickly.

Just in case you thought you'd be clever and stick to the desktop in Windows 8, and ignore Metro, Microsoft have made sure that you can't. The system boots to Metro and you can only access the desktop from that interface by clicking on the tile or by using the keyboard shortcut. Once on the desktop, you will quickly find out that there is no start button, otherwise, this environment has a new clean look and a number of improvements. This seems like the real Windows 8, hidden away under the trendy new interface, with its start button confiscated. Actually, there are some nice features in this new desktop, that are certainly improvements over previous versions. I wish Windows 8 had just been this, with a start menu!

The key to understanding Windows 8 is to realise it is two different operating systems and clearly distinguish what each system looks like and how each system works. Unfortunately Microsoft, rather than taking steps to help the user clearly see this distinction, seems to have chosen instead to do the opposite and try to blur the distinction between the two systems. For example, the name itself, Metro, would have been useful to keep, if only for identifying the new OS in discussions and guides, yet Microsoft dropped it. A start button on the desktop would have allowed desktop users to remain in a familiar and productive environment, and keep the systems separated that way, but Microsoft took it away. Indeed, Windows 8 seems to try very hard to get you back into the Metro UI at every opportunity. For example, shortly after I had installed Windows 8, I downloaded an Excel file that I wanted to open. I wanted to see if Windows 8 had any built-in means of viewing it so I right-clicked on the file on the desktop to bring up the usual context menu, but when I clicked on Open with, a white dialogue box appeared asking me if I wanted to try to open it with an app from the app store. Remember, only Metro apps are available in the app store. Confusing.

I can only wonder what the average computer user will make of all this.

On a more positive note, almost every good review of Windows 8 mentions a performance increase and faster boot time. Indeed, besides the less obvious technical improvements under the hood, performance seems to be a noticeable advantage for desktop users.

I installed Windows 8 32-bit on a four year old HP 6730s Notebook that had previously been running Vista. Previously I'd had a few BSODs on this device with Vista, the battery was dead, and keys were missing and yes it's had quite a battering. In fact I was about to give up on it but then I decided to take advantage of a special offer on Windows 8 and give it a try. Surprisingly, installing Windows had never been easier nor quicker, and once the installation was complete, everything seemed to work without the need for me to go looking for drivers. Even the built-in HP camera on the lid worked. And I was surprised to find that my wireless printer, a HP Photosmart B110, also worked, without the need for any drivers. And yes, everything seemed much faster and more responsive, with no BSODs to date. This has undoubtedly been a positive experience.

I'm not sure how much of the performance increase was due to Windows 8. Fresh installations are usually faster than older ones. I remember when I first installed Windows 7 on a brand new desktop, it booted very quickly and seemed very fast, but since then I've added a lot of software, including many programs that load at start-up, and this has slowed down my Windows 7 PC somewhat. While I believe there is a performance increase in Windows 8, I think it is misleading to compare the performance and boot-time of a newly installed Windows with an old installation of Windows.
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1.0 out of 5 stars My wife loves win 8 but I think its tripe ..., 15 July 2014
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
My wife loves win 8 but I think its tripe so I'm giving it one star because I can and Microsoft deserves it :p
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5.0 out of 5 stars wiundows 8, 2 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
bought as a gift for my father so presuming it was what he wanted not heard back yet ty anyway
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good OS but frustrating to previous windows users without some help., 16 April 2014
By 
Quilty (Bedford, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
I bought this OS to run as the only OS on a Macbook Air for someone who wanted the light and powerful Apple hardware without having to relearn 20 years of using MS software. It was fiddly to install on the MBA, but there are reasonable 'how to' guides out there. It is critical in my opinion that you use add on software to restore a W7 style start button. This prevents much pain for users (and calls for support people!). I use the Startisback software, but there are a number out there.
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16 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent (updated 20 Feb 2013), 13 Dec 2012
By 
G. Mackey - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
First, I must thank Dan for his review & assistance. I was unsure about this 64 bit full version, but I considered his advice & bought it. I have already reviewed the 32-bit upgrade version ( see 'A curate's egg?') & I liked it a lot. The downside for me is that it wasn't a 'clean' install.....It had to be loaded onto an existing Vista or W7 32-bit platform & thereby is it's Achilles heel; it just isn't reliable enough &, even after a full Vista/Seven/8 installation, still fails to start or shut down predictably. Having stated that, I still think it's well thought out & a major improvement over Seven.

The 64-bit Pro full version is advertised for System builders only, & that worried me a bit. Forking out over 110 for something that may not work didn't inspire me, but after reading Dan's review I bought it. I need not have worried; it installed & activated just fine.

My own PC has a Solid-State 'C' drive, & that always means trouble when I carry out a virgin install. It always shows error messages if HDD's are left connected & won't load the new platform. The only way past this is to unplug the power leads from the HDD's & it will load the new Windows flawlessly. The same thing happened here too, so I carried out the disconnection process, deleted the 'C' drive & reformatted it to ensure it was totally clean of old installations. W8 setup kicked straight in & was complete within 15 minutes.

With W8, you register an account with Microsoft, so as soon as setup completed & I logged in, all my personalised settings were automatically transferred to my new W8 platform. This is one of the features that I like about W8: you're ready to go within minutes of completing setup. Most of your driver files are installed automatically, & I love the fact that I don't have to reload the Motherboard drivers now, as that takes an eternity to complete. I downloaded Media Centre on my 32-bit version, & all I had to do was enter the codes & it transferred to the 64-bit version without a hitch.

Probably the biggest visual differences are the new screens: The welcome screen is well thought-out & requires a mouse-click to enter into the password screen. Once your password is verified, a 'charms' or apps screen appears. This screen has a basic set of apps, such as weather, news, etc; you need to decide whether you want to add extra apps at this point; there are apps that you can download either free or at a charge. There are sports apps, games, financial apps & a whole lot more available to you.

Once you have personalised your charms screen you can select any of the icons & work from there, or you can right-click & see all of your PC options, which you can also add to your charms for ease of use. You also have a Windows 7 style screen without the gadgets bar. You can add a third-party gadgets bar if you like that option (I did), but why didn't Microsoft offer it anyway? With the Windows 7 screen, you can use your PC as normal & add your favourite programmes; e.g Nero, Word etc, & create shortcuts to both your Win 7 screen & your charms screen. The power-off is a bit of a pain to use, as it needs a steady mouse-hand to find it. I downloaded a shortcut onto my taskbar for power-off & it's much easier to use.

I also thought that I would have major problems with my existing programmes as some are very old & they had always been run on 32-bit platforms. I need not have worried: the only ones that have caused problems so far are the ones that also caused problems with the 32-bit W8. Samsung Magician 3.1 & 3.2 are prime examples of this (see VERSION 4 at the end of this review). However, this 64-bit full-version has a compatibility wizard that actually works properly! When the Samsung programme (plus a few others) failed to load, W8 entered compatibility mode & they loaded without any further hitches. One note of caution is that the 2000 & 2003 versions of Microsoft Office won't load onto W8: you need 2007 onwards for this or an alternative programme such as Open Office (available from Ebay for about a fiver, & works very well).

Performance-wise, this version is definitely quicker than the 32-bit W8: it's not a lot faster, but the speed improvement is perceptible, particularly when multi-tasking. It uses all of the 8Gb of RAM that I have, as opposed to using a maximum of 3.25Gb on 32-bit W8. I guess it would utilise even more if I decided to fit it.

I don't do much gaming, but MOHA runs as sweet as a nut now. It ran well before, but this is one of the programmes that show a significant improvement on 64-bit. My AVS4YOU programmes show the biggest improvement though: the Video Converter wouldn't work at all with 32-bit W8, & was as hungry as hell with processor, drive & memory on W7. This works like a charm now & conversion is now a simple task & not a chore. I can even multi-task several other programmes simultaneously, which caused problems previously.

If you decide to change your operating system to W8, I would recommend you to obtain a touch-screen monitor. Certainly, you do not need to buy one, but if you use the apps screen a lot then it really helps to have one, as this allows some of the better features of W8 to be used. I still use the mouse when I am using the desktop, but increasingly I use the touch-screen for apps. Also, a SSD really allows W8 to perform at it's very best: the whole ethos of W8 is that is fast & easy to use, & a good SSD is really the only way this functionality can be fully utilised. I have a 32-bit W8 backup drive which is installed on a SATA2 HDD, & it doesn't generate anywhere near the fluidity that the SSD does.

So there it is; you pay the money & make your choices. W8 isn't everyone's cup of tea, & I totally accept the views of the sceptics. Certainly, Microsoft have still a lot of work to carry out to improve the functionality of the platform, but they are continually updating it & they have made good progress since the launch. I like the 32-bit version & I absolutely adore this 64-bit Pro version. I won't be so crass as to try to persuade you into buying something that may not be what you want, but the reviews are becoming increasingly more positive, & I for one, am positive that it's the best Windows yet.

(Update, 20.02.2013)
One of the issues that I had with both versions of W8 was that it would not start reliably. Sometimes the Start Screen flags would depress without anything happening; sometimes it would boot into the old W7 screen & there wouldn't be any icons, rendering it useless. Shutdown was also affected. There wasn't a lot of help out there regarding this problem, but now I know that there are quite a few users who experience it. The start-up speed at 5-7 seconds is phenomenal, & thereby is the source of the problem. Without going into areas I don't fully understand, it seems that W8 remembers data from previous shutdowns & bridges this into a rapid start sequence (apologies to any expert reading this). This rapid start may not always be reliable & can cause the issues described. If it happens with your own installation, you can regress to a W7-style normal start by un-flagging the rapid start as follows:-
1.Control panel-
2.Power Options-
3.Choose what the power buttons do-
4.Change settings that are currently unavailable-
5.Turn on fast start-up.
(Un-tick the 'Turn on fast start up')
This will take you back to a longer start up; around 30-40 seconds on my PC, but the issues should have disappeared. I hope Microsoft are addressing this problem as a matter of urgency.

VERSION 4
Around 17th of March 2013, Samsung released version 4 of their Magician optimisation software. This works perfectly with Windows 8 & has effectively eliminated the problems encountered with versions 3.1 & 3.2. One interesting new feature of version 4 is that you can tune your SSD for performance OR reliability: if you choose reliability, it automatically disables Windows 8 fast start function, saving all the hassle of going through the manual procedure as described in the previous paragraphs.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear!, 3 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
Microsoft have got Windows right twice in recent years in my opinion: once with Windows XP and then again with Windows 7.

Alas, Windows 8 is a turn for the worse. The operating system is trying to be all things to all devices and in doing so it fails miserably as a desktop operating system. I can't speak for how it works on devices you can prod with your fingers as I haven't used it on one of those, but I can only presume it's a bit better on those.

Microsoft need to take a leaf out of Apple's books in this one. Apple are the king of finger-prodding devices with the iPad and iPhone, which they kit out with IOS, yet they recognise the different needs of a keyboard and mouse-driven desktop device and provide OS X for that purpose. I should point out that I'm no Apple evangelist (in fact I made a career of programming Windows). Or at least I wasn't until Windows 8 drove me to get my first MacBook Pro and the relative sanity that is OS X.

I have no problem with innovation and I've "moved with the times" all the way from from Windows 3, through the 9x releases, ME, 2000, XP, the laughable Vista and finally the rather good Windows 7. My dislike of Windows 8 has nothing to do with resisting progress; it's simply that I don't think it's a particularly good desktop OS.

I've been generous and given it 2 stars because, if you play around with it enough, you can - often by chance - figure out how it works and get things done. It's a largely unsatisfying experience though.

Back to the drawing board please Microsoft.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A game changer...and may be not for the better., 2 Feb 2013
This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
A good, solid operating system ruined by intrusive privacy issues and a tablet interface stuck on top of it.

Microsoft have finally decided to fundamentally change the architecture of Windows in order to steer its users towards fullfilling the corporation's long term stategic business plans. The changes in Windows 8 have little to do with giving desktop users what they need - they are about Microsoft achieving its own goals of market dominance and power. Ok, Windows 8 may not force users to use the online log on, the SmartScreen filter, and the new "Metro" interface, but the architecture is there, poised and ready, and the users are being channel into using it. This approach is a typical migration tactic used by corporations like Microsoft. If you're wondering what the SmartScreen filter is, it's something that checks what software you are installing and using, and which Microsoft can uninstall if it contravenes their new, heavy-handed EULA. It's not really your computer to do what you want with anymore. Consider it to be desktp PC, transforming itself into an oversized iPad, complete with its proprietary "app" store.

Not only are there proprietary and privacy issues affecting Windows 8 users. I am a long time user of Microsoft products and have been using Windows since 3.11 days. I have invested a subtantial amount of money in Windows based software over the last decade or so, and more importantly a lot of time learning how to use all this software. It almost becomes a way of life, so ingrained to the point where I had come to take the flexibility and openess of the Windows platfrom for granted. Windows 8 threatens that I must drop all that and start over, simply because some bean counters there have come up with a new idea they think is "exciting". To me, it feels like it's been forced down my neck. You may say I have a choice, but do I really? What choice would that be? The choice not to accept a EULA, and abandon the platform and legacy of Windows dependant software that I need for my job? It is not a choice because there is no viable alternative. And yes, I'm angry.

Will be sticking to Windows 7 for as long as it seems reasonable to do, and hopefully things will have changed for the better by then. That depends on you. I'm not optimistic. Sorry for the rant.
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28 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Forget what the pedants say - This is a great product!!, 10 Nov 2012
By 
Dan (Caerphilly, Caerphilly United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
I feel the need to correct the barrage of negative reviews that people are publishing about Windows 8. Before I start, I would like to say that I am not a Microsoft employee or fanboy - I am just a humble IT user.

Let's get the reason why people are moaning about Windows 8 out the way now. Put simply it requires you to spend a bit of time learning a new interface. That's it. If you don't want to learn a new visual user interface, then this OS is not for you. However that is not a good enough reason to rubbish the product.

Windows 8, is stable & reliable as it is built on Windows 7 technology. I am running it on three different machines (my ancient Ubuntu Linux laptop is even running it through a Virtual Machine). It has not crashed once, and indeed it is running faster than under Win 7.

All my peripheral devices have run perfectly fine with no conflicts. There is an absolute multitude of new & useful features (the new 'ribbon' in Windows explorer is brilliant & saves much time). The desktop is still there and it is very easy to find files and programs. One concept new users will have to grasp with is that Windows has moved away from a browse-point-click method of opening objects to an intelligent search method which requires to type the names of objects instead. Once you 'get' this, search becomes much, much quicker.

The start screen is quite frankly a refreshingly new take on the boring, staid static icons on a screen approach. Whilst I would like to see more customization options I think the start screen looks and responds fantastically. Yes the Windows app store is limited at the moment, but it will very rapidly be populated with some astonishingly new technologies. It is growing bigger every day. People need to be a bit more patient. When Apples store opened it too was nowhere near as well populated as it is now. As it is, I have installed about 20 apps and found most of them to be very, very good (that is for another review in another place).

Finally I would like to say that those who say you cannot use Windows 8 on a desktop with a mouse are talking nonsense. Full mouse functionality is there - you just need to get used to hovering the mouse in the bottom left-hand corner of the screen (for the start screen) and the bottom right-hand corner (for the charms menu - the settings/search options). And if you really, really can't do without the start menu, third party apps exist for about 4.50 that will install a start menu for you that behaves in the same way the old one did.

All in all I have found Windows 8 to be a very good product that will only get better. And I for one am grateful I can have a fully fledged, powerful PC operating system that I can use on every device in my home and when on the move (i.e. tablets/phones, etc). You cannot say that for any Android/iOS/OSX/Linux device out in the market today. People have two choices: embrace the future with Windows 8 or stay rooted to the past. Most people don't like change - but it is inevitable.

What was it Darwin said?
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20 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Windows 8, 3 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 (DVD-ROM)
I was very disappointed with Windows Vista (so many NW overheads and less stable than XP) but enthused by Windows 7 64 bit which is stable and quick.

Although fast I was disappointed with Windows 8. Lots of sub menus and functions are only accessible through slide in menus that appear when the mouse pointer is dragged to the side of the screen. The only problem is that the slide in menus don't always appear when they're supposed to. Additionally the OS doesn't have the feel of a new radical fully fledged OS - it feels more like Windows 7 refronted for tablet PC and touch screen devices. For non touch screen users I wouldn't recommend Windows 8. The advantages are too few to justify an upgrade from Windows 7.
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Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955
Microsoft Windows 8 Pro 64 bit OEM, FQC-05955 by Microsoft Software (Windows 8)
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