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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Capote: "Perry and I grew up in the same house, and one day he went out the back door and I went out the front."
This brutally honest portrait of author Truman Capote, with its stunning photography (by Adam Kimmel) and Academy Award-winning acting, has been one of the most "decorated" films of 1995. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar-winner as Best Actor, becomes Capote in this film--small, effete, and vulnerable, but also selfish, petulant, weak, and sometimes cruel. Catherine Keener,...
Published on 3 May 2006 by Mary Whipple

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars I was bored rigidly by this movie in spite of its acclaim ...
I was bored rigidly by this movie in spite of its acclaim b y the critics and gave it away to my local charity shop-sorry!
Published 4 days ago by james kelly


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Capote: "Perry and I grew up in the same house, and one day he went out the back door and I went out the front.", 3 May 2006
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
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This brutally honest portrait of author Truman Capote, with its stunning photography (by Adam Kimmel) and Academy Award-winning acting, has been one of the most "decorated" films of 1995. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar-winner as Best Actor, becomes Capote in this film--small, effete, and vulnerable, but also selfish, petulant, weak, and sometimes cruel. Catherine Keener, as Harper Lee, Capote's childhood friend, offers a stunning contrast to Hoffman's Capote. Tall, honest, and committed to keeping Capote focused, she grounds the film, while serving as Capote's research assistant during his investigation of the cold-blooded killings of four members of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas, in 1959.

At the opening of the film, the clean, flat plains and unadorned farmhouse belonging to the victims form a visual contrast with Capote's frantic life in New York. A naive teenager's discovery of the murders, the savagery of the murders, and effects of the murders on the townspeople continue the contrasts between the harsh realities of local life and the esoteric lifestyle of Capote. When Perry Smith (sensitively played by Clifton Collins, Jr.) and Richard Eugene Hickock (Mark Pellegrino) are arrested, and Capote makes contact with Smith, the viewer suddenly sees Capote and Smith as similar--both lonely, sad, a bit shy, and sometimes frightened. As Perry Smith begins to confide in Capote, the similarities of their backgrounds and dysfunctional families become even more obvious.

Exceptionally opportunistic, Capote is also deeply affected by Smith, feeding him when his hunger strike leaves him close to death, but also borrowing Smith's personal journals for his research because "I don't want the world to see you as a monster." Sometimes abandoning Smith and Hickock for months at a time, Capote comes and goes in their lives, leaving Smith desperate at times, and causing Jack Dunphy, Capote's lover, to accuse Capote of using Smith. As the six years pass between the crime and the publication of In Cold Blood, Capote himself deteriorates from alcohol and drugs as inexorably as Smith and Hickock have done while awaiting execution.

The interactions between Hoffman, as Capote, and Collins, as Smith, lead to poignant scenes of great emotion--Capote dissembling when Smith wants to know the name of the book he is writing, Capote refusing to pay a visit to Smith until just before his execution, and Capote crying "I did everything I could," when clearly he did not. Intensely acted, sensitively directly, stunningly photographed, and hauntingly human, this memorable film takes a close, personal look at Capote and the man he fears may be his alter ego. Mary Whipple
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The cold blooded writer, 13 July 2008
By 
O E J - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
Roger Jon Ellory, who dedicated his masterpiece 'A Quiet Belief in Angels' to Truman Capote, urged me to see this film and within a few minutes of the start I could see why. I wanted to see it before I read the novel on which it is based, IN COLD BLOOD. This movie is not a lifetime biopic; instead it covers what were surely the most important five years in the life of one of the greatest American writers of his time, which he dedicated to writing what would become his last completed novel - although it was classified as non-fiction as it was based on real events.

I think you would benefit from a prior knowledge of Capote and who he was in order to enjoy this film. I can imagine that anyone knowing nothing about him might find it all rather uninteresting. But anybody with a curiosity to know more about this enigmatic, gregarious and highly intelligent man should find it captivating, due in no small part to the portrayal by Hoffman, who probably took a big risk by accepting the part because if he had got it wrong he could have been ridiculed for years. For example, there's Capote's very unusual voice; I must admit that I opted to have the subtitles switched on because I found it difficult at times to understand what Hoffman was saying, but later on when I watched the very interesting 'extras' on the DVD - which included an interview with Capote himself - I realised that the reproduction of his voice was remarkably accurate. It must have been very difficult to speak like that without sounding camp, but Hoffman never does. But the bigger insight into the character of the great man is discovered when the viewer realises that the relationship he has been developing with a convicted murderer on death row has been highly manipulative despite its origins of a sympathy and understanding for a young man troubled and isolated, as Capote clearly had been earlier in his own life. Basically, Capote wanted to control the killers' stay of execution to suit his own means, and when he eventually felt able to complete his book after more than four years in the making, and when he felt that he might have a nervous breakdown if it could not be finished off soon, he had the power and influence to speed up the execution. So the irony is that while the title of the novel leads you to think only of the ruthlessness of the killers, there is something of a double-entendre that Capote may or may not have been aware of: his own cold-bloodedness at determining how long two men should live, and when they should die.

It's hard to think of any other actor playing the part of Truman Capote, and there can really be no question that Philip Seymour Hoffman was a worthy winner of his Academy Award for Best Actor. He absolutely made this film what it is, although mention must be made of a perfect supporting cast and high-quality screenplay and direction.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You may not admire Capote, but Philip Seymour Hoffman gives a great performance, 4 Oct. 2007
By 
C. O. DeRiemer (San Antonio, Texas, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
At the start of the movie, I would have given a lot to be standing next to Truman Capote at his party, both of us half drunk, listening to his anecdotes and trading quips with him. At the end of the movie, I wouldn't have wanted to be in the same room with him.

Capote is a major motion picture, in my view, with a great, mesmerizing performance by Philip Seymour Hoffman as Capote. Hoffman doesn't just mimic Capote's languid lisp and effeminate mannerisms. He captures the man's drive, his ambition, his empathy, his charm, his determination to get what he wants. What Capote wants is to write a book, and the book is going to be the story of the slaughter of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas, by two drifters, Richard Hickock (Mark Pellegrino) and Perry Smith (Clifton Collins, Jr.). The two broke into the Clutter's home because they'd heard there was $10,000 hidden. They tied up Herb Clutter and his 15-year-old son, Kenyon, and took them to the basement. They tied up Bonnie Clutter and the 16-year-old daughter, Nancy, and left them upstairs. After searching the house and finding no hidden cash, Hickock intended to rape Nancy. Smith stopped him...but then slit Herb Clutter's throat and used a shotgun to blast his head. Then Smith used the shotgun on the son, the mother and the daughter. They left with only about $50.

Capote and Harper Lee (Catherine Keener), a friend acting as his assistant, travel to Holcomb and spend three months talking to everyone they can find, from Alvin Dewey (Chris Cooper), the cop in charge, to the teen-agers who knew the young Clutters. After Hickock and Smith are captured, Capote develops a strange, almost intimate, relationship with Smith. "It's as if Perry and I grew up in the same house," he says at one point, "and one day he went out the back door and I went out the front." He is writing what he knows will be a great book, but it can have no ending until Perry finally breaks down and tells him what happened the night of the killings. And it still will have no end until, all appeals having failed, Hickock and Perry are hanged. Years go by. To get this story, Capote will use and manipulate Perry, a man more vulnerable than we might think. Capote lies to him, uses emotional blackmail, perhaps even believes himself some of the emotions he is displaying to Perry. But all the while, Capote's ambition and ruthlessness to write his story never waver, no matter how emotionally wrenching it has become for him. Of course, he does get the story, Perry and Hickock are hanged and In Cold Blood becomes one of the masterpieces of American literature.

Hoffman manages to evoke a reluctant admiration for Capote. If you've ever seen the photo of Capote used on the dust jacket of his first novel, Other Voices, Other Rooms, there is no doubt that the man is flamboyant and amused by people's reaction to his distinctiveness. There's also no doubt that as a teen-ager, Capote probably was unmercifully treated by his peers. One can't help but admire Capote's talent and his single-mindedness, or be repelled by his willingness to do just about anything to get the story and write his book.

Hoffman gives an extraordinary performance. Also excellent are so many others in the cast, particularly Chris Cooper, Clifton Collins, Jr. and Catherine Keener. If In Cold Blood is a book worth reading, Capote is a movie worth seeing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A portrait of a great writer!, 25 Mar. 2014
By 
Amazon Customer (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] [2005] (DVD)
I saw this film simply because I love the book 'In Cold Blood' by Truman Capote. I also very much enjoyed the movie of the same name, and to a much lesser extent, the made for television adaption in 1996, which I think should be avoided at all costs.

'Capote' is a portrait of the writer Truman Capote, a very complex and eccentric man. It provides an excellent insight into the process that went into writing one of the best books I've ever read, and for this alone, I would recommend it to anyone who has also enjoyed reading the best-seller.

Called upon to report about about an horrific murder case which killed off an entire family at their home in Kansas, Truman (played by Philip Hoffman) and his writer friend Nelle Harper (Catherine Keener) travel to the scene of the crime and interview key players in this tragedy.

He also befriends the murderers, Richard Hancock, and in particular, Perry Smith. Capote sympathies with Smith as both men led difficult childhoods. He had originally planned to write one article, but decides to instead pen a full length book. His compassion for the prisoners is contrasted to his other feeling, that he needs them to be executed so that his book can have closure. 'In Cold Blood' was a masterpiece, but it was to effect Truman Capote for the rest of his life.

Philip Hoddman is outstanding as Capote, and is well supported by Catherine Keener. The film is essentially a celebration of a very talented writer and an insight into how he almost obsessively got to know two very evil men, but it is also a very sad story as Capote was clearly a very troubled individual behind his happy exterior.

The DVD also includes a short documentary about Truman Capote, featuring archive footage and new interviews with people who knew him.
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5.0 out of 5 stars one of the great performances on film, 15 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
This is a good-looking, very efficiently made film that is distinguished by the great central performance of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote. As fine as the rest of the cast is, it's pretty much a one-man show, and Hoffman's Academy Award for best Actor was thoroughly deserved. I don't know whether Hoffman represented Capote accurately or whether this account of the researching and writing of "In Cold Blood" is strictly accurate. These questions don't matter -- this isn't a documentary and it isn't a biopic. What matters is that as you watch this movie you absolutely believe, from moment to moment, that this mixture of ego, vanity, manipulativeness, self-dramatization, professional pride, intelligence, cowardice, and, yes, empathy hangs together as a very particular and odd human being. Some viewers might be reminded of Janet Malcolm's controversial book of 1990, "The Journalist and the Murderer," about the journalist Joe McGinniss's dealing with Jeffrey MacDonald, which opens with the famous statement "Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that what he does is morally indefensible." That could stand as a statement of part of the interest of "Capote" too, although in Seymour Hoffman's performance, it's the obviousness of the blend of honesty and dishonesty, empathy and cold-eyed detachment that is striking. He will lie shamelessly to Perry Smith (Clifton Collins Jr.) about the title of his work-in progress as well as about his visit to Smith's sister ("Your sister misses you."), and yet he will go back and see Smith more than he needs to for his purposes, and he convinced me at least that his telling Smith about the similarities between their childhoods was not only manipulation -- although Capote, as played here, is certainly intelligent enough to understand that it IS manipulation too. And although Capote had already made his name as a novelist and short story writer, it is as a journalist that he works here, looking for truths about what happened and the two men who were responsible for the Kansas murders. I don't think that the movie allows the easy conclusion that Capote's failure to achieve anything as a writer after "In Cold Blood" was a result of his shameful self-awareness of bad faith in his dealings with Smith particularly. It seems to me just as likely that the idea that fiction could not capture anything as strange, horrible, detailed, and yet still human made it difficult for him to go on with it. But we just don't know -- and if Perry Smith remains mysterious in the movie, and his motive for killing unclear, equally unclear are the reasons for Capote's "decline."

If the movie doesn't settle the question of the reasons for Capote's subsequent failure as a writer, and even if guilt at his manipulativeness might be part of it, there's a revealing moment when he can't cheer up at a party to celebrate the movie of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" -- yes, that now-iconic movie. He says to himself, "I don't understand what all the fuss is about." Sour grapes at the success of an old friend? Maybe -- his own book is still a work-in-progress at that point, and he has not yet heard Smith give his account of the murder. But he knows enough and has written enough to know that he is writing a weirder and perhaps better story, one that isn't so obviously tailored as consoling myth, one that speaks to the heart of darkness that Lee's novel, vivid and well-meaning as it is, just doesn't get at. Harper Lee is played by Catherine Keener; she goes to Kansas with Capote to help with the research, and in the movie she serves as a comic deflator of his more egregiously self-important posings. But she isn't, I believe, "the conscience of the movie," as is said in one of the "special features" accompanying the DVD I saw. What she says is true enough -- but she tells Capote nothing that he doesn't already know and is willing to accept the consequences of knowing. When Capote says, near the end, "I couldn't save them," Lee responds, "Truman, you didn't even want to"; but Capote never claimed to want to, and it doesn't occur to Lee that there might be other ways of "saving" them than just from the gallows. He doesn't spare them in the book either. Perry Smith is the murderer with whom we see Capote interacting, and he remains a mystery, as he should. We hear his sister's very negative take on him, and we suspect that the manipulation is not a one-way street between the two. Smith, interestingly, is presented as a kind of artist himself -- verbally very self-aware, and a gifted pencil-drawer. They need one another, one could say, but the question of understanding is another matter. But the journalist's business is to render, and that's what Capote understands, and is one reason why, perhaps, he says what he says about "saving."

Visually, the movie is very well shot, with the contrast between both the exteriors and interiors of Kansas posed against each other and against Capote's home bases in Manhattan and southern Spain. Capote is odder in Kansas than elsewhere, with Chris Cooper as the lead detective Alvin Dewey almost by his physical presence emphasizing that oddness. But he's odd wherever he is, and the physical transformation that Hoffmann achieves in gesture, posture, and voice, consistently carried through, is one of the great pieces of acting of recent decades.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ... and I went out the front, 24 Feb. 2014
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] [2005] (DVD)
"In Cold Blood" is one of the most fascinating works of American literature -- a book that blurs the boundaries of fiction and nonfiction.

But the writing of the book is almost as fascinating as the events that inspired it, especially since the two became intertwined. This forms the core of "Capote," a fascinating look at the writing project that overwhelmed Truman Capote's life -- and while the movie is quite solid, it's the late Philip Seymour Hoffman who truly shines.

Writer Truman Capote (Hoffman) sees a small article in the newspaper, about a family who has been murdered in Kansas, and is immediately inspired to write about it for the New Yorker. Along with his friend Harper Lee (Catherine Keener), he sets out for Kansas and begins interviewing people who knew the Clutter family. They even get to know Alvin Dewey (Chris Cooper), the detective on the case.

Then the murderers are caught -- a pair of troubled thugs, Perry Smith (Clifton Collins, Jr.) and Richard "Dick" Hickock (Mark Pellegrino).

Suddenly Capote is inspired to take his story far beyond its roots, and his New Yorker story begins to blossom into a full-length book. As he interviews the two men, a warped bond begins to form between Capote and Smith, whom he sees as a kindred spirit.... even though he hasn't revealed how his book will be written. But as the years and legal battles go on, he becomes more determined to finish it at last.

The late Philip Seymour Hoffman won an Academy Award for his performance as Truman Capote, and it isn't hard to see why. He seems to slip into Capote's skin -- his looks, his high nasal voice, his fey mannerisms -- but he also fills the cracks with lots of genuine emotion. His Capote is both vulnerable and manipulative -- and thankfully, director Bennett Miller is intelligent enough to realize that neither eclipses the other.

On one hand, Capote seems to feel a true connection to Perry, as if they are two sides of the same coin -- in one scene, he plaintively tells Harper Lee that he and Perry came from the same house, and that he went "out the front door" while Perry was forced to leave via "the back." But the movie doesn't shy away from the suggestion that Capote manipulated the convicted men to get the book he wanted, although the extent is left ambiguous.

And as the movie winds on, Hoffman's Capote seems to be slowly crumbling under the weight of his magnificent book that he's producing, as if it's vampirically sucking out his vital juices. At the end, he's emotionally and creatively spent, adrift, left only with the reflections of his darker self.

As a recounting of "what happened," the film is actually pretty close to the reality of what happened -- it follows Capote closely as he winds his way through the Kansas town, with Harper paving the way before his feet. Miller mostly depends on Hoffman for atmosphere, letting him fill the scenes with emotion or intensity -- but he brings a tautness to phone calls, a darkness in the executions, and a sense of barely-restrained violence when the convicts are onscreen.

The other actors are all pretty good, although they are effectively window dressing for Hoffman -- Catherine Keener is the only one who truly rises above the herd, depicting Lee as a sharp, smart, incisive woman whom Capote leans on.

"Capote" is one of those movies that is elevated to brilliance by the presence of a truly great actor -- and the director's delicate, nuanced touch with Capote's psyche doesn't hurt either.
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4.0 out of 5 stars capote, 13 Feb. 2010
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
Who and what was Truman Capote? I bought this DVD to find out. The enigma remains for many people, including myself. What made him an icon in literary societies in the nineteen fifties and especailly the sixties following the publication of his novel:'In cold Blood'? This film(DVD)answers some of those questions: it covers his obsession with writing the truth about horrendous multiple murders in western Kansas; it covers many aspects of Capote, the man: his goal to be popular, to become associated with the literary elite; his passion for fame, for truth and honesty. Yet, he is a lonely man, haunted by personal demons, clings to people, especilally Nelle Harper Lee on whom he is dependent throughout the investigation. Capote is depicted as a competent investgative journalist. But was he a literary giant? That question will be debated for decades. What is not in doubt is that he will remain a signifciant cog in the history of the US literature. A talented man with never-ending drive; a person thriving for supreme recognition. his mind a dark cloak covering a constant fight to overcome a massive inferority complex. The actors and the production team of this DVD portray the man, his friends plus the society of that period with subtlety.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Capote, 19 April 2009
By 
Spider Monkey (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
`Capote' explores the life of Truman Capote as he wrote his most well known book `In Cold Blood'. It follows him as he befriends one of the killers of a horrible murder and gains his trust to get information for the book. Capote (the man) comes across as narcissistic, egotistical and manipulative and yet you can't help but also find him at times both charming and funny. The film also looks at his friendship with Harper Lee and how they supported one another's literary careers. Philip Seymour Hoffman deserves every accolade he received for this film and his performance is spell binding, you are truly riveted by his every look and inflection. You may not have the most respect for Capote by the end of this film, but as far as bio-pics go this one is outstanding. If you've read `In Cold Blood' then this makes for interesting and relevant viewing and if not then I highly recommend you do so, it is an incredible piece of writing and puts this film in greater context. A film that is deserving of all it's praise and well worth a look.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Capote: "Perry and I grew up in the same house, and one day he went out the back door and I went out the front.", 3 Jun. 2006
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
This brutally honest portrait of author Truman Capote, with its stunning photography (by Adam Kimmel) and Academy Award-winning acting, has been one of the most "decorated" films of 1995. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar-winner as Best Actor, becomes Capote in this film--small, effete, and vulnerable, but also selfish, petulant, weak, and sometimes cruel. Catherine Keener, as Harper Lee, Capote's childhood friend, offers a stunning contrast to Hoffman's Capote. Tall, honest, and committed to keeping Capote focused, she grounds the film, while serving as Capote's research assistant during his investigation of the cold-blooded killings of four members of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas, in 1959.

At the opening of the film, the clean, flat plains and unadorned farmhouse belonging to the victims form a visual contrast with Capote's frantic life in New York. A naive teenager's discovery of the murders, the savagery of the murders, and effects of the murders on the townspeople continue the contrasts between the harsh realities of local life and the esoteric lifestyle of Capote. When Perry Smith (sensitively played by Clifton Collins, Jr.) and Richard Eugene Hickock (Mark Pellegrino) are arrested, and Capote makes contact with Smith, the viewer suddenly sees Capote and Smith as similar--both lonely, sad, a bit shy, and sometimes frightened. As Perry Smith begins to confide in Capote, the similarities of their backgrounds and dysfunctional families become even more obvious.

Exceptionally opportunistic, Capote is also deeply affected by Smith, feeding him when his hunger strike leaves him close to death, but also borrowing Smith's personal journals for his research because "I don't want the world to see you as a monster." Sometimes abandoning Smith and Hickock for months at a time, Capote comes and goes in their lives, leaving Smith desperate at times, and causing Jack Dunphy, Capote's lover, to accuse Capote of using Smith. As the six years pass between the crime and the publication of In Cold Blood, Capote himself deteriorates from alcohol and drugs as inexorably as Smith and Hickock have done while awaiting execution.

The interactions between Hoffman, as Capote, and Collins, as Smith, lead to poignant scenes of great emotion--Capote dissembling when Smith wants to know the name of the book he is writing, Capote refusing to pay a visit to Smith until just before his execution, and Capote crying "I did everything I could," when clearly he did not. Intensely acted, sensitively directly, stunningly photographed, and hauntingly human, this memorable film takes a close, personal look at Capote and the man he fears may be his alter ego. Mary Whipple
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Breathtaking, 3 Aug. 2006
By 
William S. Cockrell "pig126849" (Lincs, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Capote [DVD] (DVD)
To really appreciate this film you really need to have read the book 'in cold blood' first. Without the experience of reading the final product of capote's exertions you cannot fully appreciate his manipulation of the central characters or his incredible gift for writing. What the film does is provide perspective for the book and demonstrate the emotional toll of writing it.

The casting is absolutely brilliant and it's beautifully shot. Without the context of the book it could be seen as quite slow or boring, when infact it is a thoroghly enlightening experience.

One of the best films i'v seen this year!
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