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4.5 out of 5 stars
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 25 March 2012
Everybody should see this inspirational film. As some people have pointed out it is only available as a Region 1 USA DVD. This is no problem. Nearly every DVD player can easily converted to play Region 1 Titles simply by tapping in a code number with the remote control. Try "dvd.reviewer.co.uk" for how to do it. If you have a Panasonic, Sony or Pioneer you will need a Special Remote Contral to unlock it - available from UK outfit "GenuineCopies.TV" at only a tenner. Amazon UK are doing the DVD at a very good price, so do it now !
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on 7 January 2012
I have never reviewed any product on amazon before, but I watched this film last night, and felt I had to. A fantastic portrayal of a truly fascinating and inspirational person - I will be recommending it to all of my friends and family. Clare Danes is fantastic, and from what I have seen of Temple Grandin in interviews - no one could of played the part better.
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It was appropriate that I should watch this film just after `World Autism Awareness Day' on April 2nd. This film brilliantly brings attention to a condition that was not even identified until 1943. It is a condition that has brought pain to so many families over the years. Most neurotypical people, which is everyone outside of the autistic spectrum have little understanding of the difficulties that sufferers and their families face. This film does much to bring attention to their plight. The film follows the life of Temple Grandin from a small child to her adult years. Diagnosed as autistic at four years old, we watch her struggle through her school years where she is bullied for being so different. Despite many setbacks Temple is able to triumph academically and goes on to even greater achievements with the help of a supportive mother. But each triumph comes at a cost and progress is never easy.

How refreshing it was to see such a well researched film. The intelligent way in which it incorporates the symptoms of autism into the film was particularly impressive. In one lovely scene Temple is watching the famous steamy love sequence in the film "From Here to Eternity" on her TV, but having no conception of love or relationships she promptly switches over to watch a documentary showing lions feeding on their prey. Much more interesting if you are autistic! A recurring theme is also the difficulty that Temple has in receiving something as simple as a cuddle. Her sensitivity to noise is also highlighted, which is common amongst autistic people. To illustrate the way Temple interprets everything in a literal way, we are given a number of flash images throughout the film. If you told her it was `raining cats and dogs' then that is what she would see. Perhaps most interesting was the way in which she see things in Leonardo like black lines of efficiency. DaVinci was another famous person suspected of being on the autistic spectrum!

The acting in the film is absolutely superb, with Claire Danes giving a performance worthy of Oscar recognition. She had clearly done her homework! She is ably supported by that great actor David Strathairn, who was quite brilliant in Indie director John Sayles film "Limbo". Julia Ormond is an impossibly attractive Mother, who acts as well as she looks. British director Mick Jackson has handled his material with both intelligence and sensitivity.The only other film I have seen on autism was "Rain Man", but this film is far better in the savvy knowledge it demonstrates of its subject matter. There are some genuinely moving and uplifting scenes in the film, none more so than when Temple sings "You'll Never Walk Alone" at her graduation. Possibly the best rendition ever!

This is a very fine achievement that broaches an awkward subject without resorting to the usual cloying sentimentality. It is a thought provoking film that also manages to educate the viewer, which is always an added bonus. The film has much to say about a condition that we still know so little about. Even today we do not understand what causes autism. Like the book "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" by Mark Haddon, it brings a worthy subject to public attention. Hopefully the film will not perpetuate the myth that all autistic people are highly intelligent, because that is not true. Whilst many are, there are others who struggle with varying degrees of learning difficulties. The spectrum is wide! This is an important film and worthy of five stars. A film that will no doubt be used as part of autistic awareness training in the future. A comfortable five stars. Such a pity that at the time of this review the film is only available on region 2 in rather expensive foreign imports. It deserves better!
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on 25 April 2011
Just got around to watching Temple Grandin, having recorded it a couple of weeks ago when it aired, and as soon as the credits rolled I came looking for a DVD of it. No R2 DVD as yet so instead I'm moved to write my first ever Amazon review.

I've always been a fan of Claire Danes, which is why I recorded it, but wasn't at all sure what to expect as this wouldn't usually be the type of subject matter I'd seek out. I certainly don't think I expected to be so utterly engrossed in what is a superb, funny, charming, moving and inspiring story. Danes excelled herself and I'm pleased she was justly rewarded with a Golden Globe.

If I had to criticise, I might say that the film glossed over the tougher moments of Temple's life and that I'm sure some obstacles were harder to overcome than was portrayed. But this film is about the triumph of Temple and not the trials of autism so the generally upbeat tone fits.

They'd better get that R2 version out before Christmas, I want to buy it for my Mum.
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on 10 February 2013
Dr Temple Grandin is just an outstanding lady. Her struggle through life with being non-verbal up to the age of 4 years old due to her Autism Spectrum Disorder condition. The unconditional love and input from Temple's mother to help her attain speech and strive to succeed in life through school and college, always with the idea that Temple would never be considered "Less" by anyone she came in contact with. This movie has really inspired me to help my own son who is 5 years old and who was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at 3 years old to excel and to now strive to achieve more in life than I thought could have been possible for him. I would recommend any parent or caregiver whose child has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder to show them that someone with this condition can achieve so much in life and also for those who have no understanding of this condition to watch this movie and try to understand what life is like for individuals who have this condition, to see the world the way a person with Autism sees it. In a different way, but never "Less".
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on 11 December 2011
Our entire family really enjoyed this fantastic film. Being a true story you get a real life look at what Temple had to deal with and how she grew up. You can also learn a great deal about Autisium and what it is like to have it. Plus you can see how it was dealt with when not many knew about it. A phenomninal,family ,heart warming film which may bring a tear to your eye.
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on 2 November 2014
From the director of The Bodyguard comes an HBO biopic about the famous autist and meat industry pioneer of the same name. Born in a time where autism was grossly misunderstood and treatments shoddy, Grandin overcomes much adversity, both social and medical, to not only make it through the education system and graduate, but also help implement much more humane methods of slaughter for cattle in the US that draw on her means of comfort and self control.

Simply put, 'Grandin' may be among the best biopics I have ever seen, and certainly one of HBO's finest in a long line of TV movies. Right off the bat, Danes give a career best performance, completely vanishing into the title role, not only through some subtle prosthetics but also carefully adopting the mannerisms of real people with the disorder. Speaking as someone who has a history tied to the disorder and its effects, she was absolutely spot on. Yet, in spite of the character's very matter of fact ways, she still imbues Temple with both a strong drive and passion for her work, as well as a strange optimism. Supporting her are the rock solid likes of Julia Ormond as her hard working though understandably stressed mother, Catherine O'Hara as her sweet, and ultimately influential, aunt, and David Straitham as her high school science teacher, who recognises and helps Temple develop her talents.

Beyond them though, Mick Jackson imbues the film with plenty of stylish flourish, mainly in the surreal representation of Temple's super-literal thoughts, which lead to some of the film's biggest yet also sincerest laughs (like when someone talks to Temple about 'animal husbandry', and her mind pictures it literally). Plus, the mainly South Western setting also gives the film an often goldish, very warm hue, which plays off nicely against the sometimes somber, even harsh, nature of the material, complimented by excellent sound work that greatly emphasise how Temple struggles to cope with even mundane everyday tasks like walking through automatic doors, which feel more like a guillotine to her..

Honestly, there isn't really much negative that I think of, especially given how tight this script is and how it can balance drama and sometimes oddball humour. There maybe one or two points that kinda slowed, but that was never an issue for me really as the film would always pick right back immediately, and for some, the 'literal thoughts' may come off a little too silly, but again, it's actually fairly accurate to how such a mind works so you can't accuse it of being off base. Frankly, I can't recommend this one enough, especially if you've ever had any kind of history or know people who suffer from autism/mental impairments, you'll instantly click with this movie.
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on 2 September 2012
You don't need to have any connections with Autism to appreciate this amazing story. If Autism has impacted on your life, then it is a must. It shows what can be achieved, with the will to succeed..... and helps people to understand some of the aspects of living with autism.
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on 13 April 2016
From the start of this film I was mesmerised by Claire Danes' portrayal of Temple Grandin. I was also impressed by the care that had gone into the production. Temple's visual thinking is illustrated in an extraordinary way. One slight criticism is the slightly goofy way people behave around her towards the end of the film. It's like the film makers are saying 'how lovely we Americans are when we finally get it'. I shed a few tears over this movie and it's not often that happens. If you want to get the background to this story read 'Neurotribes' by Steve Silberman.
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If you have Asperger's Syndrome in your family, or among your friends, -and even if you have not - see this amazing account of Temple Grandin's way of coping with being clever, and different. All Aspies are not completely like her, but the understanding you get from watching the film will help you understand whenever you are lucky enough to meet up with them.
Bodil Marie -
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