Customer Reviews


82 Reviews
5 star:
 (62)
4 star:
 (13)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly wonderful film from 2 of the greatest actors of all-time
Screen legends Morgan Freeman and the late Jessica Tandy light up the screen in my favourite on screen pairing of all-time.

This is a wonderful story of an elderly lady named Miss Daisy (Jessica Tandy) and her chauffeur (Morgan Freeman), who's been hired by her son (Dan Aykroyd) to assist his mother in getting her around after she has a driving accident...
Published on 19 Jun 2008 by Dazman

versus
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No subtitles for hard of hearing.
I had seen this film before buying from Amazon, unfortunately it was hard for me to follow as there were no subtitles for hard of hearing. Not all films listed on Amazon give information re; subtitles for deaf, so one must purchase before one knows!. Come on Amazon! for gods sake get your suppliers to insist on labelling subtitles or not!.

I watched the film...
Published on 25 Dec 2011 by Lizlass


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly wonderful film from 2 of the greatest actors of all-time, 19 Jun 2008
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
Screen legends Morgan Freeman and the late Jessica Tandy light up the screen in my favourite on screen pairing of all-time.

This is a wonderful story of an elderly lady named Miss Daisy (Jessica Tandy) and her chauffeur (Morgan Freeman), who's been hired by her son (Dan Aykroyd) to assist his mother in getting her around after she has a driving accident.

At first Miss Daisy resents the presence of her new chauffeur, but slowly but surely she learns to tolerate him, which in turn turns into mutual respect and into a great friendship.

Both Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman play their parts to perfection and their chemistry is unlike I've ever witnessed on screen, Jessica Tandy won an Oscar for her performance, along with the film itself.

This is a very gentle film, with lots of gentle humour, you could say that not alot goes on, but the film is all about the 2 legends of acting and their brilliant performances, it's a beautiful film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I just love the smell of a new car, don't you Miss Daisy?", 20 Jan 2004
By 
Jennifer Litchfield (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
Driving Miss Daisy is a classic example of why a movie doesn't need a shoot 'em up action sequence, or the usual obligatory sex scene, in order to enthrall and captivate. Despite the fact that the story covers a 25-year period in just over an hour and a half, it isn't a movie that rushes the viewer. Instead it proceeds at the comfortable pace of the southern-USA drawl characteristic of its Georgia setting. Unfortunately for those who are unused to this particular accent, at times it is difficult to make out what is being said. The unhurried feeling created is complemented by an excellent musical score - simple, light and almost whimsical, with a very catchy refrain.

The film follows the relationship (it would be too simplistic merely to call it friendship) between a widowed Jewish lady, Daisy Werthan, and her black chauffeur Hoke. Miss Daisy is adamant she neither wants nor needs the driver, provided by her exasperated son to ensure she doesn't have any more car accidents. However, over the next quarter century her frostiness thaws (albeit sporadically) and an understanding develops between this unlikely pair.

Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman well deserve the accolades they have received for their roles in this film. These talented actors have to share the limelight though - with a truly magnificent classic car ensemble. If you think modern cars are boring, it is worth viewing this film merely for the pleasure of seeing Miss Daisy's succession of cars - beautiful classic models from the late 1940s to the early 1970s - a time when cars truly deserved the title 'automobile'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Driving Miss Daisy, 12 April 2009
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
Wonderful, wonderful film - just about my favourite. The growing friendship and respect between these two is inspiring - the last image heart stopping. I watch it over and over again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Soft, subtle and lovely, 28 Jan 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
One of my favourite films.
Understated and clever performances from all the leads.
The beautiful friendship that builds over the years and a hint of the civil unrest and racist issues of the time threaded through the film.
It is a gentle film of growing old and unusual friendships with superb music underlining it all.

Wonderful
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good old-fashioned tale, 30 Sep 2003
By A Customer
This is a must for film lovers who appreciate a beautifully crafted story with strong characters instead of action and special effects. Featuring a cast of excellent actors including Morgan Freeman and Jessica Tandy it tells the story of a middle class Jewish woman and her working class black driver/help and the friendship that blossoms from unlikely roots. Also a good example of race relations in the US at that time. A touching classic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating story skillfully presented, 28 Dec 2004
By 
Dennis Littrell (SoCal/NorCal/Maui) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Take an intense and flawless performance by Jessica Tandy (80-years-old when the movie was released in 1989) and a charming and slyly witty performance by Morgan Freeman (closing in on his fifties)--she a rich Jewish lady of the South, high-toned, spoiled, stubborn to a fault, he a black illiterate chauffeur, wise, patient and in need of a job--and we have the basis for a profound character study. What we are studying is both the character of the leads and the character of a way of life passing languidly before our eyes.
Adapted for the screen from his Pulitzer Prize winning stage play by Alfred Uhry and directed by Bruce Beresford, who previously gave us the remarkable Aussie classic, Breaker Morant (1980), Driving Miss Daisy is one of those films that is a work of art as well as a sociological discovery. Using beautifully constructed scenes carefully observed, Beresford allows us to recall a way of life and a culture that characterized the South during the middle of the last century. Freeman's Hoke Colburn is black; and, as he mumbles, "not all that much has changed" since the days of slavery. He still has to "yes'em" and shuffle his feet and show deference to white folk just to get by. Miss Daisy Werthan herself is rich and very tight with her money. She is also as racially prejudiced as a Dixie sheriff, but blind to her prejudices as she rages against the infirmaries of age.
The movie begins as she loses control of her car and drives it off the road and into a drainage ditch. She is shaken but unharmed. However her driving days are over. Her son Boolie Werthan, played with a fine touch and surprising restraint by comedian Dan Aykroyd, decides to get her a chauffeur. But she will not hear of it. She feels her independence is being threatened, and she doesn't need her son to tell her what to do. She can take care of herself. When Boolie arrives with Hoke, who is clearly black, Miss Daisy declares she will not have that man in her house.
One feels very strongly at this point how compromised the infirm are when they must rely on help from others. Let a stranger into your house and there is no telling where it might end. More that this though, is the underlying idea that dependence on people from a lower social-economic class will in fact have a leveling effect on class distinctions, and this is again something that Miss Daisy (in her ignorance of herself) will not abide.
But Hoke says he has wrestled some hogs in the mud in his time and has yet to let one get away, and he will do what is necessary to secure his position as Miss Daisy's driver. He comes highly recommended, and after listening to him, Boolie has little doubt he got the right man for the job. Miss Daisy of course is having none of it, and indeed she tells him to get out. She refuses to get into the car; she won't let him clean the chandelier or weed her garden. However, he doesn't give up. He takes all of her contrariness with good spirit and a sunny attitude, and then one day as she tries to go shopping on foot, he follows alongside of her in the car, and after some walking she is persuaded to hop in.
On one level this is about racial politics in the South, circa mid- twentieth century, and on another level it is about growing old and coping with life as one grows old. It is about taking care of oneself and getting the most out of life despite the handicap of a declining body. This applies to both Hoke and Miss Daisy. He knows that the physical demands of a chauffeur are more appropriate to his age than some of the physical work he did when younger, and she knows that to live the full social life that she desires, she needs help in getting around. Naturally, as the film progresses they learn from one another. At first they are drawn together by her sharp wit and his appreciation of somebody who can speak the truth with a barb and not mince words. Later they are drawn closer together by their mutual strength of character and the plain fact that she needs a driver and he needs a job. But finally they are drawn together because they become, as she suddenly observes one day, best friends.
This then is a story of love as well--love between two people from different walks of life. The differences are not just those of race and socio-economic status, or of religion and gender, but of world views and personal psychology, hers demanding and exacting, highbrow and imperial, his practical and easy-going, naturistic and democratic.
A tide is turned when her temple is burned to the ground by "the same ones as always" as Hoke informs her, which forces Daisy to realize that her enemies are the same as his. Consequently she attends a speech given by Martin Luther King, Jr. He prefers to wait outside in the car and listen to it on the radio. At once we see the commonality of their understanding, but still the differences of their stations in life remain. The dream and the reality are meshing but slowly, as all things do in the Old South, or, for that matter, most anywhere.
See this above all for the captivating performances by Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman, two of the great actors of our time, and for the touching and bittersweet story by Alfred Uhry. Also noteworthy is director Beresford's careful attention to detail and his unobtrusive guidance so that the film flows as sweetly as Tupelo honey on a warm southern day.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Driving Miss Daisy - I love the smell of a new car, 29 May 2002
By A Customer
Driving Miss Daisy is a classic example of why a movie doesn't need a shoot 'em up action sequence, or the usual obligatory sex scene, in order to enthrall and captivate the viewer. Take time out and watch it on a lazy Saturday afternoon, because despite the fact that the story covers a 25-year period in just over an hour and a half, it isn't a movie in a hurry. Instead it proceeds at the comfortable pace of the southern-USA drawl characteristic of its Georgia setting. Unfortunately for those who are unused to this particular accent, at times it is difficult to make out what is being said.
The film follows the relationship (it would be too simplistic merely to call it friendship) between a widowed Jewish lady, Daisy Werthan, and her black chauffeur Hoke. Miss Daisy is adamant she neither wants nor needs the driver, provided by her exasperated son to ensure she doesn't have any more car accidents. However, over the next quarter century her frostiness thaws (albeit sporadically) and a camaraderie develops between this unlikely pair.
Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman well deserve the accolades they have received for their roles in this film. These talented actors have to share the limelight though - with a truly magnificent classic car ensemble. If you think modern cars are boring, it is worth viewing this film merely for the pleasure of seeing Miss Daisy's succession of cars - beautiful classic models from the late 1940s to the early 1970s - a time when cars truly deserved the title 'automobile'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Educational and entertaining, 15 Mar 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
The film obviously deals primarily with the issue of racial bigotry - specifically in the southern United States. It gives you a great feel for the way things were in that part of the world, from the 40's through to the present day. It is a 'must see' for any thoughtful person. I found it understated, warm and funny. It is a special edition of the DVD and as such has some really interesting extra footage: about the making of the film; about Jessica Tandy (she turned 80 during the filming, which is astonishing) and an interview with the Australian director. The film perhaps lacks the 'wow' factor, but in the same way that you wouldn't go to Paris without visiting the Eiffel Tower, you wouldn't want to die without having seen this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No subtitles for hard of hearing., 25 Dec 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
I had seen this film before buying from Amazon, unfortunately it was hard for me to follow as there were no subtitles for hard of hearing. Not all films listed on Amazon give information re; subtitles for deaf, so one must purchase before one knows!. Come on Amazon! for gods sake get your suppliers to insist on labelling subtitles or not!.

I watched the film with a young person with good hearing, they remarked on the sound quality of the DVD, so perhaps I was struggling against that also.
Having already seen the film I knew 'Driving Miss Daisy' is a lovely story/film, so please do not be put off by my experience, which was due to this particular DVD and nothing to do with the movie itself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lovely film, 23 Jun 2009
This review is from: Driving Miss Daisy [DVD] (DVD)
This is a great film portraying the long held opinions of the south so well. Would recommend it as an easy view.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Driving Miss Daisy [Blu-ray] [1989] [US Import]
Driving Miss Daisy [Blu-ray] [1989] [US Import] by Morgan Freeman (Blu-ray - 2013)
13.65
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews