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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an interesting take on the tudor era
I have never read any other books about Margaret. ususally tudor period books stick with the main English cast of Henry VIII, Henry VII and their wives. ive even read a few books about Mary (Henry VIII's sister). I must admit it was nice and refreshing to have new characters to read about!

the book is taken from the perspective of Margaret and her marriage to...
Published on 11 Mar. 2013 by clotty

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting story about a lesser known Tudor
3.5 stars

The story of Margaret, older sister of Henry VIII is possibly a less familiar one than that of his younger sister, Mary, and it's that fact which initially attracted me to this book. In fact, I think I've only read one other book about her - Jean Plaidy's "The Thistle and the Rose", which I read probably more than thirty years ago.

So I was...
Published on 29 Jan. 2013 by Caz


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an interesting take on the tudor era, 11 Mar. 2013
By 
This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Kindle Edition)
I have never read any other books about Margaret. ususally tudor period books stick with the main English cast of Henry VIII, Henry VII and their wives. ive even read a few books about Mary (Henry VIII's sister). I must admit it was nice and refreshing to have new characters to read about!

the book is taken from the perspective of Margaret and her marriage to the King of Scotland and her life there. she does a lot of growing up in the book, and makes a few mistakes, one being her second husband!! but i guess if you were her then you might make them too! sometimes i found her to be a little selfish and binkered but then again she was raised a princess and we cant fault her for being spoiled.

i did enjoy the book and i found the story ingrossing and beliveable. the characters were believeable, albeit one sided! but i did really enjoy it. i feel the author doesnt have the charisma of other authors just yet and i found the flow of the book a little hard sometimes. dates on the chapters would be nice, as at one point i got lost! but i feel that with a few more books this author could really give the big boys such as Alison Weir and Phillipa Greggory a go!

would highly recommend.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting story about a lesser known Tudor, 29 Jan. 2013
By 
Caz "So many books, so little time..." (Frinton-on-Sea) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Paperback)
3.5 stars

The story of Margaret, older sister of Henry VIII is possibly a less familiar one than that of his younger sister, Mary, and it's that fact which initially attracted me to this book. In fact, I think I've only read one other book about her - Jean Plaidy's "The Thistle and the Rose", which I read probably more than thirty years ago.

So I was interested in reacquainting myself with her story.

Margaret led a turbulent life that was frequently beset by tragedy. Like many females born into prominent families, she was used as a bargaining tool, a means of cementing alliances, to which end she was married to King James IV of Scotland at the age of 13.

As a young girl, Margaret is shown to be intelligent and lively. The early part of her life is dealt with very quickly, but before she leaves for Scotland, her father, Henry VII tells her that he has a dream that through her, the kingdoms of England and Scotland will be united, which of course does come to pass, although not in the way he had expected. (Margaret's great-grandson, James VI became James I of the United Kingdom in 1603 upon the death of Elizabeth I).

Margaret's husband is twenty-years her senior, handsome and kind; and she falls for him immediately. They were married for eleven years, (during which time and she bore him six children, only one of whom survived infancy), but those years are almost completely glossed over in the book and we do not really get to see or learn much of James at all, other than that his religious fervour is a frequent cause of discord between him and Margaret, and that he is not a faithful husband. Seeing their relationship from only one side serves only to distance James from the reader and I thought made Margaret frequently seem petulant and childish.

Margaret does grow throughout the story, but finds it difficult to work out where her loyalties lie; and her desire - incompatible with her position - to be loved for herself and not for her status as queen, leads her to make some unwise decisions when it comes to her personal life. She is often selfish and extravagant, and seems to have an enormous capacity for self-deception; but she is utterly determined to do the best for her son and to secure his throne.

In terms of the writing, the book is an easy read - although I did find the author's insistence at using "canna" (cannot) and "dinna" (did not) to somehow denote a Scottish accent incredibly annoying. There was an overuse of exclamation marks in the first part of the book which was similarly irritating. There was also a tendency for the author to suddenly jump forward a couple of years without any indication of which year it was, which I felt made for confusion.

There seems to be a trend in Historical Fiction at the moment to write using a first person narrative, and that is the case here. I've said in previous reviews that this is not my favourite style of narration and I have yet to read a book to make me change my mind. I can understand that it is perhaps thought to bring a greater degree of intimacy and immediacy to the reader, but in my opinion, that advantage is not nearly enough to compensate for the things that are lost by confining the story to a single point of view. This period in history is full of conflicts between nations, power-struggles between factions and within families - the courts of Europe were awash with intrigue and political machinations which are often as mind-boggling as they are fascinating - so unless the writer is going to continually slip into "as you know, Bob" dialogue, (which does happen here) first person narration can severely limit the scope of the story.

Margaret's story is a fascinating one and one that certainly merits further exploration. This book might serve as an introduction to her life, but it didn't draw me in and make me feel `connected' to the story. I will say, however, that if you are interested in Margaret's life, and don't find first person narration as objectionable as I do, then you might find The Forgotten Queen to your taste.

With thanks to Kensington Books and NetGalley for the review copy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable historical fiction.., 17 Mar. 2013
By 
jaffareadstoo (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Paperback)
This fictionalised account of the life of Margaret Tudor starts with the realisation that she is to be used a political pawn to unite the countries of England and Scotland. Dispatched to Scotland as a young teenager, Margaret makes the best of her marriage to King James IV, and despite his infidelities and weak nature, she falls for his inherent charm. When she is widowed after the Battle of Flodden, Margaret must learn how to survive in a man's world, and even as she seeks to protect her baby son, now James V, there are powerful men who would seek to destroy her. Margaret's fearsome determination and self-absorption, do not make her very endearing, and I suspect that of all the Tudor siblings, Margaret was perhaps more like her brother, King Henry VIII, whose capricious and volatile nature is well documented. There is no doubt that Margaret was neither very good at marriage or motherhood, and the unpredictability of her troubled life makes for fascinating reading.

Overall, I thought the story was well written, the skill of the author encourages an emotional investment in the characters and even as Margaret comes across as both narcissistic and vainglorious, there is an element of sympathy for a woman who seemed to be strangely out of step with the world around her. The historical feel of the era is well captured, and it was refreshing to read about one of the lesser documented Tudor princesses.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars HISTORICALLY INACCURATE, 20 July 2013
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This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Paperback)
I bought this as I know very little about Margaret Tudor other than she married James IV. When I started reading it seemed innocuous enough - it was the child Margaret writing and it was written in a childish voice. However I did not get very far into the novel before the inaccuracies and errors jumped off the page at me. Now I'm not a professor of Medieval Scottish History but as a patriotic Scot I know a lot about my country's history particularly the Stewart Kings.

The marriage between James and Margaret was a dynastic one - it may have been Henry Tudor's intention to bring the countries together or to try to add Scotland to his Kingdom as Edward Longshanks mistakenly tried. It is unlikely that James would have spoken to Margaret in the way he did or fall in love with her - her purpose was solely to produce sons. He loved Margaret Drummond and was devastated by her death or murder whichever way you want to look at it. Princesses and women of noble families were by and large commodities and used to benefits their fathers and male relatives (eg the Boleyn sisters.)

And now to the most glaring error I've ever read. James IV's father was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn. Now THAT was complete news to me - I read that paragraph twice to make sure my eyes weren't playing tricks with me. Let me put that straight Ms Bogdan in case you read this - I see you are a student of history and this might be a line of study you want to pursue. James III was killed at the Battle of SAUCHIEBURN in 1488. The battle of Bannockburn took place in 1314. The Stewart line - descended from the victor of Bannockburn (that would be Robert the Bruce) - had not yet been established. An easy mistake to make but not a good one to a Scot who knows her history.

Finally she refers to the Bishop of Moray as the Bishop of Murray. Never, ever has this area or name been other than Moray.

You may have gathered that I gave up on this novel and have asked for a refund on the grounds that it was too annoying and inaccurate to read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good but with some errors, 26 July 2013
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This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Paperback)
Being a big fan of the Stewarts, especially James IV, I was excited about there being a book about Margaret Tudor. Even although it is fictional that did not put me off and I sat down to read The Forgotten Queen with eagerness. I was addicted and was up for half the night reading, telling myself that after the next chapter I would go to sleep... about seven chapters later I finally went to sleep!

Not having known much about Margaret and her family beforehand I found their characters very interesting, Margaret could be a tad annoying at times but apart from that I liked her, and I did feel tears coming at times for her, like when she was leaving her father Henry VII to go to Scotland! I was not disappointed with the character of James IV; he was lovely and kind, albeit with a lot of issues going on making him very depressed throughout the book.

On to the negative. I hate being picky, and I do feel bad but this really really bugged me! James IV's father was murdered after the battle of Sauchieburn in 1488. However, the author writes (in the chapter where James was explaining to Margaret about his father's death) that James III was slaughtered at the battle of Bannockburn. This is not true!!!!! Bannockburn happened in 1314, which was 174 years before Sauchieburn even happened, meaning obviously that no one in the era of this book was even alive.

I would recommend the book just for a good read, not really for reference due to the 'Bannockburn' incident and the fact that it is fictional. It is very easy to get into, it is well written and the characters are easy to connect to.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The story of Henry VIII's sister Margaret Tudor, 9 Mar. 2013
This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Paperback)
The novel, The Forgotten Queen, accurately portrays the fascinating life of Margaret Tudor. The book covers almost her entire life in great detail, portraying her as likeable, but dreamy, courageous, yet prone to youthful naivety and gullibility.

The plot is intricate and easily followed. Margaret's love for her was strong, and although she made a definite judgement in error when picking her second husband, it only makes her plight understandable - for who among us hasn't made similar mistakes in our youth?

For those who love the Tudor era, and even for those who are tired of novels about Henry VIII's wives, this novel gives us a glimpse into the political climate between Scotland and England, and details of the adversities faced by a lesser known queen.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Forgotton Queen., 25 Jan. 2014
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This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Kindle Edition)
It was really refreshing to read a Tudor novel about another character other than Henry VIII and his colourful life. Margaret is seen in the background before and after she went to marry her Jamie in Scotland in most novels, but never as the main character. It breathed life into her story and sees her as a young princess in England yearning for her father's love, losing her mother at a young age and always being one step behind her beautiful sister, Princess Mary Rose. It shows her obsession with Jamie and her mistakes when as a young widow she marries in haste and loses her sons and the regency. It shows her bravery as she realises what she has done and how she fights back and regains her son and the regency of Scotland. A very good novel and very interesting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Just re-released wityh a new cover, a new title and a different author's name!, 24 April 2014
By 
Maggie Kelly (Moseley, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Kindle Edition)
See "Tudor Princess" by Darcey Bonnette.

What a rip off. Why republish the exact same book with everything that draws you in to buy it having been replaced?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Forgotton Queen, 13 Jun. 2013
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Excellent book about Margaret Tudor - Henry V111's sister - up there with Philippa Gregory. Excellent read for anyone interested in the Tudors
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good enjoyed it hugely, 30 April 2013
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This review is from: The Forgotten Queen (Kindle Edition)
Really did enjoy the forgotten queen it captured me and I fell in to the story which was very well written and told in a wonderful 1st term basis' I read many books on the Tudors and there amazing time in history and believe this to be a very good tail of mostly true events that happened, would read more from this author but there are no more books on kindle from D.L.Nissan such a shame please update me if there is.
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The Forgotten Queen by D.L. Bogdan
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