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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Bond book.
From Russia, With Love is stunning. Fleming writes in an unusually excellent prose for a thriller writer, combininng the threads of the complex plot to excellent and often harrowing effect.
The characterisation is the best feature of this tour de force. Every character is fully and artistically developed - Red Grant, the psychotic killer, is the ultimate Bond enemy...
Published on 31 Aug 2002 by George Owers

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3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
One of the better Bond novels, but unique in being inferior to the film of the same name.
Published 1 month ago by AGTrio


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Bond book., 31 Aug 2002
By 
George Owers - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
From Russia, With Love is stunning. Fleming writes in an unusually excellent prose for a thriller writer, combininng the threads of the complex plot to excellent and often harrowing effect.
The characterisation is the best feature of this tour de force. Every character is fully and artistically developed - Red Grant, the psychotic killer, is the ultimate Bond enemy and he still packs a punch fifty years on. Rosa Klebb is written vividly, in all her detestable glory. Romanovna is not the average Bond girl - she is well introduced, as well as being a most luscious Bond girl, and plenty of backround to her life is given, something often lacking in Fleming's other efforts. Bond himself is also developed marvellously, and quite aside from the cardboard cutout characters we often get in a Bond book, none of these characters are lacking in depth and dimension.
If the plot is good - SMERSH plotting to kill MI6's best agent and also to create a world wide sex scandal with far reaching implications for the credibility of British intelligence into the bargain - then the execution is better. Every page is a masterpiece in itself, and the whole plot moulds perfectly and seamlessly, from London, Istanbul, the Orient Express and France, with perfection.
Fleming, with FRWL, proves himself not only to be a top rate thriller writer, but a top rate story teller and descriptive writer as well.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars As entertaining today as 40 years ago, 29 April 2002
By A Customer
If, like me, you grew up watching the James Bond films, it is a fascinating experience reading the original books which gave rise to the blockbusters. And they do not dissappoint.
Each of the three stories in this book differ significantly from the film versions; so even though you find yourself visualising the scenes you recognise, you are still confronted by surprises and twists in the plot.
Another major difference is the depth of character that Fleming gives to Bond, the girls and the villians - one possible criticism of the films are they are a bit "cartoonish".
Finally, although the books are set in a by-gone age of Cold War espionage, they capture that time perfectly with a refreshing "Britishness" which readers of my generation are not used to.
I highly recommend you try them out.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fleming's Best Works, 17 July 2005
If you don't already own any Ian Fleming novels, this wonderful omnibus edition from Penguin Modern Classics is a fantastic starting point from which to dive into the James Bond literary ocean.
FROM RUSSIA, WITH LOVE is almost universally regarded as Fleming's masterpiece novel, and is the first novel in this collection. The plot is fairly similar to the 1963 film. The biggest difference is that the organisation that Bond is pitted against is SMERSH, rather than SPECTRE as it was in the film. SMERSH try to lure bond into a trap, the bait being a Spektor cipher machine. (It was called Lektor in the movie) Bond main ally is the memorable Darko Kerim. The girl is a Russian cipher clerk named Tatiana, and the villain is Rosa Klebb, a repulsive woman who is described brilliantly by Fleming. This is a great taut, suspenseful novel right down to the final twist on the last page.
DR NO is second in the collection and is another great read. This was the first Fleming novel I ever read, and it was a very nice, easy read. The plot is fairly simple, and the characters move fluidly within it. Honey Ryder is the Bond girl this time out, and Quarrel (from Live And Let Die) returns. Many of the scenes are the same as those in the movie, although the villain's death is very different (And quite bizarre!!) Bond is attacked by a deadly centipede and a giant squid and comes out the other end in one piece as only 007 can do!
GOLDFINGER is arguably one of the most famous titles in the world thanks to the 1964 film, and it rounds off this trio of novels. The highlight is undoubtedly the game of golf with Goldfinger. I actually enjoyed the first half of the novel more than the second half. The whole gangster scenario was a little difficult to follow, and the whole ending is not as good IMO as the film version. Nonetheless it is a great novel, and deserves a place in any collection, as do all of Ian Fleming's works, which tend to be underrated.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bond's Best, 25 Jan 2005
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The fifth Bond book is far and away the best I've read of the series. Much of its strength comes from an excellent beginning-almost a quarter of the book passes before Bond appears. The story starts in Moscow, where the Soviet intelligence community has decided it needs to pull off a major coup in order to maintain its prestige. The SMERSH division (for those who are new to the series, or for whom it's motto of "Death To Spies" isn't clear enough, SMERSH is in charge of eliminating internal and external spies) is tasked with killing that perpetual thorn in the side of international communism, James Bond. All the major villains are introduced in this early section, from the psychotic ace hit man (alas, his full-moon madness is an unnecessary and silly element), to the deviant older woman who runs the operation, to the chess mastermind who plans it, and finally, the beautiful and more or less innocent honey pot who will be set in front of Bond as bait. Two of these scenes are mini-masterpieces, the very first, where the naked hit man lies by his pool and gets his massage, and then later, when the planner is met in the middle of the Moscow city championship match.
Only after all the pieces are in place, does Fleming finally pull away the curtain to reveal the object of all this attention, 007. This is a brilliant technique for heightening interest in a character and building suspense (Hitchcock was the master of it), and it sets the stage beautifully. We find Bond more or less indolent, having recently broken up with Tiffany Case (his girl from Diamonds Are Forever), and growing surly with inaction. The Soviet plot lures him to Istanbul, where he is met by another vivid character, Darko Karim, who is head of British intelligence in Turkey. After minor adventures there-notable is a lurid gypsy catfight-they make contact with the female lure, and the trio steal away on the Orient Express. The rest of the story takes place on the train, as it makes the four day trip through Europe, across Greece, and through places like Llubljana, Belgrade, Trieste, Venice, and on to Paris. It's an extended cat and mouse game, as the reader waits for the Russians to spring their trap.
The one complaint I would have with this otherwise gripping book is that, as in many of the Bond series, the super spy is a bumbling idiot who manages to escape death only through the most unlikely actions of his foes. As in earlier and later books, he manages to miss rather obvious clues and lets others do the heavy lifting for him, only to walk into a rather simple trap. In this instance, Fleming makes an attempt to account for this by continually noting that Bond's senses are dulled from inactivity and that he's not sharp, and so forth. This grumble aside, its a very entertaining work,and definitely the best Bond I've read. Oh yes, Fleming does commit one gaffe with Bond's history that seems a little strange. At one point, it is mentioned that Bond has never killed in cold blood; which makes no sense, because it is explicitly stated in the very first book (Casino Royale) that he did! His shooting of a Japanese spy in New York, and knifing of a Dutch double-agent are what earned him his 00 ("Licensed to Kill") designation, so it's strange that here Fleming would suggest otherwise. In any event, if you only read one Bond book, make it this one.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ironic - critics finally get there, 28 May 2004
By 
Jl Adcock "John Adcock" (Ashtead UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Ian Fleming's novels were once dismissed as trash by several critics at the time of their original publication. How things have moved on. The whole Bond phenomenon remains hugely popular, and the novels are where it all began. Yes, these novels are modern classics, and it's only proper that they're treated as such. Fleming's prose is elegant, exciting, page-turning; all the things you expect in good writing. As one reviewer put it, there's never a wasted word - and that in itself is a real art. All the novels are worth reading - and in sequence you can track the development of Fleming's style, through to where he himself grew bored with his own creation. The three novels here are probably the peak of his output - From Russia With Love is perhaps the finest book in the series. If you have never read the original Bond novels, a treat awaits.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Where East meets West, 29 Sep 2001
This, the fifth James Bond novel, is probably Fleming's most straightforward 'cold war' tale, in what basically comes down to a straight fight between the British Secret Service, in the shape of our hero, James Bond, on one side, and the Soviet SMERSH organisation, in the shape of their assassin 'Red' Grant, on the other. These two ultimately battle it out in a microcosm of the
world political struggle of the 1950's. It also happens to be the one Fleming novel that was transferred to the big screen by Saltzman & Broccoli without too much artistic licence being used in the finished product.
Starting very slowly (Bond himself doesn't appear until page 78), the plot builds steadily amongst the slim minarets and domed mosques of Istanbul,
reaching its climax on the Orient Express as, in the words of Fleming, it 'thunders superbly over the 1400 miles of glittering steel track between
Istanbul and Paris'. In its comfortable compartments Bond is forced to fight for his life, and just as importantly his and the Secret Service's reputation.

The main characters own stories are revealed to us in great detail. There is the beautiful but naive MGB Corporal, Tatiana Romanova, a distant relation of the Russian Imperial family and the unwitting bait (along with the secret Spektor cipher machine) to lure Bond into a trap. There is Darko Kerim, the resourceful and likeable Anglo-Turkish Head of Station T, who believes that
his operation in Turkey should be a strictly family affair. There is Colonel Rosa Klebb, who as the Head of Otdyel II, the Operations and Executions branch of SMERSH, is 'one of the most powerful women in the (Soviet) State and certainly the most feared.' Finally there is 'Red' Grant, aka 'The Moon Killer', the Irish-born psychopath and murderer, and the top executioner of Otdyel II.
A fascinating glimpse into the secretive world of the different Soviet intelligence agencies of the 1950's is provided by Fleming. We see the
jockeying for position and the attempts to 'show up' rival organisations between RUMID (the intelligence department of the Soviet Foreign Ministry), the GRU (the intelligence department of the Soviet Army) and the MGB (the Soviet Secret Service). It is these three organisations, under the formidable and crafty eye of 'G', the Head of SMERSH, who light the fuse of the
delicious plot that burns slowly along the shores of the Bosphorus, until exploding in the carriages being pulled across Europe by the German locomotive that is, the Orient Express.
Not the best Bond novel, but it is not far off. Characters, plot and location, all combine to make a thoroughly believable and immensely readable novel. The ending is also very unusual, when compared to other Bond novels. I can imagine the phone lines to Jamaica were very busy in 1957, when this book first came out, with avid Bond readers demanding to know just what Fleming
was playing at. All would eventually be revealed at the start of the next Bond outing, 'Dr No', published later that year.
The only thing that confused me was the picture of the exploding Faberge egg on the cover of the Coronet Book. What it had to do with this Bond adventure escapes me !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Russia With Love: Ian Fleming - One of Fleming's best, 26 Nov 2013
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
From Russia With Love, first published in 1957, is the fifth of Ian Fleming's books to feature the superspy James Bond. And it is one of his best, right up there with Moonraker in the thrilling read stakes.

The book opens with a long detailed description of the history of Red Grant, a psychopath used by SMERSH as their top assassin. There then follows a long and tense section in which the inner workings of SMERSH and the Russian intelligence apparatus are explored as a committee meeting is held, the ultimate conclusion of which is a death warrant for a certain James Bond and the start of detailed plan to kill him and bring the British intelligence service into disrepute. It is only a quarter of the way through that we meet our hero, as he is sent out to Istanbul to deal with an offer from a Russian agent that looks very inviting form many respects. In Istanbul Bond meets one of Fleming's best characters, Darko Kerim. A larger than life Turk working for British Intelligence, he fills the role usually taken by Felix Leiter in earlier books, and provides Bond with staunch support and firm friendship. After a series of adventures in Turkey, Bond decides to take the Russian bait and a flight across Europe on the Orient Express is soon in motion, and builds to a final crashing conclusion as Bond finally meets with Red Grant, and the full depth of the Russian trap is revealed to him. There then follows an interesting post script to the adventure which ends on a thrilling cliffhanger that readers in 1957 had to wait until the publication of Dr No to see resolved.

It's a thrilling read from start to finish. Populated by well drawn characters of varying degrees of charm or monstrosity. I especially enjoyed the Bond-less opening quarter of the book in which the opposition is studied and the seeds of the plot sown. Fleming, as usual draws a series of grotesque figures to pit against Bond, but balances these with characters such as Kerim who are complex, morally dubious and firmly on Bond's side. Fleming also writes superb action scenes and sets scene with a prose style that drips with imagination and atmosphere. No other author I have ever read can describe a scene with the clarity and intensity of Fleming, and he uses that skill to his usual good effect here. The plot is one of his best, and the book well constructed so that even though the reader knows that there is a plot, the exact extent and nature of it is kept hidden up until it is revealed to Bond as well. It's a classic, thrilling read, 5 stars.
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4.0 out of 5 stars gripping,moving in unision with the pace of the orient expre, 6 Feb 2001
By A Customer
FRWL is a novel with a somewhat different plot. a plot where bond is the pawn in a nasty game masterminded by Rosa Klebb- head of the dreaded s.m.e.r.s.h.the story takes us to the east, europe and ends in paris. the pace is in unision with that of the orient express.somewhat slow but full of suspense. fleming keeps us glued to the book till the end ...even then we are kept at tenterhooks as we try to guess bond's destiny.is the s.m.e.r.s.h. successful in killing the smart & suave bond? only the next novel could answer this question. all in all a very interesting peice of work.as a student of english honours i am mighty glad that the board chose frwl as a part of the curriculum.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What a thriller!, 11 July 2001
By A Customer
This is one of Fleming's best, if not the best. If you've seen the equally superb film, then you will understand this quite easily. The first third of the book is about S.M.E.R.S.H's plan to rid Bond and destroy MI6's reputation. Bond's adventure in Istanbul with Tania and Kerim is fascinating, but when Bond and Tania board the Orient Express, the book becomes more suspensful. The talk between Red Grant and Bond is gripping, and (I won't spoil the end!) the last chapter leaves you frightened in some respects. It sends shivers down your spine when you picture the final scene in your head. Forget other British thrillers - this is as good as they get!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bond, James Bond, 20 Mar 2000
By A Customer
After only reading 6 Fleming Bond Novels, this is by far one of the best. Right from the start, Fleming introduces a menace of a character (Red Grant) who plays a major part in a clever trap created by SMERSH to put Bond to his death. There is some great character development in this novel, especially the relationship between Bond and his counterpart in Turkey, Kerim Bay. There are some believable ememies and great locations. The train journey on the Orient Express is the main highlight of this book. This is a must for all Bond fans, make sure you have Dr. No ready for when you've finished this one.
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