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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 2012 studio canal blu-ray
brilliant picture quality,the before and after restoration feature on this disc shows what a great job was done on this.there are english subtitles and a short documentary about the film plus a trailer so not much in the way of extras but the film itself looks as good as Kind Hearts and Coronets.full marks studio canal and lets hope they continue to release more of the...
Published on 23 Nov 2012 by gerrard

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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alec Guiness proves that progress is not good news for all
As so often in Ealing comedies, the common man against the system is the theme of this film. In this much, "The Man in the White Suit" echoes the the battle to save a village railway in "The Titfield Thunderbolt", and the ordinary Londoners' stand against arrogant officialdom in "Passport to Pimlico". Mild-mannered genius Alec Guinness...
Published on 8 Nov 2000


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5.0 out of 5 stars funny, 5 Mar 2013
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wonderful, my dad loves this, he watched it when he was younger, and brings back memories for him, hes nostalgic like that
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Guinness at his comic best, 16 Jun 2002
By A Customer
Alec Guinness displays all his comic genius in this Alexander Mackendrick saga of dirty dealings up at t' mill. The special effects of the mad scientist's machinery and sound effects are exceptionally good for their time.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ... DVD version and as it is one of my favourite movies I wanted the higher resolution Blu-ray version to ..., 7 Sep 2014
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I currently have the DVD version and as it is one of my favourite movies I wanted the higher resolution Blu-ray version to enjoy it further in a larger screen format.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Beleaguered Entrepreneur, 29 Oct 2012
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This 1951 Ealing film directed by Alexander MacKendrick was his second feature (following the equally outstanding Whisky Galore!) and is another brilliantly observant comedy, principally presenting a tale of good, honest fun, but also with some insightful, satirical intent. MacKendrick, who co-wrote the screenplay with Roger MacDougall (whose stage play was the basis for the film), creates a nicely authentic Northern industrial feel for his comic tale, with many sharp touches depicting the antagonism between exploitative bosses and the unionised labour force, together with atmospherically shot industrial landscapes and factory interiors, courtesy of regular Ealing cinematographer Douglas Slocombe.

Alec Guinness stars once again in an Ealing film (in a role which, along with that in The Lavender Hill Mob, is my favourite of his in this genre), this time as Cambridge chemistry guru and entrepreneur, Sidney Stratton, who finds himself 'working undercover' on an illicit, and secret, invention in the research lab of a Northern textile mill. Resigning from his post at one mill (having just avoided detection), Sidney re-emerges at competitor mill, Birnley's, where his boss, Alan Birnley (played with trademark authority by Cecil Parker) finally accepts that Sidney's invention of an everlasting, dirt-repellent fibre could spell the end of his competitor manufacturers. MacKendrick's film is full of delightful moments of comedy, as the mill bosses attempt to get to the bottom of Sidney's scheming, eventually suffering repeated explosions as Stratton's experiments go awry.

Guinness is outstanding as the geeky academic Stratton, whose mastery of polymerisation of amino acid residues and long chain molecules is at the expense of any notion of common sense. Also on the acting front, in addition to Parker, MacKendrick elicits great understated comedy performances from Michael Gough as rival mill owner Michael Corland, and from the likes of Colin Gordon, Roddy Hughes and Ewan Roberts in supporting roles. As Birnley's 'little rich girl' daughter Daphne, Joan Greenwood is at her sultry and husky best, as she is coerced by the mill bosses into seducing Sidney in an attempt to get him to sign away the rights to his invention. It has, of course, occurred to Birnley's fellow cloth manufacturers , led by Sir John Kierlaw (an impressively doddery Ernest Thesiger), as well as the mill trade unions (including Sidney's lone sympathiser Bertha, played with earthy bravado by Vida Hope) that Sidney's invention must be suppressed in order for the industry to survive. As Sidney attempts to evade his pursuers bedecked in a white suit made of his precious fibre, the closing sequences of the film are some of the best, as the budding entrepreneur abseils down the side of a building and is finally cornered by the massing vigilante group only to discover that his fibrous invention is not all that he had cracked it up to be, leaving the audience with the impression that the lone entrepreneur is (perhaps) fighting a losing battle against the combined might of the industrial cartel and trades union.

An extremely funny and poignant film, in keeping with the very best of Ealing.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 19 July 2009
It's hard to use words that have not been aired before. It's difficult to say that its anything other than a British classic out of Ealing Studios with the irrepressible Sir Alec.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gurgling Ingenuity, 26 Sep 2005
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I recently purchased The Horse's Mouth (1958) from Amazon as well as "The Alec Guinness Collection" which includes The Man in the White Suit (1951) plus four others: Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Captain's Paradise (1953), and The Ladykillers (1955). Frankly, I was amazed how well each of the six films has held up since I first saw it.
Directed by Alexander MacKendrick (who also directed The Ladykillers four years later), what we have in The Man in the White Suit is Guinness' own version of the naive, indeed eccentric visionary/inventor/humanitarian. Sidney Stratton's dream is to create a fabric which never wears out and cannot be soiled. Endless (sometimes explosive) experiments involving various gurgling contraptions prove unsuccessful. Meanwhile, Stratton is fired from his job in one research laboratory, continues his research in another, and eventually succeeds. Or so he thinks.
One of these film's several delights is Joan Greenwood's portrayal of Daphne Birnley, daughter of the owner of the company in whose laboratory Stratton finally discovers the correct formula for the miracle fabric. Her father is played with great style by Cecil Parker who is almost as eager to marry off his daughter as he is to save his company. Only a spoilsport would reveal the climax of this entertaining film, one which may surprise viewers as much as it does Stratton and Alan Birnley. Sadder but wiser, Stratton ambles (as only Guinness can) into an uncertain future. Nowhere else throughout the plot is the special soundtrack more effective than it is in this final scene.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Alec Guiness proves that progress is not good news for all, 8 Nov 2000
By A Customer
As so often in Ealing comedies, the common man against the system is the theme of this film. In this much, "The Man in the White Suit" echoes the the battle to save a village railway in "The Titfield Thunderbolt", and the ordinary Londoners' stand against arrogant officialdom in "Passport to Pimlico". Mild-mannered genius Alec Guinness invents an everlasting fabric, making himself unpopular with textile workers and bosses alike, but making him a big hit with Joan Greenwood. Throughout the film, he remains single-mindedly devoted to his miracle fabric, and somewhat oblivious to the amorous attentions of both Greenwood and one of his factory co-workers played by Vida Hope. The film includes some brilliant comic moments, particularly as a succession of unwitting employers discover just how much of their money Guinness has been syphoning off to pay for the development of his invention.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Canal Blu-ray not as good as Anchor Bay DVD in the states, 25 Oct 2013
By 
D. Ostrov (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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To my surprise, the Blu-ray does not look as good as the Anchor Bay DVD from the states. They have remarkably similar detail, but the DVD (to my surprise) his better in that is has fewer overly-bright scenes, no wavering of the brightness, fewer scratches -- really a better picture.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Trouble at the Mill, 18 Jan 2006
By 
L. Davidson (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
"The Man in the White Suit" is a whimsical and at times surreal tale about an unorthodox , yet persistent, scientist who invents a type of cloth which never wears out and never gets dirty. While this invention provides an apparent short term market advantage for his employer , it soon becomes clear that it's implications appear to be destructive to the future of the whole textile industry. Alec Guinness's heroic inventor soon becomes a hate figure for factory employers and employees alike, much to his bewilderment, and both sides of industry frantically endeavour to suppress the new technology he created . The main theme of the film is science ,and the liberating effect of new technology, versus entrenched interests fearful of the financial consequences to them of it's successful implementation. Thankfully much of the Luddist mentality this film portrays has disappeared from British society and if Alec Guinness's invention was to be made today, I suspect it would be welcomed with open arms by global trade and commerce. The film is well acted, Joan Greenwood plays the love interest (such as it is) with style, and there are some humourous moments to savour as the story unfolds..
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Amusing, Watchable, Great Premise, 4 July 2013
By 
This black and white 1951 Ealing comedy follows the antics of the shy inventor Alex Guinness as he pursues his love of textile science. His gentle but determined approach sees him get in trouble with his mill bosses as he pushes well beyond their acceptable boundaries of research. He's not going to give up his ideals and continues his research as in the guise of a lowly store man elsewhere.

On making a production break through that could benefit all outside the industry he faces opposition from both management and the workers as they focus on their self-interest.

The idea of the film is great and feels a little dangerous but is handled with a light touch. The introduction of his links with the opposing interested parties is especially well handled felling natural, not forced. The highlight of the film is seeing Guinness in the middle of the workers and management and how his position fluctuates with both from foe to enemy. That and the awesomely white suit.

Guinness plays his part well and it's interesting to see him play a quiet, if determined, man and throw in some subtle comedy moments. I liked the ending but it's a shame the romances element, that's a reasonable part of the film, is not resolved in any great way.

It's a good watchable film I'd recommend it but doesn't get to the heights of other Ealing comedies with great ideas like Passport to Pimlico or The Lady Killers. Maybe it will grow on me with repeated viewing; I'd not be opposed to seeing it again.
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The Man In The White Suit [DVD] [1951]
The Man In The White Suit [DVD] [1951] by Alexander Mackendrick (DVD - 2012)
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