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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There's nothing fishy about this Aquaman
This series is among the most highly praised of DC's New 52 revamps and you aren't going to get any argument about that from me.

We meet an Aquaman in his prime and there are a number of mysteries about his previous life of which only some are revealed or hinted at. He's married to Mera, a mature no-nonsense woman who has less tolerance for fools than her...
Published on 26 Sept. 2012 by Ian Williams

versus
0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars He is the worst super hero in the world
He is the worst super hero in the world. My friend made my hand become a trident just to he could become aqua man. "Oh no it's aqua-man. Quick, get to the land!"
Published 3 months ago by Danny Callaghan


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There's nothing fishy about this Aquaman, 26 Sept. 2012
By 
Ian Williams "ianw" (Sunderland, UK) - See all my reviews
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This series is among the most highly praised of DC's New 52 revamps and you aren't going to get any argument about that from me.

We meet an Aquaman in his prime and there are a number of mysteries about his previous life of which only some are revealed or hinted at. He's married to Mera, a mature no-nonsense woman who has less tolerance for fools than her husband, and they live in a lighthouse. Aquaman is a bit of a joke to people who very much underrate him except for those who see him (and Mera) go up against a race of hominid fish with the appetite of piranhas who attack a nearby coastal village.

The writer/artist team of Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis -two of the top people in their fields working in mainstream comics today- hit the mark every time. But don't take my word for it. Buy this book now and find out for yourself. I doubt very much if you'll regret it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The atlantic avenger surfaces, 14 Oct. 2012
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Geoff Johns has revived his fair few of dcs characters, from Green Lantern Rebirth, Justice Society of America: The Next Age v. 1 (Jsa), Rebirth (Flash (DC Comics)) and even Superboy: The Boy of Steel, his latest writing chalenge is the king of the ocean himself, aquaman and he once again, knocks it out of the park, sea, whatever.

Not only does Johns revel in all the jokes that's been said about the atlantic avenger but by the time you finish reading this book you can see why johns is so good at what he does. Paired with his Blackest Night art partner, Ivan Reis, the trench is an almost horror story in the sea like how Jaws (Blu-ray + Digital Copy + UV Copy) [1975] used to be before it got silly, the enemy aquaman faces are vicious hybrid pirahnas and how Arthur struggles with a life on land with his atlantic wife. A very good introduction to one of dcs new 52 books.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "There are no bad characters, only badly written characters", 4 July 2013
By 
Pink Fluffy Bunny (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This is the first of the `New 52' books - I read the collected editions in my local libraries - which I have read all the way through without a single (mental) complaint; no "I wouldn't have done it that way" or "why did they do that". This is the best Aquaman I have read since the days of Dick Giordano (editor), Steve Skeates (writer) and Jim Aparro (artist). There have been good stories and sequences since then, but this is simply excellent, and I mean `simply', due to the nature of the `reboot'. There is much implied back-story, but little explicitly declared, other than Aquaman is King of Atlantis, or ex-King - the exact status is uncertain - but he doesn't want to have anything to do with the Atlanteans, and they only want him when there's trouble. The relationship with Mera might be long-standing, or it might be fairly recent - no mention of Aquababies, Aqualads or Aquagirls - but she has a mysterious secret origin which is hinted at as we go along. They both live in a lighthouse on the coast somewhere near Boston, though with rural communities along the coast. It is also made clear that everyone thinks Aquaman is a joke, despite his abilities and the help he gives communities and police forces, which in itself gives us much entertainment value. Oh, there is an Aquadog though.

The first storyline, which runs through issues #1-6, consists of a four-parter - "The Trench", and two single stories, "Lost" and "Deserted", continuing directly on from the Trench, complete in themselves, but developing the plot and setting up the next storyline, "The Others".

"The Trench" establishes the current status of Aquaman and Mera and the world they inhabit. It is a fairly straightforward story, presenting us with a threat which rises from the bottom of the abyssal plain - the trench of the title - and attacks a coastal town, killing and kidnapping the inhabitants. The creatures are an intelligent species of some sort, which have come to the surface looking for food, and find plenty of us. Despite the best efforts of the authorities to hinder them, Aquaman and Mera are able to work out the origin of the species, with the help of a marine biologist, Stephen Shin, who apparently was involved in the early training of Aquaman, but had a falling out and tried to kill him. He is able to determine the nature of the creatures, and Aquaman and Mera track them to their lair on a geothermal vent. They also find a crashed vessel there, which will have repercussions in a later story. Aquaman's abilities are demonstrated to include enhanced hearing, strength and the ability to leap small buildings. The orange shirt is bulletproof scale armour.

The next story involves Aquaman being called in to a navy base, where an artefact recovered from the trench has been activated and is sending out a signal. A mysterious craft comes to claim it, attacking the base, and Aquaman boards it as it takes off, though it is damaged and crashes in a desert...

The final story involves Mera going to town to buy food for the dog they acquired at the end of the Trench. The shopkeeper is a hands-on kind of guy, and Mera doesn't react well to uninvited familiarity. The attending officers are called to a hostage situation so she `surrenders' to them and is in the back of the car when they reach the scene of the crisis. She then demonstrates just how powerful water-based powers are, before returning home with her shopping...

THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE

"The Trench" establishes the current status of Aquaman and Mera and the world they inhabit. It is a fairly straightforward story, presenting us with a race of humanoid creatures that rise from the bottom of the abyssal plain - the trench of the title - and attack a coastal town, eating and kidnapping the inhabitants. The creatures are an intelligent species of some sort, which have come to the surface looking for food, and find plenty of us. Despite the best efforts of the authorities to hinder them, Aquaman and Mera are able to work out the origin of the species, with the help of a marine biologist, Stephen Shin, who apparently was involved in the early training of Aquaman, but had a falling out and tried to kill him. He is able to determine the nature of the creatures, and Aquaman and Mera track them to their lair on a geothermal vent. They also find an old crashed Atlantean vessel there, which will have repercussions in a later story. The creatures have absorbed some of the Atlantean language from the ship. Aquaman and Mera rescue a number of humans who have been `cocooned' for storage, and Aquaman seals the fissure the creatures live in, by cracking one of the volcanic vents, presumably destroying the creatures... They also acquire a rescue dog from the attacked town at the end of the story.

The next story involves Aquaman being called in to a navy base, where an artefact recovered from the trench has been activated and is sending out a signal. A mysterious craft comes to claim it, attacking the base, and Aquaman boards it as it takes off, discovering the crew to be Atlantean, though it is damaged in the ensuing fight and crashes in a desert with just the one apparent survivor... who is eventually rescued by the US Navy.

The artefact is a kind of black-box flight recorder, and the modern-day Atlanteans have come to retrieve it. After the crash in the desert, Aquaman sees a hologram message from the captain of the old ship, who was on a mission to track down a mysterious enemy who was threatening to sink Atlantis through the use of a power that allowed him to control the seas themselves. There is also a reference to a `secret' that the Atlantean King and Queen had kept from their people.

Now, apart from the question of where that desert is, assuming we started from a naval base near Boston, there are a few things that don't quite add up. The original crashed craft is an `ancient' Atlantean ship, which Aquaman refers to as being "centuries old" from before the sinking of the "continent". I know this is not our Earth, where continents can't sink - see the BBC series Earth Story for plate tectonics and related topics - though sea levels can rise and fall to submerge coastal areas, and bits of land can undergo volcanic changes. Also, as it is reiterated in the story, no one knows if Atlantis really exists, or where it is, so it is unlikely to have sunk in recorded history, so it must have been more than `centuries' ago. In the real world, of course, Atlantis has been downgraded from a continent to a city-state, more in keeping with the original story and modern geology. Hopefully, the author will give us a better explanation when we finally get to the bottom of it all.

The final story involves Mera going to town to buy food for the dog they acquired at the end of the Trench. The shopkeeper is a hands-on kind of guy, as his shop assistant knows to her cost, but Mera doesn't react well to uninvited familiarity and breaks his arm. The attending officers are called to a hostage situation while confronting her, so she `surrenders' to them and is in the back of the car when they reach the scene of the crisis. She then demonstrates just how powerful water-based powers are, before returning home to find the shop assistant has come to thank her, and brings her a dog care-package. We also get a flashback to Mera's early training for her mission to kill Aquaman, before renouncing it when she finally gets to know him. Her father appears to be leader of an unknown, possibly Atlantean, colony, and adds her to his list as a result of her treason.

The story ends with Aquaman announcing that they must find out who sank Atlantis... And the implication from the flashbacks appears to be that Mera's people might be involved...
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aquaman Rocks!, 27 Sept. 2012
As someone who has recently rediscovered my childhood love for DC comic books (via The New 52 revival) I must confess I was never a fan of Aquaman. That doesn't mean I disliked him, just that I could take him or leave him. However, there was something about him I liked as I read Justice League: Origin Vol: 1 - that coupled with the cover art of this release and I ordered myself a copy...

So glad I did. This book is simply fantastic. Everything works for me - the story, the writing, and the artwork is fantastic. Aquaman has now become one of my favourite heroes alongside Bats himself and Nightwing. The relationship between the main characters is well portrayed and the humour, whilst subtle, is effective.

I'm already awaiting the release of the next volume. I totally recommend this!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Return of the Sea King, 5 Oct. 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
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I admit I'm one of those people who used to scoff at Aquaman, seeing him as a character long out of date and too cheesy to continue into the 21st century. So it's a pleasant surprise that I read "The Trench" and not only enjoyed it but was genuinely impressed with this character and his world as presented by the skilled minds of writer Geoff Johns and artist Ivan Reis.

My opinion of Aquaman is widely shared and the character has been mocked on popular comedy shows like "Saturday Night Live" and "Family Guy" so it's good to see Johns address these in the opening chapter of the book. It seems no one in Aquaman's world really respects him either! He's constantly being made fun of by law enforcement officers and members of the public, stoically ignoring their barbs and saving their ungrateful lives anyway. While some superheroes have a hard time with the public because they're alien (Superman) or perceived as criminals themselves (Batman), Aquaman may be the first superhero whom the public acknowledge as a hero but don't take seriously because his very existence seems so silly. It makes for an interesting perspective in comics, one I've never seen before.

Arthur Curry aka Aquaman is living with his girlfriend Mera aka Aquawoman (a mermaid who is able to control water in all its forms psychically) in Amnesty Bay on the East Coast of America where he grew up with his (now deceased) father. Sea monsters from beneath the trench of the Atlantic Ocean emerge and begin abducting the townspeople of Amnesty Bay en masse, taking them down to the depths to feed to their queen - Aquaman to the rescue!

Johns sets up the world of Aquaman nicely, especially for new readers to the character (like me), as he retells part of Aquaman's story in flashbacks along with the fragments of the backstories of important characters like his dad, Dr Shin, and Mera. Johns doesn't explain Atlantis or why Arthur has chosen not to become King of Atlantis but this is hinted at as being addressed in future books.

Having seen Aquaman in action, I buy his superhero status fully and found myself engrossed in his story. He's a sympathetic and likeable hero with a lot of potential for further adventures. Johns and Reis treat him with dignity and seriousness and anyone who thought of him as a joke beforehand will think differently after reading this (at least he's no more mock-able than any other superhero). "The Trench" is a brilliant start to a great character. With Johns and Reis in the driving seat, I'll definitely pick up further books in this series. Aquaman is one of the surprise must-reads of the New 52.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aquaman is Cool!, 22 Feb. 2014
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I was one of those nerds who liked Aquaman in the 70s, as a kid, but I never really got into him much after that so I was really looking forward to this one, especially with Geoff Johns at the helm. I really loved it. This one is going to be added to my lists! Excellent story of some vicious deep-water humanoid/marine life-forms that rise above their depths in search of one thing, food, meat - that is. A great story, scary looking bad guys, some empathy going both ways and a story that concludes in this volume but leaves a trace element behind to start the next story arc. Aquaman is a funny guy; I like him. The book has plenty of humour at his expense as he's talked about as "nobodies favourite superhero". Well, I'm joining his fan club, he's cute, ripped, blond and I like orange! LOL Aquaman's background is ventured into with flashbacks of him and his father, Mr. Shin is still around and we learn his background with Arthur and most of all Arthur and Mera's relationship is explained enough that we get where they've been. Mera is awesome. Probably my favourite female I've met in the New 52 so far. She is 100% female, feminine, loves her man with passion *and* can kick but just as good as he can, only she doesn't need to have a very good reason to .... so don't mess with Mera!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Call Aquaman lame after this. I dare you., 26 Mar. 2013
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Aquaman has been the laughing stock of the DC universe, often trivialized as the guy who speaks to dolphins. Geoff Johns kicks the asses of Aquaman's detractors and is sure to pull in new fans. The writing is superb, typical Johns and the artwork is impressive.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Decent, 3 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Aquaman Vol. 1: The Trench (The New 52) (Aquaman Series) (Kindle Edition)
I know the DC characters, Superman, Batman and Green Lantern but I've never read an Aquaman novel before. I found the story and Aquaman better than I expected. I specifically liked the way the dialogue made fun of itself by drawing reference to how lame Aquaman is usually perceived to be.

I read the book off my iPad through the kindle app. The images displayed nicely in high definition. This is the first graphical novel I have read on kindle and I liked the function which allows you to touch an image and then the panel enlarges for you to study it in more detail. I can't fault the kindle comic reader, it was much better than I thought it might be.

The story itself centred on some sea creatures who leave the ocean in search of food and ends with Aquaman attempting to answer the question of who sank Atlantis. I must admit that the story seemed to end quicker than usual, which meant there was less dialogue and more large spread images covering whole pages, I.e. Less panels than typically encountered.

Overall very enjoyable and I expect I will be reading volume 2.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Continuity-crushing aside, a very good effort, 7 May 2014
This, then, is that ultimate rarity: a best-selling Aquaman comic. Like the Phantom Stranger, he's one of my favourites; and like the Phantom Stranger, there are times when I think the Marine Marvel is best-suited as a team member or guest-star: he just can't seem to hold down his own title. But this latest series (his fifth on-going) was, for a while, near the top of the sales charts - it's far too early to hope I might one day get to hold an 'Aquaman' issue 100 in my hands, but this is a good start! (As is the recent publication of an additional series, 'Aquaman and the Others' - an Aquaman spin-off series? Unheard of!)

It's not just sales-wise that this is a good start: Geoff Johns has created a very nice comic here. There are some bits I could do without: Aquaman's sudden ability to leap tall buildings with a single bound; Mera's tough-talkin' babe personality; the apparent loss of the one-hour-out-of-water limit; the fact that the so-called surface world sees him as a joke ("How does it feel to be no-body's favourite super-hero?") But set against that there's the fact that the Aquaman featured here is even-tempered, something he hasn't been for far too long; that he and Mera aren't at each other's throats, as they often have been in previous years (this despite Mera being an assassin sent to kill him); and Aquadog! Yes, that's right - Aquaman finally gets a pet dog. So, he can't swim - as Mera says, "We'll have to teach him".

The main storyline is about a group of strange marine creatures who suddenly appear in a small seaside town (chillingly their leader, spying a human, comments "There's food up here"). In much the same way as alien invaders always had the misfortune to pick Smallville as their landing site, these aquatic cannibals manage to pick the town in which Aquaman and Mera live. This is the start of a four issue arc that, in the usual manner of today's comics, could have been shorter if only they'd cut down on the fighting, but it serves to introduce this latest version of Aquaman and trundles along at a decent pace, with pleasing art by Ivan Reis and Joe Prado - indeed, the cover to the TP is probably their worst work of the entire book.

It's a shame previous continuity apparently has been ditched without explanation (the evidence being the increased powers - Mera appears to have super-strength as well - and there being no mention of the murdered Aquababy, although hopefully that means we'll be spared yet another 'final battle' with the tot's killer, Black Manta). But I will definitely be buying the next TP of the new Aquaman's adventures - I can forgive Johns anything now he's finally given us an Aquadog...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Finally, Arthur gets the respect he deserves., 7 Dec. 2013
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Aquaman has had a tough time of it. He's the King of Atlantis, rules the seas, has super strength and can communicate telepathically with sealife. Yet for some reason, he's always been seen as a bit of a joke. With the New 52, all that has been set to rights.

I have plenty of criticisms of the New 52 (Diana's new origin story for starters), but here, they have excelled themselves. DC are sometimes criticised for letting the action take over the character development, but that isn't an issue here. The basic premise is that Aquaman and his wife Mera decide to make a life for themselves on land. But it's not easy for them. He is constantly reminded that people see him as a joke and Mera struggles deeply with making the adjustment from Queen of Atlantis to regular girl living in the human world.

The action comes in the form of an ancient race of very hungry sea creatures from beyond the deep who want to use humans as food. But this is sort of incidental. What's really to love here is getting to know Arthur and watch him finally get the storylines and character development he deserves.

The art work is fantastic and fans of Green Lantern will already know that Geoff Johns doesn't disappoint.

There are some character/writer pairings that are considered the "definitive" collection - Gail Simone with Wonder Woman, Walter Simonson with Thor, Grant Morrison with Superman - I think in time, Geoff Johns with Aquaman will earn the same spot in history as these pairings.
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