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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read the book ... watch the movie,, 17 Sep 2001
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: A Portrait of Jennie (Hardcover)
I watched the movie several times. Even bought the video. Then I read the book. I suggest that you do it the other way around. Both have their strong points. The feel is the same. However the book allowed other people to see and interact with Jennie. In the movie only Eben sees Jennie. The portrait in the bar is different; it is probably some adjustment for the time of the movie. And the ending is different. I am not sure which ending I like best. One interesting notation on the movie, it was shot with a filter that made the movie have a texture that looks like a portrait.
Any way I do not want to describe the plot. So I will tell you that it was nicer to get the Hardcover Buccaneer book, than some old yellowing thing from a secondhand store that costs just as much. I have it next to the video and still re-read it periodically.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A dreamy, enchanting and haunting fable of timeless love., 6 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: A Portrait of Jennie (Hardcover)
"Starving artist" Eben Adams (undernourished physically, spiritually and emotionally) meets a little girl in the cold winter twilight in Central Park. She is alone, dressed in old fashioned clothes. She asks Adams to: "wait for me to grow up."Thus begins a relationship that will unlock Adams' artistic vision, and lead him to greater success than he could imagine. But more than that, Adams' relationship with the evocative and mysterious Jennie Appleton frees him to explore emotional horizons beyond the esperience of our everyday lives. A beautiful love story and an uplifting statement of faith in the goodness and purpose of life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Sweet, sad, story, 23 Nov 2007
This review is from: A Portrait of Jennie (Hardcover)
This story follows the frustrating and unfulfilling life of Eben Adams, a painter. By chance, one evening when he is walking home, through a shopping centre, he begins talking to a young girl who is playing hopscotch. The strange conversation ends with the young girl asking Eben to 'wait' for her to grow up, and then she walks away.

Eben is then inspired to paint various portraits of Jennie, and so begins a period of wonderful creative productivity. Thus, Jennie becomes his muse, and also helps bring his painting career on in leaps and bounds. His paintings of Jennie sell, something which he is unaccustomed to.

Eben then encounters Jennie again, when she is slightly further on in childhood, and then on various other occasions when she is in the first flushes of womenhood. We as the reader notice how swiftly Jennie seems to grow, and so does Eben. Nevertheless, he is still inspired by Jennie and more of his portraits sell. Then on another occasion, when Jennie has blossomed into a woman, the relationship between her and Eben develops into romance. Sadly, unhappiness ensues and great tragedy unfurls.

This is a tremendously sad book, dreamy and tinged with the hazy melancholy of nostalgia. It's never quite clear whether Jennie is a ghost, and neither does it matter. As a study of the artist, and the relationship between art, love and obsession, 'Portrait Of Jennie' is a truly exquisite little gem, beautifully narrated and fraught with emotion. This is a thoroughly sweet and touching story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A HAUNTING STORY..., 21 May 2006
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Portrait of Jennie (Paperback)
This book, first published in 1940, was adapted to film in 1948, which film starred Joseph Cotton and Jennifer Jones. I was sufficiently intrigued by the film, so as to want to read the book upon which the film was based but was surprised to discover, however, that the book is more of a novella, as it runs a scant one hundred and twenty-five pages in length. While not lengthy, it is, nonetheless, a haunting story, although it differs is some respects from the film.

The book tells the story of a young, struggling artist in New York named Eben Adams, who is really little more than a hack. One winter night in 1938, a down and out Eben is in Central Park, having been unsuccessful in selling his paintings. There, he encounters a very young girl named Jennie Appleton, who is mysteriously in the park by herself, playing hopscotch. Thus, begins Eben's acquaintance with Jennie.

Eben sketches a picture of Jennie, which to his surprise, he is able to sell. Periodically, Jennie begins appearing in his life at odd times, always swathed in mystery as to her origins and always appearing somehow older than expected each time he sees her. Eben continues to sketch her, finding that he can sell those sketches with ease. Inspired by his muse, he paints her portrait, a masterpiece that eventually lands in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

He is puzzled, nonetheless, by the anomaly and mystery that surrounds Jennie, who has an air of being from another time. Yet, an unusual bond is developing between them, one that not even the vagaries of time can break. It is also one that becomes increasingly romantic over time, as Jennie quickly grows into womanhood. The fates, however, Eben finds, can be cruel.

Those who enjoy romantic stories with supernatural portents will very much enjoy this haunting tale of two star crossed individuals.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A HAUNTING STORY..., 13 Oct 2005
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: A Portrait of Jennie (Hardcover)
This book, first published in 1940, was adapted to film in 1948, which film starred Joseph Cotton and Jennifer Jones. I was sufficiently intrigued by the film, so as to want to read the book upon which the film was based but was surprised to discover, however, that the book is more of a novella, as it runs a scant one hundred and twenty-five pages in length. While not lengthy, it is, nonetheless, a haunting story, although it differs is some respects from the film.
The book tells the story of a young, struggling artist in New York named Eben Adams, who is really little more than a hack. One winter night in 1938, a down and out Eben is in Central Park, having been unsuccessful in selling his paintings. There, he encounters a very young girl named Jennie Appleton, who is mysteriously in the park by herself, playing hopscotch. Thus, begins Eben's acquaintance with Jennie.
Eben sketches a picture of Jennie, which to his surprise, he is able to sell. Periodically, Jennie begins appearing in his life at odd times, always swathed in mystery as to her origins and always appearing somehow older than expected each time he sees her. Eben continues to sketch her, finding that he can sell those sketches with ease. Inspired by his muse, he paints her portrait, a masterpiece that eventually lands in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
He is puzzled, nonetheless, by the anomaly and mystery that surrounds Jennie, who has an air of being from another time. Yet, an unusual bond is developing between them, one that not even the vagaries of time can break. It is also one that becomes increasingly romantic over time, as Jennie quickly grows into womanhood. The fates, however, Eben finds, can be cruel.
Those who enjoy romantic stories with supernatural portents will very much enjoy this haunting tale of two star crossed individuals.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book I have ever read, 21 July 2013
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This review is from: Portrait of Jennie (Kindle Edition)
I saw the film when I was10 years old. I saw it again when I was 25. Now of course easy access to films is easy so now I own the film. Jennifer Jones plays Jennie.

Anyway the novella is slightly different to the film but it's one of those other way around things -- ie see the film first and then read the book. There are a lot of guys out there who will actually admit to crying out loud reading this romantic novel. They wont tell their mates and they wont quite believe it of themselves that such a cleverly written crafted story can have such an intense effect.

This will live with you forever . It did with me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read the book..... Watch the movie, 21 Jun 2004
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Portrait of Jennie (Paperback)
I watched the movie several times. Even bought the video. Then I read the book. I suggest that you do it the other way around. Both have their strong points. The feel is the same. However the book allowed other people to see and interact with Jennie. In the movie only Eben sees Jennie. The portrait in the bar is different; it is probably some adjustment for the time of the movie. And the ending is different. I am not sure which ending I like best. One interesting notation on the movie, it was shot with a filter that made the movie look like a portrait.
Any way I do not want to describe the plot. I keep the book next to the video and still re-read it periodically.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Watch the film of the same name!, 26 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Portrait of Jennie (Kindle Edition)
Having seen the film many years ago I decided to get the book via Kindle. Certainly worth reading. Not the best writing I have ever enjoyed, but still a very engaging tale, especially if you have a soft spot for romantic fiction.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read the book..... Watch the movie, 6 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I watched the movie several times. Even bought the video. Then I read the book. I suggest that you do it the other way around. Both have their strong points. The feel is the same. However the book allowed other people to see and interact with Jennie. In the movie only Eben sees Jennie. The portrait in the bar is different; it is probably some adjustment for the time of the movie. And the ending is different. I am not sure which ending I like best. One interesting notation on the movie, it was shot with a filter that made the movie look like a portrait.

Any way I do not want to describe the plot. So I will tell you that it was nicer to get the Hardcover Buccaneer book, than some old yellowing thing from a secondhand store that costs just as much. I keep the book next to the video and still re-read it periodically.

Portrait of Jennie
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5.0 out of 5 stars read the book ..... watch the movie, 1 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Portrait of Jennie (Paperback)
I watched the movie several times. Even bought the video. Then I read the book. I suggest that you do it the other way around. Both have their strong points. The feel is the same. However the book allowed other people to see and interact with Jennie. In the movie only Eben sees Jennie. The portrait in the bar is different; it is probably some adjustment for the time of the movie. And the ending is different. I am not sure which ending I like best. One interesting notation on the movie, it was shot with a filter that made the movie look like a portrait.
Any way I do not want to describe the plot. So I will tell you that it was nicer to get the Hardcover Buccaneer book, than some old yellowing thing from a secondhand store that costs just as much. I have it next to the video and still re-read it periodically. If you can not get the Buccaneer version this one will do.
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