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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An in-depth, fast-moving, powerfully written masterpeice!
From the moment Daughter Of The Empire is picked up, any avid reader will find themsleves helplessly involved in the novel, and glad of it.
Our first view of Mara is a gripping one, and within the first few pages the action has already begun. Soon we find ourselves immersed in a brilliantly written plot focusing on this seventeen year old daughter of an ancient and...
Published on 10 Jun. 2005 by _myth_

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars read part 1 and stop.
3 part series.
part one was very good. it felt like reading about seanchan empire from the wheel of time series. the ending was a bit lame.
part two was ok but felt very long but still still readable.
part three. alarm bells started ringing from the very beginning. a life shattering events takes place in the first few pages of the book, but it was as...
Published 7 months ago by RS!


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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An in-depth, fast-moving, powerfully written masterpeice!, 10 Jun. 2005
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
From the moment Daughter Of The Empire is picked up, any avid reader will find themsleves helplessly involved in the novel, and glad of it.
Our first view of Mara is a gripping one, and within the first few pages the action has already begun. Soon we find ourselves immersed in a brilliantly written plot focusing on this seventeen year old daughter of an ancient and powerful house, the Acoma, and the sacrifices she has to make for its continuance. Left with few friends, little strength and many allies eager to obliterate the Acoma after the death of Mara's father and brother, lord and heir to the title of Lord of the Acoma, Mara must prove herself as a worthy player of the game of the council, using wits, intelligence and no small amount of cunning to allow the continuance of the Acoma line.
Journeying through the fast-paced and in-depth plot, we follow Mara as she marries a violent son of one of her greatest enemies to secure an ally and a son, bravely commands the respect of the alien cho ja race and ventures into the winlderness to face the hardened ruffian 'grey-warriors' who will form most of the Acoma garrison, commanded by the fiesty Lujan.
With fantastic characters, a plot that has you constantly on the edge of your seat and immensely cunning plots on the behalf of a strong, feminine leader, this book will never remain on your shelf for long. Cry over the fate of Papewaio, stand bravely at the side of force commander Keyoke, smile at the motherly intentions of Nacoya, first advisor to the great house and follow Arakasi, spy commander, into the shadows of his immense spy network; not to mention the hate we muster for Buntokapi, Mara's violent alchoholic husband and Jingu of the Minwanabi, the house that Mara has strived to obliterate to lay the spirit of her murdered father and brother to rest.
A great read, no doubt about it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A spin off that almost eclipses its inspiration, 20 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
Lets be clear here, we all know (or should know) that in regards to writing, the dreaded collaboration can easily result in a work inferior to what either writer could have manage on their own. The Empire trilogy is not just an exception to that, but a shining example of how such a project can (almost) outstrip the individual work of the authors involved.

Politics, intrigue, magic, mayhem and complete immersion in the quasi oriental home world of the Tsurani, help make this an entertaining and thoroughly enjoyable read (if perhaps a little derivative of James Clavell's Shogun). The strength of this stand alone spin off is such that were it spinning away from anything less popular than the Riftwar saga, it probably would have long ago eclipsed its inspiration.

The bottom line? If you read and enjoyed the Riftwar Saga it's hard to imagine you'd dislike the Empire books. If on the other hand you haven't read it then your better off starting with Magician, its better (just) and reading this first may spoil some aspects of it (incidentally, if you're confused regarding continuity read this series after Darkness at Sethanon).
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 17 Feb. 2005
By 
Ms. H. Sinton "dragondrums" (Ingleby Barwick. U.K.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
This is the first of a trilogy of books set in the fantasy world of Kelewan (first mentioned in Raymond Feists brilliant Magician). Kelewan is an oriental type world, very reminiscent of feudal Japan, where protocol is paramount.
Mara is a young woman living in a world where women are submissive to the men in their lives. When her father dies and her brother is killed Mara finds herself alone with few friends to help her and many enemies who would like to see her destroyed.
This is the story of a young girl who battles against her upbringing in order to survive and to become the most powerful woman of her time. I don't want to give any more of the story away but suffice to say that Feist, partnered with Janny Wurts has produced a masterpiece of fantasy that will surely become a classic. This trilogy is a 'must have' on the bookshelves of any fantasy fan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chronological reviews ..... This one is Spectacularly Good !!!!, 1 Jan. 2013
By 
A. Cresswell "Bubblefish777 - Born again Diver" (london, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
I started to re-read all of Raymond feists works in a chronological order this time instead of the order they were published. It gives the whole riftwar saga a better spin .... or it does in some cases....

SO intially it goes
Magician 5 stars
Jimmy the HAND 2 Stars
Horored Enemy 4 stars
Murder in LaMuT 3 stars.
Daughter of the Empire 5 stars
and so on ... look for the rest of the reviews in the coming months.

Daughter of the Empire is the only collaboration to date that really came out well. The other co-authored books set in the Rift War fell far short of the standard set by magician and from what I can glean from interviews with Raymond Feist he acknowledges he made a mistake. However the trilogy started with Janny Wurts is fantastic. I was fading fast in reading a lot of Raymond's 3 other joint ventures after magician but this was so good. I had fogotten just how good this was. I do chance the label of being branded a heretic by the Feist Fan Club but I would say this is as good as magician ... it might even be better. Certainly one of the best books I've read in a long long time. Oddly enough some of Janny's other stuff doesn't do it for me. Strange. Still this trilogy is definately top alongside Gemmeland others. Anyway in case you don't know what this is about it's set on Kelewan the 'japanese' themed world on the otherside of the rift to Midkemia. It's a bout a young girl about to take her vows in a sacred priesthood pulled suddenly out of the order to run her fathers estate, one of the houses of the empire. She must chart a path to keep her name and legacy alive while the plots and politics of the empire conspire to destroy her family name for eternity. Great book.
Thoroughly recommended.
Buy It.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thrilling Read!, 11 April 2000
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
Daughter of the Empire immerses the reader in a new dimension of science fiction. An imaginative plot that evolves intelligently and at a well timed pace, along with well-developed and genuinely interesting characters form the focus of this novel. Readers will find elements of romance, humour, drama and surprise finely interweaved in the fabric of the storyline. The plot evolves around on the life of a young girl, Mara, who inherits her father's seemingly defenceless estates when her father's army is betrayed and decimated. Casting aside all remorse and bitterness, Mara must discover her leadership talents and master them to achieve the upper hand in a dangerous game of political intrigue. Intelligent and crafty, she will seek to gain trust, friendship and above all confidence to face her enemies which plan her demise. Mara's emotional conflicts, her strengths and weaknesses are the elements of a character so human that it is impossible not to relate to. A story of friendship, family, honour and destiny, the book explores to its full depth the magic of the human spirit. It is both impossible to put this book down once you've picked it up and not to buy the rest of the trilogy once you've read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning end to the first book, 19 Feb. 2010
By 
Ms. K. Arthur - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
I have literally just finished reading this book, and wow, what a book!
A story of despair, sorrow, triumph, hate, cunning and so much more, this book surpasses what I expected and now I have to read the second part whilst finishing my university studies!

I've not read Raymond Feist before (or Janny Wurts); I happened to pick up this book and read the first few pages, and it gripped me to the point where I was walking around town with my nose in the book just to see what happened next.

An amazing story, I truly cannot wait to read the next chapter of Mara of Acoma's life, and see what dangers she has to face.

You have to read this book, it will grip you like none other, and make you feel as if you are standing beside each character, feeling what they feel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magnificent read, 16 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
Welcome to the world of Kelewan that was first introduced in Feist's Riftwar saga. This world has to be the most alien world in fantasy reading that I have ever come across-the creatures and the the political structure of the world. Into this comes Mara who has to survive the death of her father and brother and bring her house through political intrigue. Whilst magic features in the series (quite heavily in the third book), it is a bit part player to the political manovering. I love this series, Mara is well written (as are the other characters) and you see her develop naturally into an important player in Kelewan. If you have not read it and like strong female characters and fantasy then please get this, it is worth buying and reading
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterful, 9 Mar. 2013
By 
J. McAllister - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
I just finished reading this trilogy again for the third time, after reading it first twenty years ago. That should say something! The characters, the struggle, the backdrop just suck you in, and you are genuinely rooting for their cause. I'm left with an image of the characters faces as if they are real people I've known. From the genre angle this book is a cross between Magician and James Clavell's Shogun (there's a Lord Bunto in both I believe! ;) ). Though this is a collaboration between Raymond E Feist and Janny Wurts somehow they managed to produce a book that is much better than anything written by them individually. Buy the book, it's well worth a read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Daughter of the Empire, 4 Aug. 2011
By 
Book Addict "jackie" (ABERGAVENNY, MONMOUTHSHIRE United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Daughter Of The Empire (Paperback)
Mara is thrust into the role of leadership following the death of her father and brother. Difficult choices await if she and her house are to survive.
If you enjoy a well written and fully realised epic fantasy story, then this book is for you.
It is the first part of a trilogy featuring a female protagonist.
If you are a man and are 'put off' this book by the fact that the lead is female, you should know that there are many strong men who would be great lead characters in their own right.
The world in which she lives seems to have at its roots the medieval empire of Japan. The focus on honour, ritual suicide, and warfare between competing families,is neatly counterbalanced by the careful code of manners and courtesy that must be adhered to by the nobles. One mis-step can result in disaster, and cause a rift that can precipitate everlasting hatred between families or even war.
You won't always approve of Mara's actions, indeed, at times you may not even admire her particularly. But every choice she makes is limited by and dictated by the culture of the society in her world. Because this is a world where women are submissive to the men in their lives.
In order to ensure the safety of her house she marries the son of a rival house and has a child, thus ensuring at least one ally in the battle against the clan who have vowed to obliterate her and her house from existence.
She forges an alliance with a race of alien beings to produce to funds she needs to buy an army, and enlists the aid of outlaws by giving them a chance to regain their honour.
I enjoyed this book very much. Besides Mara there are a host of strong characters, Arakasi the spy, Nacoya her nurse,and Keyoke her force commander.
The world of Kelewan is both beautiful and dangerous, and I'm looking forward to reading the second part of the trilogy.
Daughter of the Empire
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5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning return to form from the author of the Magician series, 29 Mar. 2011
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This review is from: Daughter of the Empire (Paperback)
Vivid, intricate, superb. While the characters of Feists' other works sometimes feel a little flat or unreal, the cast of the Empire series is stunningly well drawn, each with a complex emotional make-up and fluent, realistic attitudes. I have not yet read any of Janny Wurts' work, but it seems to me that it is down to her influence that these characters have come so much to life. The detail and scope of this work is amazing, and having read the series twice now I find it as engaging as the first time.

The plot is quite different from Feists' other work as well, focusing more on the alien culture with its political and economic variety than in previous series. The personal stories mix well, and the dynastic element makes for a compelling central point in the narrative. It also ties in with earlier and later series based in Midkemia, with cameo appearances from well known characters such as Pug, which is pleasing to anyone who reads the rest of Feists' works.

Sharing my opinion with other fantasy fans, I have heard complaints that this book takes too much influence from the Orient and Samurai traditions, but personally I find this to be a welcome change to the usual European background and its Arthurian base of 'sword and sorcery'. The grand political background lends a particular feel to this series I have not found elsewhere, except perhaps in Herberts' masterpiece, Dune.

A beautiful piece of writing, both in terms of description and plot, I would recommend to any scifi or fantasy fans as a welcome change from the usual.
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Daughter of the Empire by Janny Wurts
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