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4.7 out of 5 stars91
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 6 September 2012
Andy Coogans life story is truly incredible and I am sure there are many other men and women who who suffered at the hand of the Japanese
who did not survive to tell the tale.The fact he came from a working class background and lived in deprived areas of Glasgow Springburn and the Gorbels the stories from these places will be familiar to people all over the United Kingdom as they existed all over the country.Such a beginning must have gave him a head start in the survival stakes and enabled him to adapt to his changed circumstances in the Jungle.This book is a must read for all.
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on 2 October 2012
If you like a good,well told war story,then this is a book for you.From start to finish you wont be able to put it down and I love a book like this.Reading the story its hard to believe what those soliders went through and to come through all that and write a book, fantastic.So much of war is never told by those who were part of it,then a book comes along like this and makes you think about the things we all moan about and is it really worth moaning about.You make your own views on this book,but I would say you wont be disappointed.5 stars from me.
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on 9 November 2013
I liked the book but felt that the title is not an accurate depiction of it (hence the 3 stars rather than 4). This is more a biography of Andy Coogan rather than a book which centres on the Japanese war camps. Much of the book concentrates on Andy's life before the war whilst his war experience is really secondary to the story of the man himself. Don't get me wrong, its still fascinating to read about an ordinary hero but I think it may not be for those who thought the book centred on the man's experience of Japanese concentration Camps.
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on 8 July 2013
I had a keen interest in this book as Andy was my athletics coach in the late 80's and early 90's, and he was an inspiration to all of us at that time.

It is a harrowing but fantastic read and a real insight into the horrors that he and many of his comrades faced during the time of captivity.

I couldn't recommend this higher - a fantastic read. It couldn't have been easy for him to relive this and put it down on paper, but it will be enlightening for many, many people.
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on 10 December 2013
If you want to know how it felt to be a Prisoner of War and held captive by the Japanese, then this book is for you. It is an honestly written book by an ex-soldier many years after his release from the camps. He has had many years to reflect on his time as a prisoner, and to remember over and over the treatment that was dealt out to him and many other soldiers. The book is not written to be sensational....more to be as factual as possible. Excellent read!
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on 17 December 2012
An excellent book from a man who has experienced more in a few years than most people experience in a lifetime.

The stories of his youth are a fascinating insight into life in early 20th century Glasgow and his experiences of WW2 are harrowing in the savagery he encountered and heartwarming in the camaraderie he participated in.

'Lest we forget' might be an appropriate sub text to this most excellent book.
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on 4 November 2012
The man this book is about lives in my town and goes to our church. He is a lovely man who over the years has trained many young people in athletics. Not as mobile now but brought Olympic torch to church a few weeks ago when someone gave an account of his life during the war. A great legacy to be left for the next generation to read. This is true history.
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on 7 October 2012
This is an amazing story by an amazing man who is Chris Hoy's relation and inspiration. It's a can't put down book, "man's inhumanity to man" (it must be remembered that all nations are capable of inhumanity, not one) and also countered by opposite touches of humanity. A 'Must Read' delivered quickly through Amazon.
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on 3 June 2014
Most of the book is about his running back ground, which is a little bit boring.
When he is in the army and later on captured the story is great but not as detailed as his running.
To survive what he went through is amazing and a disappointment that this book didn't cover it more.
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on 2 February 2015
The way this book is written makes it easier to understand the horror of the subject without getting too emotional (I have a parent who was a Far East Prisoner of War). The title made it look a gruesome story and although it is not a pleasant subject matter, tomorrow you die is only a small part nearer the end. Although it should be remembered the author could of died on any of the tomorrows, such is the nature of his journey through captivity.
I was glad to have read it and can only have the greatest admiration for Andy Googan. His sporting life helped him through and he has passed these skills on to many younger others. Well done sir.
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