Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 6 July 1999
Another excellent installment in the Midkemia books started with 'Magician'. Old favourites like Nakor and his everlasting bag of oranges return. My brother couldn't read the Midkemia books because he found a character called Pug hard to take seriously. Get past this and you find perhaps one of the best developed Magician characters going. His ideas of his limitations mean that you will not find impossible situations fixed at the drop of a sorcerers arm, meaning Feist has to have intelligent solutions to get his other characters out of a fix.
The Hanging sequence was gripping and tense, the emotions running throught the characters real and believable.
I hope Erik Von Darkmoor is developed further.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 3 August 2004
Whether you've read REFs books from Magician onwards or not, you could still pick this up and go with it. Feist is far from the perfect writer but he has a style and method that is endearing to readers of all types.
This is the first of a series that begins some time after the RiftWar and features characters from previous books. Feist explains and introduces them within the storyline almost seamlessly.
The series hinges on serious events but builds on the lives of two characters in particular: Erik von Darkmoor and Rupert Avery, two boyhood friends who through various misfortunes, find themselves in deep, deep trouble. Just when things can't get any worse for them, it does.
Coincidentally the world of Midkemia is facing destruction from armies over-running the continent of Novindus, and when they're done there, they will probably destroy the rest of the world too.
What to do? Read on of course. Feist doesn't just produce character after character. He has them behave like normal human beings and manages to combine storylines about people, planets and existence, with unprecedented skill. They are insinuated into your own life without you being aware of it. You really want to know what happens next.
Some of the text is at times disappointing and somewhat patronising, in particular where he mixes colloquial Americanisms and 16the century English. But so what? They're rollicking good stories and despite borrowing from other fantasy writers, he puts it all together so well you don't really mind.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 7 April 2005
In this sequel to The King's Buccaneer, author Raymond Feist takes us back to his magical world of Midkemia, some twenty four years later. Erik von Darkmoor and Rupert Avery have been convicted of murder, but are offered their lives if they will join a mad scheme, joining a group of desperate men on a secret mission from which they may or may not return. The evil Pantathian snake men are hatching a new plot on the continent of Novindus, and someone needs to find out what they are up to and, if possible, to stop them. But, this is indeed a dangerous mission. Can Erik and "Roo" survive? And, what will they find in Novindus?
Raymond Feist's Riftwar books were great, with epic adventure and magic, while his later books enjoyed a somewhat smaller scope. But, with this, the first book of the Sepentwar Saga, Mr. Feist has returned to the big time. The story is grand, with adventure written as big as the continent that it takes place on! The action is gripping and will leave you on the edge of your seat - it starts on page one, and, after a somewhat slow introduction of the main characters, gains momentum, and charges through to a magical (literally) crescendo!
Yep, this is a great book, the start of a great trilogy. I like the characters and the setting, and really enjoyed the new race introduced, the reptilian Sauur. Most of all, I liked the Hall of Worlds with its fascinating inhabitants. I so hope that Mr. Feist will consider writing a book that develops the Hall of Worlds more!
So, I would say that this is a simply excellent fantasy book, one of the best that was ever written, and I highly recommend it to you. Buy this book!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
At first I was disappointed as I read this book, so much was set up in the previous two books, prince of the blood and Kings buccanear, that wasn't explored as I had hoped. A large time gap occurs between the events of kings buccanear and this book.
So it begins with completely fresh characters in a vaguely familiar world, things have changed a little, society has advanced slightly in the economicak sense anyway.
The story centres on Erik Von Darkmoor, the bastard son of a Baron in the kingdom of the isles. Erik is a young blacksmith whose life under goes dramatic turns for the worse because of the jealousies of his legitemate half brothers. On the run with his friend Roo he quickly ends up as a soldier on a secret mission to the continant of Novindus.
The serpent war saga is my favourite series in the Midkemia books, it needs to be read by YOU.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 January 2010
Very mixed feelings about this book. When I started, I got very involved with it, the events were very exciting and varied, the plot seemed like it was going somewhere, and the fact that most of the characters are VERY shallow didn't bother me much as I thought they would be developed further later on.

However, later on, things only got worse. The characters are 2D and most hold no presense in the scene. They feel like if you turned them sideways you wouldnt be able to see them anymore, essentially. This is true to such an extent that in some scenes I wasn't even aware that the main character, Erik, was even present in a scene until he was mentioned at the end of it, and I remembered that we are generally following his perspective. On top of this, many many MANY characters (there are many characters) are introduced as "a large man". What does that even mean?! Are they tall? Are they fat or muscley? What?!

On this note, why is Erik, a prisoner and lowly soldier, always present when the princes and leaders are making their big military decisions?

The interesting nature of the events declined once many events are basically repeated. There are many scenes where Erik rescues girls who are being raped, and he gets a bit angry to prove he has emotions, or realises that a random horse has a gammy foot, seemingly just to prove, yet again, in case we could forget, that he is good with horses.

Finally, at the beginning I eagerly awaited a bit of goblin slashing actions, maybe some trolls or dragons etc. If you're going to write a standard fantasy novel, these features should at least be present! Nearly all the characters are, however, human. There are some snake people, who are essentially human, and a dragon, who gets no action whatsoever. There's a sense that Feist is trying to be innovative and 'realistic' in an almost entirely stereotypical fantasy novel. However it feels like he jsut took a standard fantasy and took the interesting bits out.

Speaking of which, his writing style just screams of trying far too hard to read like a fantasy writer. Get it right or don;'t even try!

I'm focussing on the bad here, and it's not all bad, but generally I felt it was quite a poor quality novel and I was disapointed, having heard such great things of Feist. I'd recommend someone like David Eddings or Michael Moorcock for really high quality fantasy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 June 2001
i first read the riftwar saga at a friend of mines request. i wasn't really that bothered but it became great, so i read the rest. Shadow of a dark queen was the first book since "darkness at sethanon" that really caught my attention. the way the plot starts slowly and begins to unravel with erik, roo and the rest of the crimson eagles all faceing an uphill struggle to survive.every feist book should have pug in because, for me he is the essence of the books .this books also shows feist ability to write brilliant fantasy and keep the reader hooked.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 15 January 2002
Well quite simply Feist is a genius. If you are a fan of the Riftwar saga then this the first in the Serpentwar saga adds another dimension to Feist's fantasy world.
With all the broohaha of Lord of the Rings at the moment - it is refreshing to read a fantasy action story with immense depth. If you are new to Feist then start with Magician - this is for knowledgable Feist fans only.
The story is far too immense to go into too much detail here. Needless to say the Panathian serpent preists are evil bleeders.
I can't wait to read the rest of the series. My life will be empty when I have no more Fesit to read...
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 February 2000
This is a very good book. The main characters (Erik and Roo) get thrown from thier normal lives into a world of danger, living each day as if it could be threir last. This makes for a gripping read that you will not want to put down. The best part in my veiw is the Hall of Worlds. It has a very original quality about it. It is so strange that you could almost be reading part of "The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy". This part of the book looks as if it could go a long way.
If you have read other books by Feist you will find some of your well best loved characters here as well. To list a few Pug, Jimmy the hand and Nakor. When you finnish this book you will want to get the next one in your hand as soon as you can.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
This may be the most accessible of the four tales in this series. A young man named Erik is growing up in a village, unacknowledged son of the noble. After an incident he and a friend Roo are sent to be hanged and instead told they will be spared if they train as special soldiers to fight an unknown menace approaching from another continent. Not much of a choice but they accept.

An evil magic-using force on another continent is pushing an army to take over cities along a major river. When the force reaches the river estuary it will besiege and occupy the shipbuilding city. At this point it will be able to make an armada to sail across the ocean and conquer Midkemia where Erik lives. He and the squad of trained soldiers are hoping to delay that event and give the continent time to prepare for war.

If we just stayed on those lines all would be well, but the author insists on bringing in several different scattered characters who, we suppose, are from previous books. There is a dozy young man with a magic sword, who does nothing at all for most of the books. There is a magic user who can't be bothered doing anything as he is waiting in an alternate dimension with a charming woman until it's time for war. So on. These people are largely irrelevant and just give the impression of padding out the books and the story.

I liked the other books less but they were readable and it is possible that fans of this author will want to read everything about this world and enjoy the adventures more than I did.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I'm reviewing Feists' (and those involved with him) works in Chronological order. Unfortunately for some books there are new books and covers being re-released in March 2013 so reviews for the old books can no longer be posted.

Anyway this review is for the chronological reading of books by Feist and others that all link Medkemia and Kelewan and form the Riftwar Saga, Legacy and beyond. This one is for Shadow of a Dark Queen.

The order is:-

Magician 5 stars
Jimmy the Hand 2 Stars
Horored Enemy 4 stars
Murder in LaMuT 3 stars.
Daughter of the Empire 5 stars
Silverthorn 4.5 stars
Darkness at Sethanon 5 stars
Servant of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Betrayal 3 Stars
Mistress of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Assassins 3 Stars
Krondor: Tear of the Gods 3 Stars
Prince of the Blood 5.5 Stars
The Kings Buccaneer 4 Stars
SHADOW OF A DARK QUEEN 6 STARS

Review:

You know when you see something delicious ... like the perfect dish or meal and it's something you've been anticipating for weeks maybe even months and you take that first mouthful and it's everything you hoped it would be ... it's gorgeous and then suddenly you think, I wish this would never end it's so good. Well this story is delicious. I distinctly remember reading the fist 6 or 7 pages and thinking Mmmmmm. Feist at his very very best. Possibly better than Magician. It's just glorious. I rationed myself to a couple of dozen pages a day. I didn't want to get to the end but as I saw my page marker creeping that way I had to resign myself that inevitably it would come to an end. It's not that the story is particularly brilliant because it's not. It's very 'Dirty Dozen' and cliched but the writting is so good. It's a great and perfect book. I thoroughly give this 6 stars ... or in this review I do. For Amazon's sake I have to limit the actual award to 5.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.