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5.0 out of 5 stars Can Innovators Put Their Faith In Social Media?, 11 Oct 2012
This review is from: Social Media for Corporate Innovators and Entrepreneurs: Add Power to Your Innovation Efforts (Kindle Edition)
In his excellent book Social Media For Corporate Innovators and Entrepreneurs the excellent Stefan Lindegaard provides a valuable review of how social media tools can become valuable tools for organisations and individuals who are wishing to innovate.

As well as explaining the importance of Open Innovation (building in themes from his previous book `Making Innovation Work') - Lindegaard interviews innovation practitioners from organisations such as Nokia, Gijima, Beirsdorf and Psion - to see how they have incorporated social media tools into their innovation and product development plans. He explains their use through the discovery, incubation and acceleration phases of innovation management - and why their use is about more than just the latest trendy technology...

In a world that is complex, the need to find and work with the right people is still (as it always has been...) the essence of invention, creativity, capitalism, distribution and commercial success. As Beth Comstock (of GE) says `we used to think we could do everything ourselves but that isn't how the world works anymore'. Yet, most people and organisations are poor at collaborating. So how can Twitter and Facebook help with this? For Lindegaard, social media channels and skills are relevant addition to the innovation toolbox. Interestingly, he firstly devotes time to explaining the need for open innovation. This has much to do with culture and leadership style. Executives must avoiding the fear of changing how things are done and realise that to share is a valuable tactic. As he says; "The most important thing to innovation is knowledge - and getting access to knowledge" - and he goes on to say "Corporate innovators must pay more attention to terms such as preferred partner and `we're in the match making business'.

Of course, there is clearly no point in launching into dramatic customer pages in Facebook, install Yammer and encourage executives to network extensively within LinkedIn - if the innovation process is still contained within a small group in R&D, senior management and traditional players. You have to believe in open innovation, before you can really believe and benefit from the power of social media. If you do believe in open innovation however then it would be foolish not to embrace the faith and adopt social media channels. Lindegaard provides useful explanation for how to use the various channels available at different stages of innovation process, from engaging with customers and suppliers to collating market insight and finding new contacts and using gamification tactics to stimulate feedback. He shows that social media, used correctly can help to build those useful conversations both within and outside of the organisation.

So is social media simple? Well no. As Lindegaard points out `Networking does not take care of itself. Neither does innovation. This is the same with social media'. I'd recommend this book highly. Its practical, with useful tips and explanations without techno babble and social media hype.

You can read my full review of this book here [...]

And download my whitepaper on COLLABORATION here - [...]
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