Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Different strokes for different "Folks"
Here's what this CD is: a soundtrack to the central chapters of Rob Young's book of the same name. It's a wide-ranging, imaginative and hugely engaging selection of music that's in varying parts dreamy, introspective, scary and downright weird. Often simultaneously.

Here's what this CD isn't: a history of British folk or a history of British folk-rock, or a...
Published on 12 Oct 2012 by Runmentionable

versus
4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not bad but could be better
It's a good mix of music from that time but nothing rare. Would have been good to have had Heron on the discs as they played with a few groups at the time and are sorely often overlooked.
Published on 3 Oct 2012 by shrew


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Different strokes for different "Folks", 12 Oct 2012
By 
Runmentionable "Why Be A Raisin When You Can ... (Exiled Mackem) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Here's what this CD is: a soundtrack to the central chapters of Rob Young's book of the same name. It's a wide-ranging, imaginative and hugely engaging selection of music that's in varying parts dreamy, introspective, scary and downright weird. Often simultaneously.

Here's what this CD isn't: a history of British folk or a history of British folk-rock, or a collection of rarities. However, other reviewers have tackled it as if it were, and marked it down accordingly. That's an injustice, and about as logical as criticising a detective novel for being poor science fiction.

Take this for what it is, and not for what someone incorrectly assumes it is or ought to be, and a rewarding listen is guaranteed. Young's book is a study of how certain British musicians take inspiration from history, landscape, folklore, and a certain ambivalence about progress and thus produce work with a certain - for want of a less hifalutin' term - visionary and mystical sensibility (it sounds pretentious, but as Young describes things, it isn't). His narrative starts with early 20th century classical composers, and ends up, via the likes of Kate Bush, Julian Cope and Talk Talk, at contemporary "Hauntology" artists.

In between, he sees the greatest flowering of this visionary music taking place in the folk-rock era, for obvious reasons. That's the period this CD covers. There's a mix of (comparatively) big names and virtual unknowns, and some tracks are relativey famous while others are desperately obscure. Compilations being what they, are each listener will have their preferred tracks and quality control can be variable, but this merits five stars because each track sheds some light on Young's key idea.

Because Young's discussing an aesthetic perspective rather than a plodding view of what is or isn't folk or folk-rock, it's entirely right and proper that the CD finds room for prog-rock and singer-songwriters working in the same general area as what's more consensually seen as folk-rock. If you're not appalled by the prospect of something that falls outside your arbitrary genre definition appearing here, but you like the general idea of Young's hypothesis, you'll find this CD stimulating, rewarding and, who knows, maybe even a little bit visionary.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Electric Eden review, 29 Dec 2012
Rob Young's book Electric Eden is a genuine delight to read, something to savour and to revisit, a book that chronicles the convergence and melding of traditional folk-music of the British Isles with popular, classical and experimental styles over the course of the Twentieth Century and beyond, creating diverse works of art along the way that re-imagine our connectedness to the heritage of the land. This cd works as a companion to the book, focusing in upon the time-period perhaps closest to the heart of the author, the blossoming of folk and folk-rock in the 1960's and 1970's, though in the same breath I should add that he doesn't limit himself to those hazy-edged genres previously mentioned, and nor should he. As I see it, the subtitle "Unearthing Britains Visionary Music" indicates that there aren't any clearly-defined boundaries over which he shouldn't cross, so long as that "British visionary" element is present, and perhaps this collection could have been more eclectic yet without the risk of losing the plot.

Rob has done a fine job of compiling a diverse selection of artists, the first disc concentrates on acoustic music and disc two introduces electric instruments. Much of the music is pastoral in feel, some is firmly rooted in the ground whilst others levitate above the ground on psychedelic journeys. Both discs contain tracks by the big names of the day alongside more obscure artists, creating a fascinating collection with discoveries to be made around every corner. As with all compilation cds some people might be disgruntled with the omission or inclusion of certain bands or songs, but space is very finite, and to me he has clearly put a lot of thought into each track and moreover the task of refining it down to these particular pieces must have been a mammoth labour of love.

I give the cd 5 stars because it's a delight and I think it makes a fine companion-piece to the book, giving the book a sonic dimension, but I also find myself wondering if it would have been better yet had Rob included music from across the entire scope of the book rather than just one time-period. Creating such a collection on two discs would have been a really tall order, but I can imagine approaching it in one of two ways: either by dipping into the Discographic Timeline at the back of the book for a representative selection, or choosing a couple of tracks relevant to each chapter. I'm not familiar with much of the pre-60's music he talks about and would be curious to hear some to help create a deeper context for the later music. Also it would be fascinating to see him pencilling in a line from Arnold Bax through Ralph Vaughan Williams to Ewan MacColl, Martin Carthy, Pentangle, Kate Bush, Talk Talk, to the Boards Of Canada and onwards - I'm not aware of any other compilation out there that takes such a journey.

I am very happy to own a copy of this compilation, and I'm itching to explore the work of a number of artists that are featured on here whom I have previously not been acquainted with. I see that this collection has the catalogue number EDEN001, so I for one look forward very much to EDEN002.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great musical companion to an excellent book., 17 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Electric Eden: Unearthing Britain's Visionary Music [+digital booklet] (MP3 Download)
I loved Rob Ewen's book, and although I thought my knowledge of 'folk' music was pretty good, this compilation let me hear lots of songs I didn't know. Essential companion piece, but also a great collection of music that covers all eras of "Britain's Visionary Music"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars folk for the conniseur, 26 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
excellant compolation following the book
a must for any folkies old or new
a good mix to enjoy a follow up cd is a must
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Folk Music, 24 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A very comprehenshive book and CD which I have loved reading and enjoyed listening to. Much to read up on and many musical memories for me a lifetime lover of the Folk Music scene.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 10 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent !!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not bad but could be better, 3 Oct 2012
It's a good mix of music from that time but nothing rare. Would have been good to have had Heron on the discs as they played with a few groups at the time and are sorely often overlooked.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad..but some strange choices, 28 Aug 2012
By 
Sir Elias Dee "Doctor of Phanerothymology" (My physical being is on the earthly plane) - See all my reviews
If you have read the book then you'll know what to expect here although some of the track choices are rather odd. Comus I'd call prog more than anything else. The Water Into Wine Band were a Christian band who played the Christian Greenbelt Festival and supported Cliff Richard (very little pagan going on there). The Tudor lodge track is one of the least interesting MOR Radio 2 cuts from their patchy album. Meic Stevens to my ears is more like Dylan than UK Folk. Similarly Nick Drake and Bridget St. John are surely singer songwriters. There are much better Albion Band tracks than the one chosen. It's what's missing that sticks out more than anything else and whilst space must have been a limitation, if Comus is going to make it then Principal Edwards Magic Theatre is a prime contender. How about Tir Na Nog, Nigel Mazlyn Jones, Steve Ashley, Anne Briggs,Magna Carta, Decameron, Fuschia , The Strawbs, The Woods Band, The Dransfields and Storyteller ? I could go on. Not a boring listen but there are certainly much better thought out UK folk rock compilations out there.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some odd bedfellows, 8 Oct 2012
What a pleasant surprise to find a track,Country Road,from Unicorn's first album 'Uphill All The Way'saw them on tour with Steeleye Span back in the day great band
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, 8 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Bought for Brother in law who was disappointed in some of the music, but still enjoyed some of the tracks
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews