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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most beautiful book i have ever read.
It is impossible not to be carried to 'Kinraddie', in the beautiful descriptive language that Gibbon uses to capture the beauty of what could be many areas in Scotland. This book has everything, the joy and sorrow of the 3 ages of chris guthrie..from child to young lover and mother, to widowed mother of a young man in a revolutionary new scotland, the terrible loss of the...
Published on 21 Jan. 2002 by Marie A. Smith

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3.0 out of 5 stars Worth persevering with
I've only read the Sunset Song so far and I loved it. A very moving story once you get used to the style and the Scots language. It's a pity the Kindle edition does not have a glossary which the paperback version of Sunset Song does.
Published 5 months ago by Ann Hadley


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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most beautiful book i have ever read., 21 Jan. 2002
By 
Marie A. Smith "mazza1998" (scotland) - See all my reviews
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It is impossible not to be carried to 'Kinraddie', in the beautiful descriptive language that Gibbon uses to capture the beauty of what could be many areas in Scotland. This book has everything, the joy and sorrow of the 3 ages of chris guthrie..from child to young lover and mother, to widowed mother of a young man in a revolutionary new scotland, the terrible loss of the great war, the pain of childbirth and the tale of the land which chris loves. Of all the times i have read this book, i have never managed to do so without drowning the pages in tears. Simply the most wonderful book i have ever read.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Review of 'Sunset Song' from the book 'A Scots Quair' by Lewis Grassic Gibbon., 22 Jan. 2010
By 
Mr. David A. Lee (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Scots Quair (Paperback)
According to the back cover of the 2008 Canongate edition of 'A Scots Quair', the trilogy has been voted the best Scottish book of all time. I am far from qualified to endorse this view or otherwise, but it seems to me that, if the author had lived long enough to produce a significantly greater volume of work, he would be held in the same esteem today as Charles Dickens or Thomas Hardy.

The story of 'Sunset Song' traces the life of Chris Guthrie from childhood until she is widowed as a young mother as a result of the First World War. It is rich in characters and in the imaginative scenarios they enact. It is centred in the Mearns, which is defined approximately as the triangular region with vertices at Montrose, Edzell and Portlethen. Although the dialect of the area is used freely this seems natural. It does not detract from the flow, even for this Englishman, because the meaning of a strange word is usually clear from the context; there is in any case a glossary at the back of the book.

The story reflects the social climate of the period - the bitterness towards the House of Lords after it blocked the 1909 bill to introduce old age pensions - hustings at bye-elections (no TV then)- the class divide reflected by language('if folk are to get on in the world nowadays they must use the English') - the emergence of machinery in agriculture ('he'd like right well to see the damned machine that would muck you a pigsty') - a father's dictatorial role as head of the household - mentions of the workhouse and of breach of promise.

Grassic Gibbon deals sensitively and realistically with physical attraction and uses a freedom of expression denied to Hardy in the 19th century, but which is not even remotely close to that frequently evident in modern novels. The author uses humour occasionally, skilfully and appropriately.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beguiling, 6 July 2011
I read this at school as a teenager and could not make any sense of it. Forty years later I have just read it again and I found it beguiling. It bears witness to a way of life that has long since disappeared and cries out against the folly of war, of heavenly and man made creeds and captures perfectly the small town parochial gossip and snobbery which unfortunately remains in many a town still. As for Capitalism and the woes of the working man struggling under its load, it could have been written with today's banking crisis in mind. Highly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great stories. Well worth reading., 13 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: A Scots Quair (Kindle Edition)
Read all three books. Thought Sunset Song was by far the best. I could relate to the life and times covered in the story even though I was born about 40 - 50 years after the period covered in the book. Planning to attend Theatre production of Sunset Song in September. Highly recommend these books. Once you have read the first you will probably want to read the other two. Got the feeling while reading these books that they seemed to have been written by a woman. Would be interested to know whether anyone else felt the same.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Scots Quair - a beautiful story beautifully told, 20 Dec. 2012
By 
Y. Hannon "YVH" (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
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I was obliged to read this book for my Undergraduate Degree programme - but I'm so glad I came across it! The new reader will need to use the Glossary at the rear because the book is written in the "Scots" vernacular, but I ended the book at 2.30 a.m. sobbing my heart out because I was so hooked on the tale of the main character Chris (a young woman - or 'Quean' in the book) and her struggle to survive strife, loss, (brief) joy, highland crofting, husbands, etc. through the 1900s and beyond, but always with her land as something always to fall back on. If only Mr Grassic Gibbon was still alive - I'd sincerely would have liked to have met him to shake him warmly by the hand and congratulate him on this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scottish Literature at its best, 25 Aug. 2013
By 
Patricia Anne Karlstad "P1" (Norway) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Scots Quair (Paperback)
It's seldom I can lose myself in a book, but this one really is a classic. Perhaps because my own roots are from the North East of Scotland, there was a wonderful familiarity to the peole, the countryside and life in a small community. But it's more than that. Lewis Grassic Gibbons' characters, descriptions of place and storytelling mark him as one of the great Scottish novelists of any generation. A must read for anyone who enjoys great literature.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceptionally good read, 26 July 2012
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This book should feature in the list of books to read before you die! It is beautifully written with wonderful 'pictures' of rural Scotland in the early 20th century and great story lines of a crofter's daughter as she emerges into a woman. The unexpected humour coursing through the book had me laughing out loud. Very difficult to put down.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Scots Quair, 9 Mar. 2009
By 
Mr. Ronald Anderson (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Scots Quair (Paperback)
Excellent book, I had not read it for about 20 years and was, again, taken by how difficult it was to put it down. I just wonder if Ewan Tavendale jnr. has the character of Lewis Grassic Gibbon himself.
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Majestic, magnificent, mighty sweep through Scotland 20th C, 9 Oct. 2000
A trilogy focussing on the life of Chris Geddes from the mearns of Kincardine in the 1st world war to trade unionism in Dundee. Gibbon tells a story that is alive with an affirmation of life. Joy and heartbreak with a background of social history. A real woman - feminist before feminism.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A scots quair, 6 May 2014
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This review is from: A Scots Quair (Kindle Edition)
I thought the book was very true to life of that era although i found some parts very harrowing good
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A Scots Quair
A Scots Quair by Lewis Grassic Gibbon
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