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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good as usual
I thought this was a Great book, Picard meets up with old shipmates for one more adventure. But when are we going to get to new adventures with the Enterprise, shes been in drydock too long and some of the characters appeared like they had been forgotten about and just tacked on at different points in the book. Those are the only bad points because I would recommend this...
Published on 19 Nov 2005 by amcleese77

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It took you *this* long to do something, Picard?
Star Trek fans' reactions to the last movie (Nemesis) were overwhelmingly negative (and the box office showed it). However, it has been the springboard to some wonderful Star Trek books (not to mention the fact that I, basically, enjoyed the movie anyway). The A Time to... book series, the Titan series, as well as the wonderful Articles of the Federation. But what...
Published on 13 Jan 2006 by David Roy


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It took you *this* long to do something, Picard?, 13 Jan 2006
By 
David Roy (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
Star Trek fans' reactions to the last movie (Nemesis) were overwhelmingly negative (and the box office showed it). However, it has been the springboard to some wonderful Star Trek books (not to mention the fact that I, basically, enjoyed the movie anyway). The A Time to... book series, the Titan series, as well as the wonderful Articles of the Federation. But what happens to the Next Generation crew after the movie? Death in Winter, by Michael Jan Friedman, begins to answer that question. Whether it does it well is yet another question.
The Enterprise E is in drydock, being repaired after the horrible battle with Shinzon in Nemesis. But Captain Picard has more on his mind than just his ship. Doctor Beverly Crusher, the woman whom he has loved since he first met her when she was marrying his best friend Jack, has left her position on his ship and is now head of Starfleet Medical. He is pining, but he begins to pine even more when he is informed that she was on a covert mission to the planet Kevratas, a world on the rim of the Romulan empire, and that she is missing in action. She was there to find a cure for the disease running rampant through the population there. Starfleet wants Picard to lead another mission there, with a doctor from his old ship, the Stargazer. A doctor who is now in a penal colony for trying to kill Picard and other former Stargazer officers. Recruiting his old security officer to help them, along with a Romulan dissident, they go to Kevratas to find a cure, while Picard plans the search for the woman he loves, the woman he is certain is still alive. Meanwhile, Romulan politics intervene, which could mean the deaths of them all.
Death in Winter is not a very filling book. With small pages and large type, it looks bigger than it is. I raced through it in two days, partially because I wanted to know what happened, and partially because there wasn't a lot of substance to it. It deals almost exclusively with Picard and Crusher, as well as with the Romulan political situation. Unfortunately, those having read the books in publication order already know how the political problems have turned out, as we are told what happened in both Articles of the Federation and, more importantly, in Titan: Taking Wing. We just didn't know the details.
In fact, this is one of the problems. I don't mind the limited characters, but in an attempt to shoe everybody in, Worf and Geordi are also featured attempting to find out where Picard went, as they find out about Beverly's disappearance and think that they should go help. Worf even has a dream showing that if he doesn't go help Picard find her, she'll die. Ultimately, nothing happens. What was the point of this again? Talk about your dead-end subplots! It just seemed like filler in an already thin plot.
Also thin is the Doctor Greyhorse plot. A lot of tension is created with the fact that he could very well be insane, despite what his doctors have told Picard and Starfleet. He starts acting kind of weird, saying some odd things, making Picard wonder if he's going to jeopardize the mission. Then, not surprisingly, nothing happens with it. He does what he's set out to do, acting a bit more strangely but nothing too major, and the thread is dropped. I know I'm repeating myself, but what was the point of this again? Sure, it adds a bit of characterization to Greyhorse, but considering we barely hear from him anyway, it all seems superfluous.
Friedman's characterization is pretty good, though. I'm glad he finally deals with the Picard/Crusher relationship, in a way I heartily approve (and the excerpt from next summer's Resistance shows that it even continues!). Crusher's reaction to Picard's whispered statement to her near the end is understandable, despite the fact that she'd been realizing some things about him too during her captivity. He blindsides her a bit, and she needs some time to come to terms with it. The ending is a bit predictable because of that, but it was still nice to see. Picard and Crusher are captured wonderfully, both in their outward characterization as well as internal monologues. Worf and Geordi, despite being extraneous to the plot, are also done well, even without using stereotypical mannerisms from the series. The Romulan characters are extremely fun, making the political plot interesting despite already knowing the outcome. We do find out a bit more information about the Romulan commander Donatra, adding more colour to her portrayal in the previous books, such as why she was so fiercely loyal to Admiral Braeg.
What's missing is the Stargazer crew. Both Greyhorse and "Pug" Joseph depend mostly on what is known from previous books. I've already stated that the Greyhorse conflict is over before it begins, but I also get no real sense for why Joseph was so loyal to Picard and why Picard depends on him so much. Friedman tells us a lot about them, and there are a couple of nice scenes between them, but it just felt like most of the "showing" of why they're such good friends appeared in the other books. Those of us who haven't read the Stargazer books are left out in the Kevratan cold.
Overall, Death in Winter is an enjoyable book, despite the missteps above. It sparkles when either the Romulans are on screen or the Picard/Crusher relationship is being dealt with. Some of the passages in the middle drag, but when the action starts, Friedman does a good job with that too. I wanted the first post-Nemesis book to be a home run, but instead it's a single. The good points and bad points almost even out. Hopefully, Resistance will be that home run.
David Roy
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Friedman breathes life into Star Trek once again..., 2 Nov 2006
By 
Fantasy Lore - See all my reviews
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What Star Trek fan wouldn't be lured into the icy embrace of `Death in winter'?! That's my first question. But for those of you like myself who can't possibly resist the urge and plunge themselves unthinkingly into that ice-cold embrace...is it any good? That's my second question and the answer is yes, it is quite good. Unfortunately it isn't the outstanding story I was hoping for, but that's beside the point, because this is still `Star Trek: The Next Generation'- a generation I grew up watching and whose characters are as clear to me as the members of my own family. And one which I'm pleased to say has been very faithfully rejuvenated here by experienced Star Trek writer Michael Jan Friedman.

For me, the characterisation was perfect throughout, no exceptions and it was an absolute pleasure to be in the company of analytical, compassionate Crusher and strong but reserved Picard once again after so long a time devoid of their company. The love affair between these two has of course been a very long time in the making and my insides jumped with recognition and nostalgia each time Friedman would reference one of the television episodes that focused on their tentative relationship, as a way to clarify their feelings and emphasise this passion that has lain dormant and unspoken for so many years between them.

To be perfectly honest this is a bit of a lacklustre story, albeit one that's exquisitely phrased and grippingly written. But unfortunately there just isn't enough original material to elevate it above the more run-of-the-mill Star Trek novel, which touchs all the bases, but somehow doesn't add up to a greater whole. I was also slightly disappointed by the Romulan political sub-plot that ran parallel to the Picard-Crusher story-line; some small loose ends left at the end just niggled at me slightly. But if I vehemently object to anything in this story it's the omission of B-4. No mention is made of him whatsoever. Even if Friedman had felt he was extraneous to the story and would only have hindered the journeys of the main characters, he could have at least made a passing reference to him. Well that's my view anyway. But that was the only continuity error that I picked up on and I guess it's not that big of a deal.

It's an expensive novel and it falls short of the great Star Trek stories, but it comes to us from a master-storyteller, it breathes life into beloved characters sorely missed and it's beautifully presented. Worth buying.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but still disappointing.., 18 Feb 2006
By A Customer
I won't go into an synopsis of this story as it has been done, much better than I could do, in previous reviews. Just my humble opinion. This is the book fans have been waiting for, the Crusher/Picard story and maybe after this long wait anything would be a little disappointing.
My main problem was Picard's characterisation. His words and actions seemed off throughout the entire story, I kept thinking, Picard wouldn't do/say that. In particular I remember that he fequently used the word 'grand'. Only a slight thing but I'm sensitive to it because as an Irish person living abroad, everyone jokes about my constant use of the word (anyone with Irish friends will know what I mean) and I can't recall that it was a phrase Picard ever used much. There were lots of little details like this which put me off the book rather than the main story.
I can forgive other Trek authors for this, Peter David for example makes characters do/say the unexpected for comic effect, but this is an important story and will have ramifications in the following books. It's not right!!
On the other hand Crusher was well written, could easily 'see' her character as I read.
Another annoyance was the Worf/Geordi storyline. Worf and Geordi did some plotting and nothing came of it. At all. Nothing. I wondered often if I had missed something but since the book is so short (for a hefty hardback price) it would have been difficult to miss anything.
Fortunately I had read the old TNG book Reunion so I knew some of the backstory with Picards old Stargazer shipmates but I find it unusual how a reader would have to have read this or perhaps the stargazer books to be fully in tune with the story. With all the post series books, there is now a continuity that was never there before in star trek books that gives a feeling of a clean slate, also many readers may only be reading from where the series left off so having expected them to have read other, seemingly unrelated books (initially) is irritating. Surely the book could have been planned to let Worf and Geordie take these more important roles, something all readers would have appriciated instead of characters that only a handful would care about?
Despite all this...it's not a terrible book. Every TNG fan has been waiting for it and it delievers. Not in the best possible way but not in the very worst either. And it has Sela. The Romulans were written well and I enjoyed all the scenes with them. And even a grumbler like me had to smile at the end.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Icy cold weather forecast, 19 April 2007
By 
Janne Lauridsen "Gubbie" (Aalborg, Denmark) - See all my reviews
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Is this book any good? That is the question everyone asks when they are about to buy a new book, and if you had asked me I would have said yes, the book is good. So why not give it five stars you might wonder.

Though the story has potential is has a problem, loose ends.

Crusher is sent to a world of ice and snow to save a specie being plauged with a sickness that is killing them, just one problem, the planet is within the Romulan empire, she goes, and get captures, so the federations sends a new party that firstly have to come up with a cure and secondly have to save Crusher. Picard is going, mostly to save Crusher.

Now if the story just stuck to that, but it doesn't, we are being thrown to and from the planet where Picard and his team is on a secret mission, and Enterpriser where Worf and Georgi is trying to find out where they'd gone and planing a rescuing mission. Out of no where Janeway shows up to be mentioned in ten lines no more.

I am left with a feeling of why that was nessesary, what was the use of that, since the rescue doesn't make much of anything in the story, and why mention Janeway at all? She does nothing, it seems like Friedman just want to mention her for fun....

He would have been better off leaving Enterprise where it was, and stuck with the story on the planet where Picard's nemisis Sela is.

This sadly cost two stars in my book.

The good thing is, we finally see some development in the whole relationship between Picard and Crusher.

What is it with star trek novel that just have to rush the endings, and make relationships seem misplaced?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good as usual, 19 Nov 2005
I thought this was a Great book, Picard meets up with old shipmates for one more adventure. But when are we going to get to new adventures with the Enterprise, shes been in drydock too long and some of the characters appeared like they had been forgotten about and just tacked on at different points in the book. Those are the only bad points because I would recommend this book to any reader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lacklustre, will not leave a lasting impression, 31 May 2009
By 
Mr. I. Ogilvie "Mr O" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Flat, pedestrian storyline, as other reviews have pointed out, this is primarily a Picard and Crusher book.

The characterization of Crusher in my opinion is good, the background nicely positioned. One of the few characters who actually drives her plotline. The characterization of Picard is a bit off - as seems to be the case with most post-Nemesis books, a passenger in his own storyline.

After Crusher and Picard many of the characters really just seem to make up the numbers: Pug Joseph, Greyhorse, Geordi, Worf all just seemingly along for the ride with little character development or points of interest. As other reviewers have mentioned there are a number of subplots that just do not go anywhere. There is a lack of a truly threatening antagonist here, yes we have Sela but the stakes are just not raised high enough here for it to be truly gripping.

Personally I like Romulan Stories (TNG - Unification, Enterprise-Kobyashi Maru etc) and the political intrigue is interesting here, with obvious connections to Nemesis (Donatra etc). The opening of the book recounting how Picards DNA was captured to create Shinzon is described well - simultaneously teeing up Picard-Crushers relationship by providing some historical context. So the book starts promisingly. The book also concludes well: the last 50 pages are entertaining with another Romulan coup attempted and the conclusion to the Picard - Crusher Will they, Won't they nicely handled. When I got to the end of the book, I looked at the size of the paperback and wondered to myself what had happened in between.

The storyline is not really driven by the characters, their choices, ingenuity or teamwork as perhaps the finest trek stories are. I'm thinking The McCoy, Kirk, Spock triumvirate or original crew of The Next Generation. Once you remove Riker, Troi, Data from this, what are you left with? Picard, LaForge, Worf and Crusher? Indeed if "Resistance" is anything to go by we are in dire need of a Picard Renaissance/Rebirth of the type Kirk underwent in the Wrath of Khan.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A chilly beginning, 12 July 2009
Death in Winter kicked off the adventures of the Enterprise-E crew after the events of the film Nemesis. A couple of years later the adventures continued in some rather more interesting books such as Q&A, Before Dishonor and Greater than the Sum. This book though seemed like an exercise in filling time.

The book takes place while the Enterprise is in spacedock following the battle in Nemesis and it's primary purpose is to finally get Picard and Crusher together, which it does, hurrah! The book is therefore very much focused on those two characters, with what's left of the established TNG cast (Worf and Geordi, as the rest have moved to Titan or died) getting a forgettable side-story that ties into the main events of the book.

The story is set on a Romulan occupied world, allowing Sela to return as a bad-gal. It also features appearances from some of the former crew of the USS Stargazer, as established in Friedman's previous Stargazer books. Personally I found the Stargazer characters an annoying distraction; Not being familiar with them, having not read any of the Stargazer series, I didn't relate to them at all, and I don't think Mr Friedman did much of a job establishing them as stand-alone guest characters for this tale. The story in this book wasn't hugely captivating, nor does it really establish a great deal of back-story to any of the books set after it. The novel came off to me as something of a filler, easily missable and not very interesting.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 28 Dec 2005
This book is a must to read if you like the path of "The Next Generation" TV show. This book brings Picards past crew of the "Stargazer" back for another mission which i found quite interesting. This is more a romantic story but still has the theme of Star Trek and charactors from the TV show that we have all come to enjoy. The only downside to this book is the write out of the other main charactors (what happened to B-4? and also the other charactors like Worf and geordi get little time in the book). I personally liked the book because of the plot in the story. I do hope the "Enterprise E" gets back underway out of drydock and i can continue reading new books on the next adventures of the enterprise.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good start after the events in Nemesis, 29 Jan 2014
By 
N. Shearer "Neil" (Otley, Leeds UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Death in Winter: Star Trek: The Next Generation (Kindle Edition)
Knowing there would be no more Next Generation movies made me feel empty. Sure I like the new JJ movies but I still miss the trek I grew up with. This is a good entry in life after Nemesis. Glad to see the doctor getting more attention that in the movies. Had this been a tv episode it would make a great 2 parter but somehow lacked something I just can't put my finger on. However this being the first trek novel I have read it has certainly refilled my thirst for more in the next generation saga. I will certainly be buying the next few books.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Yes, thats it exactly., 20 July 2013
By 
Dan Brierley "Dan" (At home, where do you think.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Death in Winter: Star Trek: The Next Generation (Kindle Edition)
It IS okay. I consider it to be like the TNG episode FAMILY, straight after the borg episode. Its really good, but dont feel left out if you dont read it. Good for continuation, or filling your lunch times.
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