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20
3.7 out of 5 stars
The Ripper Code
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:£2.48
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 29 July 2009
This is a good, rational, non-sensationalist case for a new Ripper suspect. The evidence against him is all very circumstantial, though, and in fact it occurs to me that the author missed the most interesting clue of all. When better quality pictures of Mary Kelly's death scene were printed, people noticed that what appear to be the initials FM daubed on the wall behind her bed. When James Maybrick was named as a suspect because of the dodgy "Ripper Diary", some assumed that these initals related to Florence Maybrick. But Thoughill's prime suspect is called Frank Miles!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 8 February 2010
Having read and been pretty well convinced by Dan Farson's book naming Druitt as Jack the Ripper, I was a little reluctant to read yet another "final solution" book. How wrong I was. Having now read The Ripper Code in almost one sitting, apart from stopping to eat and sleep, I feel that, even if final proof can never be found, the cluster of clues the author has highlighted provide a convincing new suspect, whilst explaining Druitt's involvement in previous histories.

For anyone interested in Jack, and who isn't, this is well worth reading.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 26 March 2013
A very thought provoking insight into who the ripper may have been great evidence sought out but will we ever really know who Jack the ripper really was . It really made me think that this author could be right .
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I have to agree with "Polstar" here. This book began promisingly with each murder described in great detail in an easy to read format. Where the book spectacularly flops for me is where the author starts presenting his theory. Whilst I accept that all "solutions" to the Ripper case will only ever be theories, this one does nothing to convince me. The author frequently uses the term "and so it follows that x = y". No - I'm afraid it doesn't just "follow". I feel the assumptions are a bit too far fetched, and some of them are just plain silly.

For me, the FBI criminal profilers have made the best attempt at identifying the Ripper by profiling the type of man he was, his likely employment and where he was likely to live. The reason it's the best guess? Because the profilers never attempted to pinpoint a specific suspect because it simply can't be done. They use logic, reason and tried & tested profiling - all of which points to a man who lived amongst the women he killed. Perhaps a man no one took any notice of.

It may be more exciting and movie-like to imagine a privileged man waging horrific murder in a poverty stricken area, but naah - it just doesn't cut it for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 March 2013
This book closely analyses the circumstances and characters involved in the killings as well as drawing on previously , to me anyway , unknown connections. I do not know whether his conclusion is correct or not but I found his theories and arguments very plausible.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 17 November 2011
This book is a must for all ripperologists. It does not seek to convince the reader that the theory is correct or to solve the case in any way. It is merely presented as a possibility with relevant information to support suggestions made. I loved it and have since written a psychological analysis of the the main suspect as I currently study psychology. Toughill's research was validated by my own enquiries into the psyche of the main suspect. If you only ever read one Jack the Ripper book then make it this one. Fantastic!
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 15 April 2008
I think this book will spin the Ripper world on it's head.

A highly recommended read for anyone interested in Jack the Ripper and his mysterious identity.
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on 5 April 2013
Lots of interesting questions asked here by Toughill in an engaging manner. Definitely worth a read if you are interested in history and the Ripper murders. Shame there are no images in this Kindle edition.
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on 29 August 2013
An interesting read; the author has clearly researched meticulously to support his arguments and they are clearly laid out (whether I'm completely convinced or not.......)
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on 25 April 2013
A good read but only rehashes much of what's gone before. Toughill's theories rely on a lot of circumstantial evidence and guesses.
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