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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zest for Life
Action-based happiness is a marvellous concept. With a superb array of stories, anecdotes, quotes, experiences, definitions, recommendations, tips, Liggy shows that happiness is something we have control on. We spend indeed an inordinate effort making ourselves unhappy. Next time we are paid a compliment, instead of politely declining it as our parents taught us to do,...
Published 20 months ago by Patrice Lasserre

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reiterating common sense
Nothing wrong with reiterating common sense and that catalyst may be sufficient for many to address some basic ways to mitigate unhappiness e.g. Avoid negative thoughts. Full marks however for recognising that depression is a medical condition and may require professional help beyond what a self help book can achieve.

It should always be stressed that there is...
Published 18 months ago by Cheshire Cat


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zest for Life, 27 Nov 2012
Action-based happiness is a marvellous concept. With a superb array of stories, anecdotes, quotes, experiences, definitions, recommendations, tips, Liggy shows that happiness is something we have control on. We spend indeed an inordinate effort making ourselves unhappy. Next time we are paid a compliment, instead of politely declining it as our parents taught us to do, why not acknowledge it, relish it, roll ourselves into it? In the patchwork of our lives, a small grey square will become vividly coloured; a bit like the transformation of Pleasantville. Splendid!
My favourite chapter is Bounce Ability. Many authors write about resilience but this is the first time I read about bounce ability; something that really speaks to me. As my years passed by, I never had a difficulty with resilience but I had a strong feeling that I was not bouncing as high as I used to. And it was not improving. It is probably just an impression; I certainly can bounce over that wall that looked far too high.
I like the way the book is written; it packs a lot in 200 pages. I like the great optimism that does not forget reality. The format is also convenient to refer back to a specific subject. How to be Happy could actually be a handbook for Zest for Life.
What is the chapter that you love most?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Happiness is ..., 24 Jan 2013
By 
Ladybubbles (Croydon, Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
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How to Be Happy as a self-help book is not unique in the advice it gives, however, this book is far more than that and from page 1, reading it is like a breath of fresh air.

The subject matter in itself is intriguing, as happiness is not easy to define unlike, wealth, health or material success. Most people when asked what happiness is have no idea and it is a subject that has exercised the minds of philosophers over the ages. The answer is not all that clear but has a lot to do with having a balanced approach to life.

The author reflects and considers just how people's emotional well-being is affected on a daily basis by outside factors such as work, relationships, life, love, drama and trauma. The book gives useful tools and helpful hints on how to deal with what everyday life throws at you.

This is may not be the answer to all your problems but gives food for thought and consideration to strategies that may improve your all round well-being and therefore improve your chance at being happy. Definitely worth reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reiterating common sense, 15 Jan 2013
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Cheshire Cat (Warrington, Cheshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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Nothing wrong with reiterating common sense and that catalyst may be sufficient for many to address some basic ways to mitigate unhappiness e.g. Avoid negative thoughts. Full marks however for recognising that depression is a medical condition and may require professional help beyond what a self help book can achieve.

It should always be stressed that there is no shame in seeking professional help but this book may, for less complex conditions, be sufficient to assist the reader improve their mental outlook.

A means of being happy? No, not in a read of a coupleofhpurs but it is easy to read, contains nothing earth shattering but a useful restating of some simple ways to reduce those negative thoughts.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars worthwhile book, 14 Nov 2012
By 
Don Panik (Cambridge UK) - See all my reviews
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This is an ok book in my estimation. Much of it seems pretty obvious, but then it's the application not the assessment that is often the hard part. Boils down to:

- Don't get stuck in negative thinking
- Get out and take some regular exercise
- Aim for balance in your life
- Do things for others
- Depression is an illness

If you are desperately unhappy you probably need professional help. If you just want to get a bit more happiness into your life you will find this quite stimulating.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Unexpected Joy, 5 Nov 2012
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I came across this book unexpectedly. I have been fortunate enough to never suffer from depression. I grew up in a supportive & loving environment & have always considered myself to be blessed with a happy nature. So I was not expecting to find so much of value and interest in this wonderful book.

If, like me, you are leaving the relatively carefree days of your youth behind, no doubt you will find middle & later life brings with it far more complex issues that need to be faced, like illness, bereavement etc.

This book is easy to read and well structured into 12 interesting & far reaching chapters, each of which begins with an amusing story. It is full of good ideas & great quotes ranging from Aristotle to Tolstoy and beyond. It has plenty of humourous & uplifting anecdotes and is engaging and enlightening. It shares Webb's own personal experiences, including tales from her work with the UN, travelling to places like Afghanistan & Ethiopia, along with the wisdom of others & plenty of positive psychology.

I found this book to be a timely & realistic reminder of all the basics that add up to the heart of what we are ultimately striving for - a happy and meaningful life.

Buy it and enjoy it yourself before passing it on to someone you care about. It's also great for angst ridden teenagers, struggling to be at ease with themselves in the fast paced, consumer led society we live in.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How to be Happy: Step One, 9 May 2013
By 
zombielover "perpetual student" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Put down the book, turn off the internet, go outside and take in a deep lungful of reality.

I lost patience a long time ago in self-help books of such unequivocally ridiculous cheerfulness. I have no problems with literature that you can use as a reference through difficult stages of your life, but this work (I hesitate to call it tome) is overly-cheerful, riddled with cliche and, to be honest, a solid spoon of common sense would suffice.

Jack Dee I'm not, but my thinly-reigned vitriol and sarcasm was fully unleashed at what I saw leafing from page to page. Save yourself some money, if you're this unhappy you're not going to find enlightenment from a book; see a proper counsellor and work through your issues with a human being.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Basic General Information, 5 Dec 2012
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I liked this book in that it gave a lot of general information that anyone who has done a lot of personal development would have already come across before but for me it didn't really offer any new great insights. I did like the author's writing style and found it an easy book to read and digest. Not a bad book to dip into.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars helpful and simple, 14 Nov 2012
By 
E. Ramshaw - See all my reviews
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im not normally one for self help books as they tend to be full of unhelpful silly phrases and sayings which only tend to talk down to the reader but this book caught me on an off day so i ordered it hopeful of some ideas.
i have to say for the most part its a good and helpful book , yes it has quotes and sayings that claim to help you feel positive which i dont feel add anything, they simply make you think for a few mins but you forget them as quick as youve thought about them but what this book did do was allow me to see where sometimes i and in fact all of us go wrong in what we expect from the world and from others around us.the bulk of the book is more than engaging and i only skipped a few small parts which held no interest personally to me but i did actually read the book all in one afternoon as i couldnt put it down. ive learnt a fair amount about myself and others i spend time with and am hopful it will help me to make some changes. i have also passed it to my teen daughter and she has already said it makes vaild points to her so fingers crossed some happier people.
all in all not a bad self help book
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worthwhile Read for Just About Anyone, 7 Nov 2012
By 
Brett H "pentangle" (Brighton) - See all my reviews
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I have read a lot of self help books over the years - I think it is fair to categorise How to Be Happy as a self help book. I must confess to being something of a cynic where they are concerned. So often they are restating the obvious, going over old ground, or just beating out one or a very few points at length. However, this book is far more than that and from page 1, reading it is like a breath of fresh air.

The subject is intriguing. It is not nearly so easy to define happiness as, for example, wealth, health or material success. The author starts off by considering what exactly it is, which is a subject which has exercised the minds of philosophers over the ages. The answer is not all that clear, but has nothing to do with the pursuit of material goods and a lot to do with having a balanced approach to life.

The author goes on to consider various factors which may contribute to the happiness of the individual. These are, for example, De-stress, Managing Change, Positive Relationships and Life Balance. It is easy to see that if we do not get these areas in balance, they are likely to inhibit our search for happiness. The presentation is very clear, the message is split down into bite sized chunks, and the key points are reiterated at the end of each chapter. There are also some nice thought provoking examples along the way.

I thought the content was very comprehensive and there was plenty of food for thought. This is not a book which ends with a series of conclusions. It is more a detailed consideration of strategies to improve mental and physical well being and hence improve one's chance of being happy. The author herself has suffered the occasional bout of depression and has clearly made an in depth study of the subject. This is a worthwhile read for just about anyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good book if you are inn the right mood, 30 Oct 2012
I have read this book and met Liggy at one of her workshops.

I liked this book. It's a very accessible with short chapters allowing you to dip in and out and just select the area you want to focus on or think about. Each chapter focusses on an area of happiness and generally they have some helpful advice or an exercise that supports the proposition.

A word of caution. It's not heavyweight; this isn't neuroscience or a treatise on advanced psychology. I also would suggest that you probably have to be open to the idea of being happy to enjoy it. I got the book on the back of attending a workshop and it was a very good way to take the learning out of classroom and into real life. I am pretty confident that the book stands up on its own without the workshop and is an easy primer for anyone looking to up their happiness quotient.
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