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4.4 out of 5 stars
Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968]
Format: Blu-rayChange
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2013
I have both the Anchor Bay DVD and the new Blu Ray release, I have always thought the original effects let an otherwise brilliant film down. So the guys who re-mastered this edition have done a brilliant job, they have not ruined the film at all, total rubbish, they have enhanced it, if you watch the making of its only in small bits, blue flames behind the Angel of Death, when there was just a blue screen(as originally Hammer did not have the budget or/and time to do the effect), the Spider which always looked rubbish, its still there(no CG spider), just colour corrected and darkened so now it looks grounded and in the room, instead of a stupid super imposed spider. They also got a 4k print of it, did all the remastering of it on this, then took it down to Blu Ray resolution. Get this disc dont listen to the nay sayers, brilliant quality.

cheers
Dave
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2009
One of Terrence Fisher's greatest directorial efforts certainly is this stylish, witty and thrilling adaptation of a Dennis Wheatley novel. Richard Matheson did the screenwriting and like most of what he touches, it turns to gold. This film also has a wonderful score throughout, some superior set pieces and some decent looking special effects for its day (O.K. so maybe some of it does look cheesy and laughable). This film sets itself apart from most of the rest of Christopher Lee's career as, for a change, he plays the good guy!. In fact, he does a rather good job and the character, although a hero definitely suits his persona. Lee's character is a pronounced expert on the occult and Lee does a great job in portraying him. This was probably one of Hammer's lesser known efforts, however The Devil Rides Out is one of the strongest Satanist films in a subgenre that's usually known for powerful films. Unlike a lot of Hammer's efforts, there are no gothic monsters to be seen or unfortunately period sets and costumes. The story centers around a group of three friends meeting after sometime and finding that one of them has been taken in by a Satanic cult, and is soon to be "re-baptized" into the unholy order. The forces of good face everything from old Scratch himself to a giant spider to the Angel of Death, not to mention Mocata and his league of followers. Christopher Lee gets in a rare turn as a protagonist facing Charles Gray's sinister Mocata, a "high priest" in Satan's service. He brings all the manner and imposing stature of his Dracula character to this role and the result is one of the best hero characters in Hammer's vaunted history. The Devil Rides Out is a fantastic film and definitely one of my favorites that has been overshadowed by Hammer's more famous films. I do suggest you seek it out though, if for nothing other than to see Lee as a good guy.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 October 2014
I've always liked this film from seeing it as a kid. However, even then I remember being unimpressed with some of the special effects. The Goat of Mendez sequence is excellent but the whole Angel of Death sequence later on was quite poor. What a surprise then to see the enhancements to the effects in mainly that latter part of the film. I've read here that some don't like the changes but they are very subtle and there's no replacing of original effectw with cgi as some suggest. Well, okay, they have replaced one shot of lightning that looked like it was just scratched onto the film with CG lightning but I'm fine with that.There are a couple of matte shots that now don't wobble about as they weren't registered correctly originally. The close up of the Angel of Death revealing his face now has a background rather than just plain blue and the spider, at last, looks like it actually belongs in the scene and isn't bright red any more. Personally I see nothing wrong with these enhancements. As i say, they are only subtle changes and I suspect most viewers who haven't seen the film in a while probably wouldn't even notice.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 24 August 2013
Even with some poor special effects (Mainly the Spider that keeps changing size) TDRO is without a doubt the best HH film ever made - I love Horror and am fond of many Hammer films mainly in a nostalgic way but not with TDRO - It totally stands up on it's own - This film fits comfortably into the top ten greatest British horror films of all time and doesn't look out of place among the best horror films ever - Along with "The Wicker Man" this is Christopher Lee's finest hour - This film is full of surprise most other formulaic Hammer films lack - TDRO is a masterpiece -
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 10 October 2013
The Devil Rides out, (1968), is perhaps the most remembered and famous film from Hammer Horror. It's the one that terrified audiences when first released and was in grained on the mind.

Though I hate the word dated, I do feel that much of that terror has been long lost. Don't get me wrong there are still some wonderful scenes. The spirit appearing with his eyes near the beginning and the devil himself- are done very well.

Compared to other horrors and Hammer features I was slightly let down by the film. Every character apart from Lee and Gray are wafer thin and the story fails to draw the viewer in, you really must make the effort.

I would not recommened this to someone just coming into Hammer films, as it may put them off. Despite all of this I did find the film enjoyable, but perhaps the hype over the years is not entirely justified. The film lives off of some wonderful scenes, but as a whole it could have been better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 21 February 2015
In 1968 Satanism was a prickly subject so it took some daring for Hammer to bring The Devil Rides Out to the big screen. The reason this movie is so good is the excellent script by Richard Matheson who sticks rigidly to Wheatley's book, stiff upper lip and all, allowing the plot to excite and thrill as it leads to a thrilling climax. The let-downs - as agreed by everyone - are the dreadful special effects which are so central to the theme and are laughable. Lee excels as the Duc de Richlieu - perhaps one of the best performances of his career - and Gray revels in the part of master satanist Mocata. The music score also jars and is intrusive. Despite the misgivings over the giant spider, the Goat of Mendes and the reverse play of the angel of death, I'd give this four stars for the effort alone. It's a pity Hammer messed up To The Devil A Daughter so badly, leading to the premature demise of other Wheatley interpretations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 February 2015
Hammer Films are well known for Frankenstein, Dracula, and the Mummy movies, and they are all great, but in 1968 hammer adapted Dennis Wheatleys book The Devil Rides Out. . the story is set in 1929. Christopher Lee plays the Duc De Richleau, when de richelieu and his friend Rex, played by Leon Greene,dubbed by Patrick Allen, visit their friends son Simon played by a young Patrick Mower, they both suspect some thing is wrong. this then leads to finding that simon is under the power of the mysterious Mocata, played by Charles Gray. i still find this film still holds up today every time i watch it. it also makes a change to see Christopher Lee not playing the main villian. the film is in 1.66.1 aspect, 1080p, extras on the blu ray,three new documentaries, the world of hammer episode hammer,gallery. much has been said about the new ggi added, but it does not take away for me.that its still a good film to watch.
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on 31 August 2007
Of all the British horror films it`s "The Wicker Man" that tends to get all the plaudits, but for my money The Wicker Man has no sense of fun with it unlike this. I remember first seeing this on late night TV all those years ago & thinking "Wow what a movie". Having spoken to many people over the years whenever we talk about horror films this is allways mentioned. This is beyond any doubt one of the most underated British horror movies ever. If your new to Hammer or you`ve never seen this film & your reading all these reviews you should now be thinking is this really that good ? Well actually yes it is. The use of music is outstanding in helping to set the atmosphere, the special Fx are`nt as naff as they usually are in Hammer films, the acting by everybody is 1st class, the screen play is perfectly ballanced between horror & adventure, the edititng is spot on & set at a good pace, and to cap it all it`s actually a bloody good story ! i mean what more could you want. Put this on when you & your mates get back from the pub, there`ll love you forever if you do !

A true British classic, worth every penny even Christopher Lee rates this as one of his best film moments. What better recommendation than that can you have ? Highly Recommended go buy !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Notable for its casting of the great Christopher Lee in a rare `good-guy' role, this Hammer release from the late Sixties is clearly dated but as an example of the genre it remains great fun. With Charles Gray (if ever a man was born to play a cult leader it was him) as chief villain, Patrick Mower as a gullible acolyte sucked in to Gray's devil-worshipping sect, Lee as urbane Duke de Richelieu - determined to rescue his friend from the clutches of the sinister chicken-sacrificers, and Leon Greene as the Duke's mucker Rex Van Ryn, this is a decent stab at filming Dennis Wheatley's atmospheric novel; albeit a pretty clumsily edited one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2015
Blu ray version: An excellent restoration for an excellent horror film, perhaps Hammer's finest hour. The original film colour tones have been faithfully reproduced adding that unique 60s feel to the film. Despite what some critics say, I found the 're-touched' scene when the angel of Death arrives to be tastefully executed. To me this improved the film, although it would have been better had new Hammer given viewers the option of 'original or new SFX' as Paramount have done in the Star Trek original series. Nonetheless this is an excellent film and restoration which richly deserves a five star rating.
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