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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Devil Rides Out Blu-Ray review
I have both the Anchor Bay DVD and the new Blu Ray release, I have always thought the original effects let an otherwise brilliant film down. So the guys who re-mastered this edition have done a brilliant job, they have not ruined the film at all, total rubbish, they have enhanced it, if you watch the making of its only in small bits, blue flames behind the Angel of Death,...
Published 9 months ago by Mr. D. Price

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43 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the original film
For some baffling reason the producers of this edition have chosen to add special effects to various sequences including light beams, a wall of blue flames, lighting bolts... in an effort to modernize the films appearance. I loathe such tampering, but wouldn't care if they included the original version as well (they aren't). I'll retract this review if they do, if not, I...
Published 23 months ago by Timothy Ramzyk


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Devil Rides Out Blu-Ray review, 2 Nov 2013
By 
Mr. D. Price - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968] (Blu-ray)
I have both the Anchor Bay DVD and the new Blu Ray release, I have always thought the original effects let an otherwise brilliant film down. So the guys who re-mastered this edition have done a brilliant job, they have not ruined the film at all, total rubbish, they have enhanced it, if you watch the making of its only in small bits, blue flames behind the Angel of Death, when there was just a blue screen(as originally Hammer did not have the budget or/and time to do the effect), the Spider which always looked rubbish, its still there(no CG spider), just colour corrected and darkened so now it looks grounded and in the room, instead of a stupid super imposed spider. They also got a 4k print of it, did all the remastering of it on this, then took it down to Blu Ray resolution. Get this disc dont listen to the nay sayers, brilliant quality.

cheers
Dave
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best adaption of a Wheatley book, 24 Mar 2013
This review is from: Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968] (Blu-ray)
Christopher Lee sites this as one of his best films amd you can.certainly see why.It also asks the question.why he didnt play the hero as often as he is a tremendous presence in the role.Why on eart they didnt give him the Verney role in To the Devil a Daughter though he was tremendous as the follower of Astroth.The plot demonstrates excellent narrative and is compelling probably due to the faithful adaption by Matheson of I am Legend Shrinking Man fame.Terrence.Fischer proves again he is Hammers most cosistent Director.Whatever version you choose the original are the one with cgi this is a plot and acting driven film.and you will.thoroughly.enjoy it
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Hammer Classic, 31 Aug 2007
Of all the British horror films it`s "The Wicker Man" that tends to get all the plaudits, but for my money The Wicker Man has no sense of fun with it unlike this. I remember first seeing this on late night TV all those years ago & thinking "Wow what a movie". Having spoken to many people over the years whenever we talk about horror films this is allways mentioned. This is beyond any doubt one of the most underated British horror movies ever. If your new to Hammer or you`ve never seen this film & your reading all these reviews you should now be thinking is this really that good ? Well actually yes it is. The use of music is outstanding in helping to set the atmosphere, the special Fx are`nt as naff as they usually are in Hammer films, the acting by everybody is 1st class, the screen play is perfectly ballanced between horror & adventure, the edititng is spot on & set at a good pace, and to cap it all it`s actually a bloody good story ! i mean what more could you want. Put this on when you & your mates get back from the pub, there`ll love you forever if you do !

A true British classic, worth every penny even Christopher Lee rates this as one of his best film moments. What better recommendation than that can you have ? Highly Recommended go buy !
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scarcely in the name of God..., 16 July 2007
By 
Matthew Mercy (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
Probably the greatest horror movie of Christopher Lee's long career, the 1967 Hammer adaptation of Dennis Wheatley's The Devil Rides Out is one of the most overlooked and underrated films in British cinema. Along with Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969), it was one of the last really first-rate movies the company produced, and features all of the Hammer personnel working at the top of their game. Alongside Lee, in what might be his very finest movie performance as the stern aristocrat who finds himself battling a terrifying supernatural evil, the film notably showcases Diamonds Are Forever's Blofeld, Charles Gray, in an excellent, award-worthy turn as a master of black magic.
Effortlessly streamlining Wheatley's sprawling novel, I Am Legend author Richard Matheson contributes an excellent script, enabling director Terence Fisher to deliver one of his paciest, most exciting horror flicks, which is further enhanced by possibly James Bernard's finest ever score. A couple of dodgy special effects aside, the film is a literate, thrilling adventure into the occult, and one of Fisher's greatest triumphs. A must-see, despite being another Hammer movie released onto DVD utterly devoid of extras.
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43 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the original film, 29 Sep 2012
By 
Timothy Ramzyk (Milwaukee, WI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968] (Blu-ray)
For some baffling reason the producers of this edition have chosen to add special effects to various sequences including light beams, a wall of blue flames, lighting bolts... in an effort to modernize the films appearance. I loathe such tampering, but wouldn't care if they included the original version as well (they aren't). I'll retract this review if they do, if not, I suggest you add your own to the list if this practice bothers you as well.
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65 of 79 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Warning: New Non-Option Effects on Blu-Ray, 27 Sep 2012
By 
Ross Gowland (West Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968] (Blu-ray)
A word of warning: Hammer have announced that this Blu-ray will NOT contain the original theatrical version of The Devil Rides Out. Instead it will replace old special effects with new CGI scenes. These will be mandatory, with no choice of opting out.

Why the current owners of Hammer think there is a need for this, or even that they have the moral right to alter Terence Fisher's work, is beyond me. They obviously have no clue about what the fans actually want.

Someone Tweeted about wanting the original version and they were directed by Hammer to the pre-existing DVD. I too will stick with the older SD version until the film is given a proper Blu-ray release.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slick old fashioned scares, 16 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Devil Rides Out (DVD)
Based on the work of Dennis Wheatley, reknowed for his knowledge of the occult, The Devil Rides Out, is a melee of occult practises, satanism and the usual debauchery! Christopher Lee is his usual silent and menacing self, but the really scary character is played by Charles Gray (better known for his role as the narrator in The Rocky Horror Show),who dominates the film and really does leave you in no doubt that he is playing a seriously nasty character.
Film legend states that the rituals depicted in the film were based on real events...but that's movie buff gossip for you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hammer Films Best Moment, 9 May 2000
By 
10166794@scholar.nepean.uws.edu.au (australia - a long way from France) - See all my reviews
The best of Hammer Studios Dennis Wheatley adaptations, with legendary writer Richard Matheson doing a fine job making the black magic plot work on screen. The film is one of the few (though I admire them all) of Hammer's films to really retain a sence of menace, and to still have a few moments of genuine terror - even for this jaded viewer. A very fine film that basicallt deals with the battle of good and evil. Christopher Lee is very fine as the good guy, being equally matched by Charles Grey - very believable as the charming but evil Mocata. Recommended.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Devil Rides Out on Blu-Ray, 20 Jun 2002
By 
E. A. Redfearn "eredfearn2" (Middlesbrough) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Hammer scored triumphs with this fine adaption of what was probably Dennis Wheatley's finest novel of Satanism and Black Magic. Despite budget limitations and dodgy special effects upon its initial release, the Hammer production team nevertheless generated an atmospheric version highlighted by a wonderful music score. Of course, the actors did themselves proud. Christopher Lee, ably supported by Patrick Mower and Paul Eddington, performed their parts as if it had been especially written for them. Charles Gray who was famous for providing the voice for Jack Hawkins when he lost his larynx due to throat cancer, played an evil menacing Mocata with great distinction. Now, after many years, it has finally been released on Blu-Ray with remastered scenes. The colours look more vibrant, some of the effects have been updated, notably the cloud scenes above Simon Aron's house, and the arrival of the Angel of Death during the pentacle scene. The original scene had been poorly done, with a blank background showing at the moment the Angel's face is revealed. Now, added effects has enhanced this scene and it does look more effective. My only quibble is that the soundtrack is PCM Stereo which does not sound too bad to be honest. There are some interesting extras as well which Hammer fans will enjoy. There is a discussion about the actual making of the film, and how the effects were brought up to date.

I am pleased that these golden oldie classics are being re-released in the new format. Hammer fans like me will snap them up. Roll on the new releases in the New Year for Dracula (1958 version) is expected to be one of them. Now, that will be worth waiting for.
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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric morality tale transcends lousy SFX, 22 Dec 2002
By A Customer
Still a class act after all these years, and absolutely ripe for a sympathetic remake. Tim Burton maybe?
Its a shame that more of Wheatley's work isn't filmed. Its now considered bombastic and politically incorrect by self-appointed style-arbitrators and their baah-ing followers. But Wheatley knew his occultism, having hung out with illuminaries such as Aleister Crowley, Montague Summers and Rollo Amad. He excelled at telling rousing tales in which drama and pace are never sacrificed to cod-psychology or boring character motivation - the Jeffrey Archer of his day. Providing a heady mix of sex, violence and graphically described Satanic rituals and orgies, his work still resonates in the collective unconscious.
Chris Lee is perfect as the aristocratic Duc de Richelieu, Wheatley's self-confessed alter-ego - he was instrumental in persuading Hammer to film the book. But this movie is owned incontestably by Charles Gray as the Crowley-inspired Satanist Mocata - the impeccably dressed and perfectly mannered personification of urbane evil and predatory sexual menace. Gray's delivery is superb - 'I won't be back, but something will' is a killer line presented with distinction, heralding the onset of the movie's breathtaking core sequence in the pentacle.
Fisher's direction is pacy and rarely lets up, and there's a real atmosphere of dread throughout the film. The scene in the observatory has a hair-raising feel of inexplicable evil, and the appearance of the demon/incubus has a cold, creepy quality unmatched in any other movie.
The pentacle sequence is stunning and the breathtaking appearance the Angel of Death propels us into the type of mythic territory which is only now beginning to be explored by Peter Jackson in his LOTR trilogy. Lee's ritual to seal the pentacle, invoking the four Archangels, is straight out of the Golden Dawn and adds esoteric credibility.
Sure, some of the special effects are cheesy, and most of the other actors (apart from Tanith), are lacklustre. Yet the atmosphere and production values define this as Hammer at its very peak - matching The Curse of Frankenstein, Dracula and The Mummy (all Fisher movies) in intensity, visceral imagination, commited performances and striking meditations on the nature of good and evil. The whole show went downhill from here, but what a swansong.
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Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968]
Devil Rides Out (Blu-ray + DVD) [1968] by Terence Fisher (Blu-ray - 2012)
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