Customer Reviews


26 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He may be invisible, but The Invisible Man is a must-see
The Invisible Man is one of the most impressive Universal "monster" films of the 1930s, a motion picture masterpiece still as vibrant and engaging now as it was in 1933. It is also a representative of the rarest of movies - one which succeeds much better than the novel upon which it was based. Don't get me wrong - H.G. Wells was a brilliant writer, one of the two founding...
Published on 9 May 2004 by Daniel Jolley

versus
24 of 30 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "I meddled in things that man must leave alone"
Universal Studios packaged some black and white "horror" films from the 1930s and 40s under their special collection called The Legacy Collection. Reviewed here is their Invisible Man collection featuring 5 films all with the "Invisible" theme.

The Invisible Man is a classic. Featuring Claude Rains as the lead, it is a film that tells of one man's madness in...
Published on 19 Aug 2006 by Margaret A. Foster


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He may be invisible, but The Invisible Man is a must-see, 9 May 2004
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
The Invisible Man is one of the most impressive Universal "monster" films of the 1930s, a motion picture masterpiece still as vibrant and engaging now as it was in 1933. It is also a representative of the rarest of movies - one which succeeds much better than the novel upon which it was based. Don't get me wrong - H.G. Wells was a brilliant writer, one of the two founding fathers of science fiction, but The Invisible Man left me as cold as the invisible man must have felt running around naked in the bitterly cold countryside. The invisible man is thoroughly unlikable in the novel, much more so than he is here. A running time of just 71 minutes and a brilliant tour de force of a film debut by Claude Raines make Jack Griffin a fascinating albeit quite mad character who never completely turns the viewer off with his misguided antics. Of course, the sword cuts both ways. In the novel, one gets a much deeper appreciation of the pain and struggle the man faces trying to restore himself to visibility. In the movie, the transition to raving megalomaniac occurs much more quickly, with several palliative dashes of humor thrown into the mix early on.
There isn't that much to the story, really. A man wrapped in bandages and clothed in a long overcoat, glasses, and hat suddenly enters the Lion's Head pub and inn one snowy night demanding a room. He makes it very clear that he wants privacy and soon begins performing chemical experiments. The fellow is a scientist named Jack Griffin (Claude Rains), a young chap who, after five years of private work, discovered the secret of invisibility; unfortunately for him, he has yet to figure out an antidote, as becomes evident when he begins to shed his clothes and bandages - yep, the title was right, he really is the invisible man. Now most fellows, were they to become invisible, would probably run right out and try to see the girl next door in her birthday suit, but Griffin is different. That special ingredient in the potion tends to make a person just a little bit insane, and Griffin has already begun forming plans to get filthy rich and make the world grovel at his invisible feet. His surly attitude and just plain weirdness soon get him evicted, and soon his secret is out. He has a jolly good time playing pranks on local villagers, but his pranks soon turn to mass murder. The police dragnet is fun to watch (it isn't easy to catch an invisible man), but the movie takes a continually darker tone as the inevitable conclusion approaches. I am of the belief that the story of The Invisible Man really doesn't teach any sort of lesson with it, although others are certainly free to voice their own interpretations of the story. Griffin is just too disagreeable to teach me anything (apart from the ubiquitous "don't meddle in God's domain" thing).
The special effects in the film are actually quite amazing. Many of them are rather simple but well-done, and the central bits featuring clothes walking around on their own serve the story very well indeed. There is one scene featuring a pair of pants skipping down the road accompanied by Griffin singing the kind of ditty a madman might be prone to sing that is absolutely priceless. Alongside Dracula and Frankenstein, The Invisible Man completes the threesome of truly must-see 1930s Universal "monster" films, even though we all know it's really pure science fiction and not horror.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest films of all time!, 18 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
This film is a superb example of all that was best about Universal studios in their heyday. Featuring a superb performance from Claude Rains in the title role, it is a well crafted tale of one man`s descent into madness following an experiment gone wrong. The opening scenes and credits are wonderful and there is plenty of light humour too, but just in thr right places and it never detracts from the overall storyline. All in all a classic - what more is there to say ... other than if you havn`t seen this film - GET IT NOW!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow!, 16 Nov 2004
I don't want to go on, because I know that a lot of people don't read long reviews. But if you like special effects, it might be 70 years old, but in the Invisible Man, the effects you see are incredibly better than some you can see now even so many years later! And that's even before you consider just how good Claude Rains is! Buy it, buy it, buy it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars four stars for the original and best of "the invisible man" films., 18 Mar 2011
By 
jeremiah harbottle (Littlebourne, Kent.) - See all my reviews
the reason i only give four stars for this dvd set, is due to the excellence of the 1933 "invisible man" film. the acting, directing, script,narrative and special effects are all top notch and i shall always regard the film as a classic of horror.
regarding the sequels, only "the invisible man returns" is any good. vincent price is good to watch, his performance is effective although his voice isn't quite as distinctive nor as masculine as that of claude rains. cedric hardwicke is as bland and boring as ever but the film has plenty going on to keep audiences occupied until the end.
as for the other three films here, they range from being tolerable to absymal with "the invisible woman" being the worst one of the lot. "the invisible man's revenge" and "the invisible agent" are really just standard fare despite better special effects. jon hall is only bearable as the main character.
the documentary on the making of the 1933 film is well done and highly informative - the same as the other universal horror documentaries.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not seeing is believing!, 11 May 2003
By 
D. Pearce "djarmhp" (rainham, kent) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
This marvellous treatment of H.G.Wells classic novel has aged extremely well. When you are watching it, you find it scarcely credible that this film was made 70 years ago. By judicious use of special effects the unwrapping of the title character is almost as awe inspiring as it was when the film first came out.
Claude Rains does a marvellous job at building his unseen character through the power of his voice and the use of his body. When you think how expressive the face is the ability of Rains to do without it is an incredible example of the actor's art. He makes the scientist, by turns, sympathetic and loathsome without forsaking the reality of his character.
The other feature of this film is the humour, black and otherwise, which helps to add real character to the tale. It is a faithful and literary treatment of the novel that still enthrals. As far as the extras are concerned, the behind the scenes documentary is a fascinating insight into 30's film making. It is well worth the money of any sci-fi fan who wants to see how the genre started.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CAN'T SEE REGION 2 VERSION SO THE NEXT BEST THING, 30 Mar 2013
I have the laserdisc collection and i thoroughly enjoy all the films each time i view them.Can't see a region 2 version of this so you'll need a multi region player but worth it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Languages & Verdict, 23 Mar 2013
This review is from: The Invisible Man [Blu-ray] [1933] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
Blu-ray all zone

Ratio of the feature film:
1.33:1

Languages of the feature film:
- DTS Master Audio 2.0 (dual mono): English
- DTS 2.0 (dual mono): French, Italian, German, Castilian Spanish
- Dolby 2.0: Commentary with Film historian Rudy Behlmer (subtitled)

Subtitles for all the videos including the audio commentary:
- French, Italian, German, Castilian Spanish, English for the hearing impaired
Extra subtitles only available for the feature film:
- Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish

Verdict:
The very first film about an invisible man, shot in 1933, some very good special effects were used to make a man disappear and it works!
A very good picture for such an old film, nothing transcendent about the sound-track but it is clear with a suspenseful music.
The hight definition means details we are not supposed to see !!
- some wire holding objets can be seen like the one allowing the bicycle to go down the street.
- another one which is forgivable as it is much more difficult to complete is the back of the collar of Claude Rains' clothes which does not appear despite the fact his head is invisible !!
Nonetheless, a very good film due to a very clever story where every daily life are thought out.
Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 4 Sep 2012
By 
Mr. S. Kelly (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
In between Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein James Whale directed this classic adaptation of H. G. Wells famous story. It only clocks in at just over an hour long but Claude Rains - in his first role, I believe - gives a scene stealing performance, effortlessly carrying the film. The special effects are amazing for a film that is almost 80 years old. The price for this DVD is a steal too. The only down side is Una O'Connor's screeching appearance as an hysterical landlady which left my ears ringing. Thankfully, she doesn't have much on screen time and is frankly better seen as Olivia DeHaviland's handmaiden in The Adventures of Robin Hood. Still though, even though I loved it, my son was unimpressed so perhaps this is one for the classic movie lover rather than the 'seen it all before' crowd. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A true classic, 26 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
Wow, what do you say about such a classic film?
Usually Universal horror flicks always had that 30 min build up, which was great, but with The Invisible Man, the viewer is thrust right into the action from the first minute.

The effects for 1945 are simply amazing, as Rains as the man is immense.
James Whale was so far ahead of his time it's embarassing, and directs like a seasoned pro that he was.

I cannot praise this film enough, one of the absolute great horror flicks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It alters you, changes you., 2 May 2011
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Invisible Man [DVD] (DVD)
There's a snow storm blowing ferociously, a man trundles towards a signpost that reads Iping. He enters a hostelry called The Lions Head, the patrons of the bar fall silent for the man is bound in bandages. He tells, not asks, the landlady; "I want a room with a fire". This man is Dr. Jack Griffin, soon to wreak havoc and be known as The Invisible Man.

One of the leading lights of the Universal Monster collection of films that terrified and enthralled audiences back in the day. Directed by genre master James Whale, The Invisible Man is a slick fusion of dark humour, berserker science and genuine evil. Quite a feat for a film released in 1933, even more so when one samples the effects used in the piece. Effects that are still today holding up so well they put to shame some of the toy like expensive tricks used by the modern wave of film makers. John P. Fulton take a bow sir.

After Boris Karloff had turned down the chance to play the good doctor gone crazy, on account of the role calling for voice work throughout the film except a snippet at the finale, Whale turned to Claude Rains. Small in stature but silky in voice, Rains clearly sensed an opportunity to launch himself into Hollywood. It may well be, with Whale's expert guidance of course, that he owes his whole career to that 30 second appearance of his face at the end of the film?. As was his want, Whale filled out the support cast with odd ball eccentrics acted adroitly by the British & Irish thespians. Una O'Connor, Forrester Harvey, Edward E. Clive and Henry Travers are memorable. While American Gloria Stuart as the power insane Griffin's love interest is radiant with what little she has to do. Based on the now famous story written by H.G. Wells, Whale and R. C. Sheriff's {writer} version remains the definitive Invisible Man adaptation. There's some changes such as the time it is set, and Griffin is not the lunatic he is in the film-which is something that Wells was not too pleased about in spite of liking the film as a whole, but it's still tight to the source.

Sequels, TV series and other modern day adaptations would follow it, but none are as shrewd or as chilling as Whale's daddy is. 9/10
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Invisible Man [Blu-ray] [1933] [Region Free]
The Invisible Man [Blu-ray] [1933] [Region Free] by James Whale (Blu-ray - 2012)
7.00
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews