Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A brave kingdom
Reviews elsewhere will describe the literary merits of this Durrell classic. I found it a beautiful evocation of a Greek idyll. The wonderful characters belong to a different era which was about to disappear as war threatened. There is a description about a visit to the Jewish area in Corfu Town. I read the book while I was in Corfu and it was moving to visit the...
Published 23 months ago by Johnny99

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected.
I enjoyed this book but it was quite unexpected to find it in diary form, and therefore not a story as such, just a series of thoughts and observations. Durrell has a peculiar turn of phrase, some of it funny, some downright boring. I'm glad I've finished it, and I doubt I'll read it again.
Published 12 months ago by Janie S


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A brave kingdom, 12 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
Reviews elsewhere will describe the literary merits of this Durrell classic. I found it a beautiful evocation of a Greek idyll. The wonderful characters belong to a different era which was about to disappear as war threatened. There is a description about a visit to the Jewish area in Corfu Town. I read the book while I was in Corfu and it was moving to visit the synagogue to see the memorial to the families deported a few years later to their deaths.
The Kindle edition is timely as 2012 is the centenary of Durrell's birth and the bicentenary of Edward Lear's. The book contains a chapter on Lear's letters and some of his Corfu drawings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Prospero's Cell, 15 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
Still one of the best travel books about Corfu. More serious than Lawrence Durrell's brother Gerald's account (My Family and other Animals), it is witty and erudite. The title is based on a quite plausible theory that Shakespeare had Corfu in mind when he comceived Propsero's enchanted island in The Tempest. Who know, he may even have visited it?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Atmostpheric book, 29 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
Durrell as always writes beautifully. Bought as an accompaniment to a visit to Corfu, this book gives a wonderful insight into the life of a bohemian literary British ex-pat before the Second World War.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars PROSPERO'S CELL, 11 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
WRITTEN IN THE 1930'S IT IS STILL VERY READABLE. I AM READING IT AT THE SAME TIME AS A GERALD DURRELL BOOK AND THE PLACES WHEREABOUTS ARE STILL EASY TO FIND.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected., 18 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed this book but it was quite unexpected to find it in diary form, and therefore not a story as such, just a series of thoughts and observations. Durrell has a peculiar turn of phrase, some of it funny, some downright boring. I'm glad I've finished it, and I doubt I'll read it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Prospero's Cell?, 15 Sep 2012
By 
G. J. Hill - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Prospero's Cell (Faber Library 4): Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corfu (Kindle Edition)
Laurence Durrell's impressionistic memoir of the island of Corfu in the 1930's. The title of the book comes from a theory of one of it's Greek characters that Corfu is the location of Shakespeare's play The Tempest. The theory is partly based on the suggestion that the Greek name of the island - Κερκυρα - (transliterated by Durrell as 'Corcyra'), could be construed as an anagram of Sycorax, the witch who inhabited Prospero's island before he arrived. Durrell's own reflections on the literary connections of Corfu include the identification of the bay where Odysseus is washed up an found by Nausicaä. He suggests three possible locations and opts for Paleokastritsa as the most likely with his own careful blend of fine-writing and factual accuracy:

"... drenched in the silver of olives on the north-western coast. The little bay lies in a trance, drugged with its own extraordinary perfection - a conspiracy of light, air, blue sea and cypresses. [ .....] For the benefit of the more recondite, or for the mere specialist, one must record the existence of a great cave in the point immediately before the beach marked Hermones on the maps."

Durrell asserts that the best way to understand the character of Odysseus is to get to know modern Greeks who still display the ancient hero's temperament of a refusal to see things as they are : to live the 'myth' rather than the 'reality'. What, I wonder, would Durrell have made of the Greeks sitting along the low wall outside the Government offices below a banner demanding "pay us our wages and our pensions"? What does Athena whisper in their ears as British and German tourists saunter past their banner on the way between the town and the beach to spend euros in the bars and tavernas?

That anagram of 'Kerkyra' (as I think it should be transliterated) doesn't quite work. It's author, though a real person, is a fabulist for whom the imaginative construction of reality is superior to the tyranny of fact. Durrell knows this, but his memoir itself has the air of a construction, a narrative based on a willed view of the island, though also one based firmly on his experiences of living there.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews