Customer Reviews


894 Reviews
5 star:
 (329)
4 star:
 (172)
3 star:
 (109)
2 star:
 (80)
1 star:
 (204)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


403 of 435 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome internals under questionable interface
The new UI that greets you when you first log on to Windows 8 definitely takes you by surprise - and takes time getting used to. It definitely makes sense on a touch-enabled device, but very little on a traditional desktop/laptop. There are nice sides to it (weather app, easy searching a few others) - but I still find Microsoft's decision to "impose" it on non-touch users...
Published 22 months ago by Alexey Stepanov

versus
389 of 409 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Windows 8 Pro 64-bit.
Windows 8

I would advise that someone who wants to upgrade their machine to Windows 8 to first download Microsoft's upgrade advisor. This will check applications and hardware for compatibility with Windows 8.
Microsoft also has its own pages called Microsoft Compatibility Centre which lists a vast range of software and hardware which will (or won't) work...
Published 21 months ago by Master1


‹ Previous | 1 290 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

389 of 409 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Windows 8 Pro 64-bit., 22 Nov 2012
By 
Master1 (England, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
Windows 8

I would advise that someone who wants to upgrade their machine to Windows 8 to first download Microsoft's upgrade advisor. This will check applications and hardware for compatibility with Windows 8.
Microsoft also has its own pages called Microsoft Compatibility Centre which lists a vast range of software and hardware which will (or won't) work with Windows 8. Both 32-bit and 64-bit, Windows 8 RT and Windows 7 are also included.
Having worked in I.T. for many years (going back to the days of Windows 3.1), and have already installed the pre-releases of Windows 8, I knew what to expect from the upgrade and its new look.
My PC is nearly 4 years old with a 320 Gig Hard Drive, 4 Gigs of RAM, 1 Gig Nvidia Graphics card and a USB Wireless adapter.
I created a new spare partition from the free space on my Hard drive and copied over all the documents and data that I wanted to keep. I already had another copy of documents and data on DVD.
I powered up my machine and set it to boot from the Windows 8 DVD. I selected clean install, resized and formatted my first and second partitions. The installation was fairly quick and I had Windows 8 installed on my machine in under 1 hour.
Windows 8 had installed most drivers apart from my printer, Wireless Adapter and Graphics Card. I downloaded the latest drivers for my USB Wireless adapter and had some trials at getting it to work. Looking on the Internet I found that other people had the same issue and the solution was to install the driver in Windows 7 compatibility mode. Doing this I got access to the internet.
I ran the Windows update in the Control Panel and this downloaded a further 750 Megs of updates.
Once all the drivers where working I installed Office 2010 and other standard applications, and customised the Windows 8 Start tiles.
Finally I created a standard user account which I use for everyday use.

I have now been using Windows 8 for a couple of weeks without any problems, and no crashes.
I'm used to the interface and have created a few shortcuts on my desktop's start bar.

Should you upgrade to Windows 8 ?
If you are still using Windows XP, then remember that Microsoft will stop supporting it from 9th April 2014.
If you are still using Vista then Microsoft will stop supporting it from 18th April 2017.
If you are using Windows 7 and happy with it then the choice is yours if you want to upgrade to Windows 8. Support for Windows 7 will stop in 15th January 2020.
(That is the current dates for extended support from Microsoft. The products themselves will of course still work).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


298 of 319 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Runs well but seems to have become IWindows, 26 Oct 2012
By 
K. Trebell (Cornwall, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
Windows 8 runs well but is very different and the new tablet focused interface is somewhat jarring on a desktop PC. That this has been designed for platform devices to compete with the dominance of Apple is very apparent in its whole design.

When you boot, the first thing you see is the new Start Screen. This has replaced the old start menu and pulls apps and services together into this one screen presented as "live tiles" integrating deeply with Windows Live and it's services.

The look and feel is now very clearly optimised for tablets and it's going to be a shock to the system for a lot of people and you have to question whether it's of any real use to Windows 7 users who have all they need.

Programs are all now available via the "apps" search from the start screen, you need to search for them and can then pin them to there or your task bar. Once you start to get used to where things are it does fall into place. A tip for easier navigation is to press the windows key and just start typing the name of what you want to do.

If you prefer to work with the desktop in the traditional way then you'll want to hit the "desktop" option from the start screen.

I've tested a range of my programs and most worked fine for me. The only thing I've had to change was to switch to using Windows Defender for anti virus as my old one didn't work anymore.

Windows 8's main strength is in performance. It runs well and is slightly snappier than Windows 7 was. Having said that, you will get a much more significant speed boost if you install a Solid State drive, that brings huge gains rather than small boosts though I have experienced some reliability concerns of late with mine.

So windows 8... runs well but is very different and I couldn't recommend it for those happy with their current set-up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


403 of 435 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Awesome internals under questionable interface, 26 Oct 2012
By 
Alexey Stepanov (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
The new UI that greets you when you first log on to Windows 8 definitely takes you by surprise - and takes time getting used to. It definitely makes sense on a touch-enabled device, but very little on a traditional desktop/laptop. There are nice sides to it (weather app, easy searching a few others) - but I still find Microsoft's decision to "impose" it on non-touch users rather pre-mature.

HOWEVER - the moment you switch to the traditional desktop mode, this version shines. It loads/shuts down faster, it clogs your PC memory less, there are many small tweaks here and there. It's the "leanest" version out there - absolutely no bloatware (and the few "New UI" apps can be easily uninstalled - compare that to Vista!).

Very easy installation and initial setup.

So, to sum up - if you are using conventional desktops/laptops, most likely you won't use the New UI much - but in no way will it make your traditional desktop experience less efficient and productive. Treat it as just a new form of the now gone Start button, and it's a better form of it. Yes, you have to change the way you do a few things - but without that we'd be still stuck in the DOS era.

If you are using anything older than a Windows 7, go for it - it's a no brainer at this price. If you are using Windows 7 - you might stick to it... However, it is obvious that touch interface is the way forward - there is no coming back to the old ways. So why not embrace the new Windows and master it earlier, rather than later?..

PS Go for the upgrade version available through Microsoft website - it costs only 24.99, is only a 2GB download, and you can still use it for a "clean" install if you wish. Plus you can get the Media Center Upgrade for free for limited time on Microsoft's website as well.

EDIT Some of the readers seem to be confused by the "clean" install I mention in my "PS". Essentially, if you buy Win 8 from Amazon or download it directly from Microsoft, you have 2 options:
1) "Upgrade" to Win 8 - and keep your files, settings and programs (depending on Windows version you currently use).

2) Make a "Clean" install - that is format your system drive, thus deleting all your files, settings and programs etc, and install Win 8 from scratch. This has been the better way of moving to a new OS for ages, whether we talk about Windows, OSX etc. However, if this is something that sounds confusing for you, just ignore this option and enjoy the easy "upgrade" path:).

UPDATE 28/11/2013

So, more than 12 months into using the system, I must say most of the above points still hold (to clarify - have been using it on 2 desktops and 2 non-touch laptops):
- I have never got to using 'Modern UI' apps, bar occasional use of Weather and News apps
- The OS has proved very stable and 'light' in terms of resource footprint
- Shines on new hardware, boots up and shuts down instantly
- Very fast installation, especially on newer hardware

And with the free 8.1 update, I am ready to up the score to 4.5 out of 5:
- You can now boot directly into desktop
- You can switch the 'Modern UI' into showing 'all apps' instead
- The 'Start' button is back - sort of; it takes you to 'Modern UI' if you left click on it, but gives you all the key options when you right-click on it
- The above 3 points essentially allow you to avoid 'Modern UI' 99% of the time if you don't like/need it, giving you an extra light and fast OS without forcing you to adapt to new UI
- 'Modern UI' apps have been significantly updated, which has made them somehow useful even on a desktop PC
- SkyDrive native implementation is so convenient that it is my default folder for documents now.

Bottom line - with 8.1 update Windows 8 has removed the most annoying innovations while keep all the good stuff, and I see no reason to buy Windows 7 now at all, especially if using newer hardware.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I like it, 30 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
Upgraded from XP 32 bit to Windows 8 64 bit. You need to do a custom installation to achieve this. If you have some computer experience you can continue to use your existing files (but many applications will need to be reinstalled). I think it's best to install Win 8 onto a separate hard disk if you have one.

I like the new Windows. There is no Start button in the Desktop window, but think of the new 'Home' screen as one big start menu. You can find all your applications by typing a few characters into the search box, and they open up either in full-page mode, or inside the Desktop window.

Windows 8 has its own anti-virus and firewall, so no need to get a separate program to slow it down.

Review update - things I forgot to mention 1st time round:

* You are confronted with your 1st tough decision upon installing... should you set up a Microsoft account or a Local account?? Here's my advice:
Set your *1st* account up as a *Local* account, it is the admin account. You won't have access to any apps in the App Store etc. but the admin account does *not* need these features (App Store apps are installed per-user, not for the whole computer). Once ready, you can create your user accounts for all the users you need, and these are suitable as Microsoft accounts - all the new features of Win 8 will work.

* Win 8 had a built-in driver for everything on my computer - it's 6 years old, so not surprising. Old logitech webcam does not work, nor does bluetooth modem.

* I can dual boot with XP after custom-installing on a separate drive - I do not enjoy going back to XP, but it's there if I need it.

* I am resisting re-installing iTunes, it pretty much destroyed my XP performance, and I don't want to risk ruining Win 8 - which is smooth and fast enough, even on my old computer.

* If you previously used Windows Live Mail: You can install it again in Win 8, and point the mail store to your old location. It upgrades beautifully, and all you will need to do is put your passwords in again. All your messages, accounts etc will be set up. You need to export your contacts from the old installation and import them into the new version. Search the web for detailed instructions on locating and setting the mail store for Windows Live Mail. It needs .Net 3.5 and I could only install that from the Win 8 DVD, it did not work from the web - again, search the web for installing .Net 3.5 in Win 8.

2nd update:
Also worth mentioning Windows 8 has built-in parental controls, using Microsoft logins. For your children's login accounts, you can get detailed activity reports, and the ability to block various web sites and applications if you need to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tablets and computers are not the same thing., 24 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
The PC version of Windows 8 is an early attempt by Microsoft to merge tablets and computers into the same concept. To do this, they have created an interface that works on both and a single application store similar to Apple's IOS or Google's Android. Although the traditional ways of working on the desktop still exist, it is clear from the default way the Modern (Metro) interface loads first, the lack of a conventional Start Menu and the App Store itself that Microsoft's priority is the new tablet-style interface.

The problem is that computers and tablets are used differently, typically the former will be used for more complicated tasks. However, anybody trying multi-tasking on more complicated jobs using the Modern (Metro) interface will soon discover the flaws of a tablet-style approach. Simpler does not mean more efficient in this case. The same case can in fact be used to justify the mouse over the touch-screen. A touch-screen may be more intuitive, but the precision a mouse gives cannot be matched by the new technology.

In short then:

Pros:

* Simplicity - Windows 8 may appeal to those people who are unfamiliar with computers in general, the Modern interface does simplify things.

* Boot times - As the operating system hibernates instead of shuts down every time you turn it off, boot times are much faster. However, this may ultimately impact on stability.

* Desktop - For now at least, we can largely still use the traditional Windows ways of doing things.

Cons:

* Less efficient - It's hard to justify how using the new Modern UI is more efficient than the old one.

* Compares poorly to Windows 7 - After using both, Windows 8 clearly feels less streamlined, professional and polished than the previous version. This is obviously not a good thing for an upgrade

* App Store - The fact that all Metro apps must be installed from the Microsoft store threatens to undermine the sheer flexibility that made computers so popular over the last 15 years.

In conclusion, Windows 8 is only a good upgrade for those relatively new to computers or those looking for future-proof investments, All others should probably stick to Windows 7.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hmmm, 27 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
Installed and removed the same night. Looks good and I suppose if I give it a chance it will be a good os. But I need to work and I have enough software to learn without relearning the os that I have been using for years
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Windows 8 Pro upgrade, 25 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
I bought windows8 mostly out of curiosity, and to upgrade my Windows XP desktop machine. The instalation was easy and took only about half an hour.
Having played around with it now for a couple of weeks I can only say I am a little dissapointed. It certainly does not live up to all the hype. I have still to find any of the Windows Apps to be at all interesting, though to be fair I have only looked at the free ones. I have installed Office which works fine and one or two other programs which also ran OK.
So far I haven't managed to dfo anything that I could not have done on Windows 7.
Maybe I will make more use of it as time goes by, but first impressions are a complete non event, which has added nothing new to my IT experience, so the best I can give is two& a half stars
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stick with Windows 7, 17 Jan 2013
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
It would seem windows 8 was designed with tablet PCs in mind and they've implemented this horrible metro interface. They're tried to make this "Hip and down with the kids" but they've forgotten what most people want out of their operating systems and that's simple functionality. Even closing an application takes some fiddling around or searching for a guide, because a simple red x button or minimize would be such a hard thing to include(rolls eyes). There is ofcourse a desktop screen which is more familiar, but without a start menu. You can download unofficial third party applications to install a start menu and make it more like Windows 7, but why not just stick with windows 7 and have better program/game compatibility to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


370 of 413 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A shock to the system at first - less productive and natural to use than Windows 7, 26 Oct 2012
By 
Paul W (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
Update 07 Nov 2012:

After 10 days of on and off use of Windows 8 final version I'm afraid I still can't say I like it. Windows 7 just works well for me and Windows 8 too often gets in the way. I can work round Windows 8's less than desktop friendly design but I don't upgrade just so I can "work round issues". I upgrade for increased features, performance or productivity. When I upgraded a few years ago from the awful Windows Vista to Windows 7 I was over the moon with how much better Windows 7 was. Windows 8 feels the opposite - like a downgrade from something that works to something that "challenges" you to get on with your work and keeps getting in the way. Yes you can work round its interface issues but why spend money and time doing this when Windows 7 works well on the desktop.

I've seen lots of comments by other users saying how Windows 8 is a massive performance boost. But this has not been my experience. Boot time is faster but otherwise it seems the same speed as Windows 7.

Perhaps its me? Others claim amazing boosts of speed - so I had a look on the Internet for reviews and one thing they do agree on is Windows 8 does boot faster.

However in terms of performance its largely the same as Windows 7 overall. Sometimes Windows 8 is faster, sometimes Windows 7 is faster.

Tomshardware website benchmarked games performance and said

"With A Couple Of Exceptions, Gaming on Windows 8 Is A Similar Experience

Aside from those couple of idiosyncrasies, performance under Windows 8 is indistinguishable from Windows 7. Any speed-up or slow-down would be almost impossible to identify during game play, and we expect compatibility issues to get patched quickly by game developers."

Website Bit-tech benchmarked a final release version of Windows 8 and found:

"All in all our benchmarks suggest that performance does take a hit when upgrading to Windows 8. The multi-tasking performance degradation is a particular blow to Windows 8, but one which the faster boot times do soften somewhat"

But you can also find reviews where Windows 8 comes out faster. I suspect the reality is the performance is overall the same.

Also Microsoft removed the pretty Aero interface and replaced with a plainer and less CPU demanding interface - which may well help performance. You can easily disable Areo on Windows 7 if you wish for a very slight performance boost.

I've also looked at lots of reviews to see the "amazing new features" of Windows 8. But to be honest there is nothing I've seen that's made me think - "WOW - that feature alone is worth the hassle of upgrading"

Overall Windows 8 is really Windows 7 but re-designed for tablets and smartphones.

Original Review:

Windows 7 - to copy Apple's marketing "Just works" on the desktop.

I've been using Windows for almost 20 years and Windows 7 is the best Windows for the desktop ever - reliable - easy to use and make your life easy and productive.

I've downloaded and installed Windows 8 on a spare PC and I have to say its the most stressful version of Windows ever!

Forgot everything you have learnt before and prepare to start from scratch and learn a whole new OS.

With each new version of Windows I found my productivity increased. With Windows 8 I found productivity hit rock bottom for a while as I re-learned how to do the things that had become second nature on earlier Windows.

I'm typing this on my Windows 7 PC after a session on Windows 8 and its good to be home - where everything is familiar and easy.

Windows 8 is very much a tablet operating system that can be installed on desktop and laptops but not specifically designed for desktops.

I've not tried Windows 8 on a tablet but I can only assume it works very well there.

Overtime on the desktop you will learn Windows 8's new ways and how to cope with it on a desktop. But it never really feels as natural or easy to use as Windows 7 was on a desktop.
Initially you'll spend a lot of time Googling simple things like "How do I minimise a window", "Where's the control panel", "How do I close a program"

For example when I first ran Internet Explorer and downloaded a PDF file on the Internet. This caused Windows PDF viewer to open. This is an "App" not a program - it uses the Metro interface. So it means no minimise options, no close PDF document options. It runs full screen and cannot be windowed.

So on Windows 7 if I want to open say 3 PDF documents and view them at the same time in separate windows I can do this easily. On Windows 8 this appears to be impossible - the default Metro app is full screen and can open only one document at a time - so no way of reading and comparing multiple documents.

There are ways round this ( install Adobe Reader ) and a quick search on Google will find a solution. But spending time solving these annoyances takes up time and reduces productivity.

Another "issue" that may confuse people is there are two version of Internet Explorer 10 in Windows. There's the Metro version and the desktop version of Internet Explorer 10. They both look and behave slightly differently. As someone who sometimes has to provide computer support I can see this is going to confuse some people!

This brings me on to the Start Screen - which has replaced the Start Menu. The Start screen looks a little Fisher Price in design but I thought never the less it might be useful as a way of quick accessing my most popular programs. The first issue - if you use Internet Explorer - is that as far as I can tell you can only add the Metro version of Internet Explorer to the Start Screen. The desktop Internet Explorer - the one most useful on a desktop - is not available via the Start Screen - you need to go to the desktop and then click the Internet Explorer icon. I did Google for a while to find a solution but couldn't. I also found the Start Screen rather limiting in terms of organising tile shortcuts to software. As far as I can tell you can't change the size of the tiles and while you can move them about only within certain "slots". Ideally I'd like 3 large tiles at the top for my most popular software and smaller ones beneath - but so far I've failed to figure out how to do this even after a bit of Googling. I guess I need to spend more time researching this but I've proper work to get on with!

And that's the way it is with Windows 8. Instead of doing boring work you initially spend your time much more fruitfully by Googling solutions to things that were easy and obvious on Windows 7.

An operating system should be invisible - it should let you get on with your work as quickly and easily as possible. It shouldn't keep getting in your way and forcing you to stop to look for ways round operating system issues.

For example in I think Windows 7 Microsoft introduced the ability to Pin large icons to the Start menu. I used this to pin my 5 most used programs. So now I have 3 quick ways of launching a program. Either via a large icon on the start menu. Via an icon on the desktop. Or via a pinned icon on the task bar. I used a combination of all three because I have a lot of software installed and it worked great for me as with a mouse I could quickly open my most used applications. Now with Windows 8 I have no start menu - we still have icons on the desktop and the task bar but lost the Start menu. That's not progress for me - that's a step backwards. Also the Start menu pinned icons let you mouse over them and you'd see your last opened documents ( or pinned documents ). So in a few shakes of a mouse I could mouse over Excel icon and then mouse over one of my most used spreadsheets and open it. All done very quickly and easily. Now in Windows 8 I need to go to a desktop icon and launch Excel. Then once in Excel go to the recent documents menu and then select the document. So what was easy and quick in Windows 7 is now a little more work in Windows 8. Doesn't sound a big deal but all these little things that help speed up your use of the system help and mount up when you do them a lot. If in a fit of madness I was to upgrade my main desktop to Windows 8 I'd lose these little shortcuts and as far as I can see not gain a whole lot in compensation.

Eventually Microsoft will kill off all former versions of Windows and the Windows 8 way will be the only way. My plan is to keep using Windows 7 for as long as possible! The only reason I installed Windows 8 on a spare computer is as well as writing software I also have to provide support for it - and eventually my customers will be using Windows 8 and so I need to know how to use Windows 8.

I really wish Microsoft had released a Windows for tablets and a separate Windows for desktops. They are quite different devices and have quite different interface requirements. By creating one Windows for tablets and desktops its created an operating system that just doesn't quite work as well on desktops - I think Microsoft have prioritised the needs of tablets.

Having said all this while I personally haven't taken to Windows 8 I'm sure some people will absolutely love it. I use Windows at work - I'm a software developer - and therefore need something productive for content creation. But if you use it mostly at home for content consumption - say browsing the internet and sending the odd email - then it may well be you will love the new Windows 8.

One thing I would recommend to make life more bearable on Windows 8 is learning some of its new keyboard shortcuts. There's a lot of things that can either no longer be done on a mouse or for which using a mouse is more challenging.

On the plus I've found Windows 8 installation to be very smooth and trouble free but no better than Windows 7. Windows 8 also seems fairly rock solid - no major crashes or issues. Again no better than Windows 7.

And eventually it does become easier to use and more productive - not as easy to use or productive as Windows 7 but certainly better than the initial shock you get on first running Windows 8.

********************************
Summary
********************************

Apologies if this review is a bit of a long ramble.

To summarise:

1. Going from an earlier version of Windows to Windows 8 is a major shock to the system

2. A fair bit of re-learning is required. Depending on your skills level this might take a few hours or a few weeks.

3. Time spent re-learning Windows would be fine if at the end of the learning you find yourself working more productively. But even with time while Windows 8 becomes easier to use it still feels like someone tried to shoehorn a tablet OS on to a desktop. It just requires a bit more effort on a desktop than Windows 7.

4. So essentially you end up spending time learning something that ends up not being quite as good as what you already had!

5. Windows 8 seems very stable and was easy to upgrade. But no more stable than Windows 7.

6. There's no massive new features in Windows 8 that make you think "I really must upgrade just for that new feature"

7. It loses some features. Would you like to play a DVD movie? Not on Windows 8 you won't unless you pay for an upgrade! Start button? Not without buying some new software to bring it back

8. You can simply ignore the new Start Screen - though it will keep popping up when you do certain things every so often whether you like it or not.

9. Ignoring the Start Screen you have the same desktop as Windows 7 - but no Start menu. I actually found the Start menu useful! So for me its removal is not a bonus

10. I've not found a clean Windows 8 to be any faster than a clean Windows 7. But I am running them off a fairy fast computer with SSD drives

A one word summary "New Window 8 - like Windows 7 but with no Start menu and everything in new places".

If you have been using Windows before and often thought to yourself - "When will they get rid of that damn Start menu" then Windows 8 is your dream come true! Personally I found it very useful....

*******************************************

Useful keyboard short cuts which I found off the Cnet website include:

Charms
Win+C: Open charms
Win+Q: Search charm
Win+H: Share charm
Win+K: Devices charm
Win+I: Settings charm

Search
Win+Q: Search apps
(tip: an even easier way to search apps is to just begin typing from the start screen)
Win+W: Search settings
Win+F: Search files
Windows 8 Apps
Win+Z: Get to app options
Win+.: Snap app to the left
Win+Shift+.: Snap app to the right
Ctrl+Tab: Cycle through app history
Alt+F4: Close an app

Desktop
Win+D: Open Desktop
Win+,: Peek at desktop
Win+B: Back to desktop

Other
Win+X: Open system utility settings menu
Win+PrntScrn: Take screenshot and save to Pictures
Win+Tab: Open switch list
Win+T: Preview open windows in taskbar
Win+U: Open Ease of Access Center
Ctrl+ESC: Start screen

Learning some of these keyboard short cuts does make Windows 8 a little easier to use.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Stick With Windows 7 on Desktop, 28 Dec 2012
By 
This review is from: Windows 8 Pro, Upgrade Edition [Upgrade from Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7] (PC) (DVD-ROM)
I upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 8 Pro three weeks ago and the writing of this review will be my last use of Windows 8 before I revert back to 7.

The radical overhaul of the user interface seems to be a feature that many users working on desktops just don't like -However, the UI isn't the sticking point for me. While it's a a whole new Windows experience, once you get a little accustomed to it, it's slick enough and relatively intuitive (bar Microsoft's well-documented but still bewildering decision to omit a 'Start' tab from the task bar in desktop view). The problem for me with Windows 8 is that the 64-bit version at least appears to operate more like a Beta than a general release and I've encountered several stability and compatibility issues.

From the outset, I had issues with vanishing interface icons. My particular issue is related to some sort of conflict between the system fonts and my own custom fonts (had the same fonts on Windows 7 without a moment of trouble), but a quick browse of internet forums readily demonstrates that Windows 8 icons are prone to disappearance for any number of reasons leaving users with an unusable interface or at best a dependency on the alt tags for navigation. Not good.

In addition to this problem, despite the MS compatibility checker informing me that my machine, peripherals and software were all compatible with Windows 8, I've since discovered that my Wacom graphic tablet has very limited functionality(depsite installation of the latest driver), Norton Ghost isn't compatible at all and hence won't work on Windows 8 (although admittedly Norton Ghost is now a bit ancient) and several of my Adobe applications have become very unstable since operating within Windows 8 (including Photoshop and Illustrator both of which are CS6 editions). I've tried to rectify the latter issue by uninstalling, reinstalling then updating the programmes but it's made absolutely no difference at all. Adobe 64 bit software just doesn't seem to like the 64 bit Windows 8 operating system.

My final gripe is with IE10 which (inevitably) comes bundled with Windows 8. I think there are very few people in this day and age who haven't yet realised that Internet Explorer is a piece of trash in comparison with other browsers and has been for several years now. I didn't ever expect IE10 to live up to the laughable 'blazing fast' claims of the MS advert and I wasn't disappointed. It's by and large the same piece of retrograde junk that it has been for the last decade with the additional 'bonus' of delivering the worst text rendering I've seen in a browser for a long time.

These issues combined make Windows 8 a dead duck for me. It's a shame because I actually think it could be a very good platform -it has some really nice features and the boot speed is very good indeed. I'll probably take another look at it after six months worth of updates have been released (or maybe when the first service pack is issued), but for now, it seems that there are just too many shortcomings for it to be an effective and efficient platform.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 290 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews