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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required reading
This is a truly excellent book. A must read for everyone really - particularly those looking for ways to reduce the nonsense that fills so much of life.
Published 21 months ago by Nicholas Winstanley

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lots of interesting information, but not convinced by much of thesis.
Rushkoff argues that we have begun to experience life as one long moment, always in the present, with no beginning and no end. As a result, we have stopped emphasizing narratives in our movies and tv shows; we attempt to be everywhere at once both in attention and physically; we try to make everything happen now rather than waiting; and we oversee patterns due to an...
Published 3 months ago by Nicholas


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lots of interesting information, but not convinced by much of thesis., 4 Feb. 2015
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Rushkoff argues that we have begun to experience life as one long moment, always in the present, with no beginning and no end. As a result, we have stopped emphasizing narratives in our movies and tv shows; we attempt to be everywhere at once both in attention and physically; we try to make everything happen now rather than waiting; and we oversee patterns due to an overdose of data points. It is an interesting and compelling point, that we are placing less and less emphasis on things that are not happening now, and are overwhelmed by everything that supposedly is.

Beyond that interesting claim, however, I didn’t find the rest of his thesis convincing. His argument that we no longer value narrative arcs, supposedly evidenced in flashback heavy Family Guy episodes, just doesn’t seem reasonable. Modern life is certainly accelerated, as Alvin Toffler argued in his book Future Shock, and it seems that the faster it gets, the faster we demand it goes. It seems to me though that we show just as much need for narrative arcs as ever, though perhaps less patience for long ones. Family guy still has a story – it’s just short and shallow.

Despite being on a fascinating topic, Present Shock didn’t add as much as I had hoped to the discussion, introducing few new ideas or ways of thinking about the world. There is interesting information in Present Shock, but I found a lot of it unlikely to be causal or irrelevant.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required reading, 29 Aug. 2013
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This is a truly excellent book. A must read for everyone really - particularly those looking for ways to reduce the nonsense that fills so much of life.
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Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now
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