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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice and catchy.
Nice and catchy work on regulatory focus. Now it is one of the trending topics at the field of Industrial Org. Psychology.
Published 11 months ago by engin bagis

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too long and boring
This book is very boring. I am a devoted reader of Halvorson and her book "Succeed" is THE best book I read on the topic of personal improvement. However "focus" fails to meet my expectations. The 230 pages are solely discussing positive / negative motivation. Every reader with average IQ gets the point after the first few pages, however the book does not stop there, it...
Published 12 months ago by michalu


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too long and boring, 16 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Focus: Use Different Ways of Seeing the World for Success and Influence (Kindle Edition)
This book is very boring. I am a devoted reader of Halvorson and her book "Succeed" is THE best book I read on the topic of personal improvement. However "focus" fails to meet my expectations. The 230 pages are solely discussing positive / negative motivation. Every reader with average IQ gets the point after the first few pages, however the book does not stop there, it goes on with an example after example for the remaining 200 pages. The examples are endless and all very similar - you get the point immediately. This book could be at best 30 pages long or it could be a very good blog post.

One problem I have with this kind of books is that it is often a waste of time to read 230 pages of some idea in an age when you can get information more effectively and it is the time that is scarce. I believe readers should be more demanding if their aim is not a mere entertainment. Focus is one of those books - it's inefficient to devote 230 to this single idea ( unless it goes in depth ) and reading all those positive / negative focus examples feels like an utter waste of time.

Instead search for some of the Halvorson's blogs on "positive / negative motivation" and save yourself hours of time. Or better read "Succeed" there is a chapter devoted to this topic and it more than sufficient.

I feel like giving it 1 star, but I assume that the fair value to someone who was not previously familiar with positive / negative motivation might be slightly higher so I give it 2.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice and catchy., 17 Sep 2013
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Nice and catchy work on regulatory focus. Now it is one of the trending topics at the field of Industrial Org. Psychology.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Really good read, 27 May 2013
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Very insightful read and changed how I went about approaching tasks in all facets of my life. It is a well organised easy to read book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should your focus be on promotion or prevention? "It's the fit that counts.", 17 April 2013
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
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One of the most important human skills is the ability to establish and then sustain focus. There are several different types of focus because concentration can help to achieve so many different objectives. Heidi Grant Halvorson and E. Tory Higgins focus on four: Good and Bad Promotion Focus, and, Good and Prevention Focus. As they explain, promotion focus "is about maximizing gains and avoiding missed opportunities...at its core, satisfying our need for nurturance" whereas prevention focus "is about minimizing losses, to keep things going...is about satisfying our need for security." Whether or not either focus is good or bad depends almost entirely on two factors: whether or not is effective, and, whether or not the result is desirable.

Halvorson and Higgins wrote this book to help those who read it to "use different ways of seeing the world for success and influence." In other words, they want to prepare their reader to select the most appropriate focus to achieve the given objective, especially when someone else is involved. Nurturance and security are not mutually exclusive but each poses unique challenges to those who would obtain it. Halvorson and Higgins include a self-diagnostic on Page 6 that helps their reader to identify their "actuals," "ideals" and "oughts." A person need not have one dominant motivation but most people do.

Some of the most interesting material is provided in Chapter 9 as they explain why "it's the fit [of the person to the motivation] that matters." In that event, "you feel right, you become strongly engaged, and information is easier to process and remember. Feedback feels fair, and performance is enhanced. And this is only the beginning. Now that you understand [begin italics] how [end italics] it works, you are ready to see what it can do for you." Eventually in the book, the reader will also learn how to use this increased understanding of fit when supervising others. As I read Chapter 9, I was reminded of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's valuable insights concerning what he characterizes as "flow," the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity.

These are among the dozens of passages that caught my eye, also listed to suggest the scope of Halvorson and Higgins's coverage:

o Why a Dominant Focus (Pages 6-9)
0 But Aren't Optimists Happier? (29-32)
o Paying Attention to Details (38-40)
0 Who's the Boss? (44-47)
o The Three Self-Concepts: Actual, Ideal, and Ought; The Birth of the Ideal Self Guide; and The Birth of the Ought Guide (53-57)
0 When Things Go Wrong, and Should I Stay or Go? (82-85)
o Why We Buy (105-107)
0 The Right Way to Run Things (113-116)
o Clues from Behavior, Choices, and Feelings (134-137)
0 Two Paths to Persuasion (156-160)
o Inspirational Role Model or Cautionary Tale? (166-169)
0 Fit Helps You Get It Done (174-179)
o Cialdini's "Six weapons of influence in the battle to direct human behavior" (183-184)
0 Why We Need a Good Fit Now More Than Ever (197-198)
o Fit Loosens the Purse Strings (206-209)

Heidi Grant Halvorson and E. Tory Higgins provide "A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating Motivational Fit" in Chapter 13 and then, before concluding their book with a strong reassurance to their reader: "Your life is more empowered once you have learned about promotion and prevention focus and what fits with them. This is true, in part, because you realize how you can be much more effective in just about everything you do -- by working with what fits your focus, capitalizing on your strengths, and compensating when you can for your weaknesses."
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