Customer Reviews


176 Reviews
5 star:
 (116)
4 star:
 (41)
3 star:
 (17)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good honest truthful reading
I have read many books concerning this subject and this one is by far the most truthful account of the sas in action during the first Gulf Conflict.
The others do in most cases make good reading but if you read them all with care you will find a whole host of inconsistencies amongst the various authors.
I really enjoyed this book easy writing style,never a dull...
Published on 20 Sep 2003 by mike

versus
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good plot that gets destracted...
This is essentially a good book about non-fictitious SAS activities and in the main is enjoyable.

The negative part of this review is that as the book goes on, the author becomes more 'me,me,me' and makes out that the majority of those around him are, for want of a better word, 'tools' and nowhere near as capable, confident or able as he is - granted he was was...
Published 12 months ago by James Mousley


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good honest truthful reading, 20 Sep 2003
By 
mike (durham england) - See all my reviews
I have read many books concerning this subject and this one is by far the most truthful account of the sas in action during the first Gulf Conflict.
The others do in most cases make good reading but if you read them all with care you will find a whole host of inconsistencies amongst the various authors.
I really enjoyed this book easy writing style,never a dull moment or area in the book where i thought this is getting boring Peter Ratcliffe should write more about his experiences with the SAS iam sure he could entertain his readers with some excellent stories, after all you cannot spend 25 years of your life in the worlds most respected and feared regiment without having some memories to write about.
I hope Mr Ratcliffe reads this and decides to put pen to paper again.
A great read reccomended to anybody
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye of the storm - a must read, 30 April 2005
By 
I searched for a while to get this book and once I begun to read it I could not put it down. Having served in the army for 10 years I have read many military history books about the Gulf war, Falklands and in particualrly the Troubles in Northern Ireland. I first thought that I would stereo type a Para trooper who then went on SAS selection and expected many beefed up war stories but I was wrong. This book is fantastic in that he tells his whole career and very good war stories to the level where it is not too much or two little. His experiences of action and military life is brilliant and would recommend any body to read it. For a soldier who has gone through a hell of a lot and survived to tell his story is magic - well done 'Billy' Ratcliffe
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite possibly the best Special ops book ever written, 17 Feb 2005
By A Customer
This is one of the most honest and complete insider accounts of life in a spec ops unit I have ever read. While many other ex-spec ops authors (particularly from the SAS) have sensationalized accounts of their experiences to romanticize their service and heighten their heroism, Peter Ratcliffe portrays events from a strictly realistic and insightful perspective. Furthermore, Ratcliffe's memoir offers a much more complete view of the SAS than any previous account. His career spanned decades and took him through numerous campaigns of action. He experienced being a rank-and-file trooper, a patrol leader, and also a member of the 'Headshed'. Basically, Ratcliffe gives a very thorough account of how things work on all levels of the chain of command, and he is able to describe an incomparable number of combat operations from a firsthand perspective.
Ratcliffe's account of SAS action is a sobering, no-nonsense contrast to the sensationalistic portrayals offered by men like Andy McNab. He shows readers that its not all gun blazing heroism, and its never perfect. Patrols fail to reach their objectives simply because they get lost in the woods. Large numbers of men die in a helicopter crash before seeing any action. A covert beach landing is aborted because the boats don't work and men are being swept away in the ocean. Highly trained troops who've never been tested in a real war sometimes turn out to be irrational and cowardly under fire. A few commanders are so concerned about risking their lives that they abandon missions without even trying. Even deep behind enemy lines, an SAS unit is not immune to bickering and politics within the chain of command. This is the real world. The SAS is human, and is therefore prone to human faults, human error, and human fear just as ordinary people are.
But despite his sometimes blunt criticism of certain people, it is never Ratcliffe's intention to denigrate his unit. Conversely, he exemplifies the SAS's strict standards of excellence by holding his men accountable for their faults and pointing out how things can sometimes be done better. There are a few instances where Ratcliffe seems to be a little less than fair. With regards to the Bravo Two Zero mission, one does get the sense that Ratcliffe tries to alleviate the SAS leadership's responsibility for that catastrophe. Regardless, Eye of the Storm is probably still the most accurate and thorough account of SAS service ever written. Peter Ratcliffe is a man who has no need to validate himself behind false tales of heroism. He knows that he has made great accomplishments in one of the most challenging and dangerous professions in the world. He is therefore able to tell the truth, confident that his story is worth telling without any fabrications.
Eye of the Storm has done more to heighten my layman's understanding of spec ops than any other SAS book I've ever read. For those interested in military, spec ops, or the SAS in particular, this is essential reading. I cannot recommend this book enough.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exellent!, 20 Jun 2005
This was a brilliant read, Once i picked the book up i could not put it down. It is a very truthful account of the Authors time served in first the Paracute Regiment and then 22 SAS Regiment. Many times during the book the Author corrects some Falses and exagerations from other members of the Regiment that have written books, for example Chris Ryan and Andy Mcnab. This is a must read for any Military personal serving or served.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A no-nonsense honest account of the SAS, 24 Aug 2004
By 
Mr. S. White (Maidenhead, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This by far the best book I've read on the SAS. The author is a former RSM in 22 SAS, which means he can speak with some experience and authority. Instead of glamourising the elite unit, he shows us that there are idiots there, that they make mistakes, and that they are, after all, only human. It starts off with his early life, his time in the Parachute Regiment (which is another of the world's elite fighting units) and then on to the SAS. I found his approach to be a practical, direct and hands-on one, which shows in his writing style. A must for all military enthusiasts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A true voice from inside the SAS!, 13 Mar 2005
When I decided to buy this book, I was wondering how the author's stories would compare to that of Cameron Spence and Yorky Crossland. I was interested to see whether he was a typical member of the regiment; or just a lucky nut-case who survived in the SAS for 25 years!
The book starts by describing his childhood; which is very interesting to say the least. It then goes onto his selection process with the Paras', which he seems to pass with distinction. This phase of the book is very exciting and you don't want to put the book down. After this he describes his time serving with the Paras' and how he decided to go for 22nd SAS Selection.
He doesn't say much about this, but does point out his opinions on what should be done to make selection better, and some funny moments in the 'Combat Survival' phase.
He describes in detail the Oman war, the the CT team, the Falklands war and the Gulf war. He also mentions the Peterhead Prison seige, which he was involved in. All are written superbly. He puts his opinions through clearly and expertly. To hear advice from a RSM from the 22nd SAS is quite something in my mind, an opinion that is more than likely to be correct!
The Gulf campaign is partly the reason why I bought the book. To hear another side to the 'Alpha One Zero' mission was extremely interesting. Most points are the same. Although Peter does point out that a few other authors have made exaggerations in their books.
Another reason I bought this book was because it apparantly 'sealed up' the 'Bravo Two Zero' ghosts and provided the most feasable answer to the myths of the patrol. I can honestly say that it does do this. I have great respect to Andy McNab, Chris Ryan (I've read their books too!)and all the other members of the patrol. The members who have written about their experiences where most probaly poorly advised into writing their book, thus causing them to add a few more dramas. I agree with the author that I find the story amazing enough; without any major contacts, but still hold great respect for the men.
This book is excellent. A great buy. Any reader interested in the SAS or Special Forces should buy this now! It's great!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SAS - Slagging And Spiteful?, 13 Jan 2004
By A Customer
A good read. Mind you with so many contrary accounts of the SAS in the first Gulf war, who do we believe? Probably Ratcliffe more than anyone else, but still it makes you wonder.
This book, more than the other McNab/Ryan/Spence/Crossland stories, shows the SAS in a bad light. It tells of cowardice, incompetence, bad planning and basic stupidity in the ranks of what was once (still is?) the most capable military unit in the world. As such it is very worrying. One of Stirling's initial requirements for the then-new SAS was "The unrelenting pursuit of excellence". After reading this book, one wonders if that is in any way still true. Cant put it down, a real page-turner, but the sideline issues of rivalry, cowardice and basic stupidity are the real surprise.
This book will encourage Britain's enemies.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read. Well done to the author, 6 April 2005
By A Customer
As a 'virginal' reader of SAS books I approached this from a different angle. I had not read Bravo two zero or any other Gulf war/SAS books previously. I have however read piles of factual (well as factual as can be) books about the SAS and their methods etc.. I haven't read any of the numerous McNab style books because I didn't want to have to wade through the rubbish to get to the factual stuff. Peter Ratcliffes book however, was a godsend! No hyperbole, No 'added on drivel' just realistic accounts of his career. Warts and all. Well done Billy. A great book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye of the Storm, 3 Jun 2005
This is a book by someone, like ex SAS Robin Horsfall,Who dosn't hide behined wrong names . A man who is not afraid to show his face, all in all, a book that deserves to be on your book shelf. If you are interested in the SAS, Then Peter Ratcliffe..Robin Horsfall..and Michael Asher. are the ones to go for. 100 stars all the way.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an eye opener, 19 Dec 2002
By A Customer
like many young men(my age being 20) i have read many books on the army the majority of them about the special forces, i used to regard the book bravo two zero as my bible,the eye of the storm however changes that it changed my entire point of view it told what in most peoples eyes would be the most realistic account of the sas in action in the golf war. i myself am now a serving member in the parachute regiment i joined up two months after reading this book,it did not influence my decision. however i can vouch for the fact that not all rsm's are as fair minded as peter ratcliff appears to be.all in all a good book and well worth a read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews