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4.6 out of 5 stars16
4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 30 January 2008
Having worked for a Care Agency for many years I have looked after several people with Parkinson's Disease. Their's can be a lonely path to tread and I am convinced that many sufferers would benefit from reading (or being read) Sarah Nock's book and derive the kind of easing felt when realising one is not alone. The insights of the 'insider', observed with wit, wisdom and a clearly indomitable spirit will surely bring comfort to many and hopefully (as they do for me) some clarity and understanding for carers and families.
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on 8 October 2007
This is a wonderful book, about Parkinson's Disease, from a woman who has lived with the condition for more than twenty years. At the very least, it will make you laugh. And if you have Parkinson's yourself, it may give you strength and inspiration, as well as quite a few practical suggestions, to help you continue to live a full and creative life.
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on 1 November 2007
Difficult to put down. I actually read this brave, funny [and distinctly literary] memoir in one sitting. There can't be that many people who've lived with Parkinson's Disease for over 20 years and still been willing to explain its effects with such verve and luminosity. What a dreadful affliction but what a riveting read --- in a strange way quite uplifting, I thought.
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on 17 December 2007
This is a brave little book that addresses a frightening progressive disease with a combination of common sense and infectious humour. Not only will it give comfort to fellow-sufferers but it will help those they encounter have a better understanding of what is going on with people who cannot, for the moment at least, explain themselves. Unlike Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Sarah Nock makes clear, doesn't involve losing one's marbles. Her book is the clearest evidence of that.
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on 28 October 2007
It has been so helpful in giving me insight into my mother's illness, which is otherwise quite incomprehensible from the outside. All to easy to dismiss the symptoms as shaking and stiffness without being able to imagine what those, and the host of other less obvious symptoms, feel like.
So glad to have humour and gorgeous metaphors to help me, and must be even even more important for the people with Parkinson's themselves.
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on 26 March 2009
I purchased this book about a person who has Parkinsons for a friend who suffers from the same condition.

She has found it to be comforting and informative. Reading about someone else experiencing the same feelings, symptoms and problems has confirmed to my friend that she is not alone in her suffering and at the same time has helped her formulate different ways of dealing with a PD life.

If you know someone with PD then consider buying this book for them.
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on 27 April 2010
What an entertaining little book of one woman's experience of Parkinson's disease. It is, indeed, exactly what it says it is, an inside view of how she lives with this difficult and impish disease and it is told with humour and compassion.
Written for the benefit of doctors and carers of Parkinson's patients, it shows that it is possible to laugh at yourself almost while crying but it also explains a lot about how these people might feel, giving real insight for those in the patient's circle.

My only criticism is that it is untranslateable - the upbeat tone would have been a wonderful tonic for the practical and negative attitude that Germanic countries seem to have towards this disease, but it is so quintessentially English middle-class that it would be impossible to translate it into anything like the original in another language. I would dearly love to have been able to read it to my father-in-law, who sees the diagnosis of this disease as a death sentence, but it would be utterly lost in translation...
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on 4 November 2007
The Foreword is by Professor Andrew Lees, a foremost specialist in the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, but the book is in no way a clinical study. What it tells you is what it is like to have the disease, but there are also plenty of practical tips - both medical and behavioural - on how to make the most of a condition that the sufferer is always aware is incurable and degenerative. The message is: Your body may be going downhill, but the spirit doesn't have to go with it, at least not all the time; and it pays to resist!
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on 11 May 2015
This is a lively personal story of an encounter with Parkinson's Disease. Once encountered it is a rest-of-life relationship which gets progressively more intense. It is a tragi-comic account of the effects of the condition on a person. The condition has a seeming infinite number and variety of its effects, and my experience has not (so far1) matched the author's, but beneath the glossy surface of the writing and excellent illustrations are the frustrations and determinations common to sufferers. What is the sufferer feeling when spectators can only see enough to draw so many wrong conclusions. If you have ever been frustrated by that person getting in the way of your speedy progress, or shaken your head dismissively at that person who seems under the influence of alcohol or is apparently incapable of looking happy, read this book and discover what it's like being that person.
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on 8 May 2013
I have sent it to many friends and family as it mirrored my own feelings and experiences so closely as I have Parkinsons as well.
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