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81 of 84 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All Of Alice
People tend to lump "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass (and What Alice Found There)" into one collection which has taken on the new title of "Alice in Wonderland". This is probably a product of the movies, which took bits and pieces from each and made a composite adventure. This was possible, because Lewis Carroll (a.k.a. Reverend Charles...
Published on 28 July 2009 by Dave_42

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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Signet Classic - Alice in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass
This edition is a good bargain at under £3; it includes the original Tenniel illustrations which give a great feel for the truly bizarre nature of Alice's journey. However, I have a few problems with its blurb, which for a start describes Alice as following a "hasty hare" underground, and spells "imaginitive", well, imaginatively. The essay by Martin Gardner is an okay...
Published on 4 Aug. 2010 by Kate


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maths in Alice in Wonderland, 28 April 2009
Apart from being a beautifully written children's story book it is also an intellectual book very cleverly put together.You can take from it whatever your imagination perceives.
As a primary school teacher it is one of my most important resources for mathematics and a treasured possession.
I use extracts from the book to teach number work throughout the whole of the two key stages. Mostly, I use it as an introduction to concepts and operations of number.In KS1 The cheshire cat delights children when I draw it on the board and use it in subtraction to show it "vanished quite slowly to the grin." This leads to investigative activities on subtraction and 'difference' and children are motivated to achieve the grin!
At KS2 fun can be had determining whether an operation has commutative properties by introducing the dormouse at the mad hatter's tea party and reciting his ideas of what is the same and what is not. "I breathe when I sleep" and "I sleep when I breathe." These little quotes lead to discussion about links with the four operations of number and children are very imaginative with their own ideas.
I could go on with all the other subtle links with mathematics and the funny distortions of the operations. "the different branches of arithmetic are,ambition,distraction,uglification and derision."
You can have fun finding out how many times the number two appears in the book and link all the stretching and reducing to different areas of maths and find out how lessons can lessen!
The whole purpose of the book was to entertain children and incite adults to look for the subtleties in the book. It is riddled with mathematical inferences. It's really quite brilliant.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kindle edition reviewed, 10 Mar. 2011
By 
Ivan Proctor (Gloucestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
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As with many classic texts there is a wealth of different editions of Alice available but of the ones for Kindle I looked at samples of this seemed to be the best in this price bracket. It is well laid out (including good formatting for the poems) and navigable to each chapter of both Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. It has a brief biographical introduction and is concluded by a bibliography. It is tempting to describe the edition as a simple 'no frills' edition but it is added to by the inclusion, as chapter headings, of some of Tenniel's original illustrations. When we picture Alice or the White Rabbit or the Mad Hatter or Humpty Dumpty in our minds it is usually Tenniel's pictures that we have so the inclusion of some of them here is a definite bonus. Kindle cannot come near producing illustrations as well as 'proper' books but as Tenniel's pictures are line illustrations they work quite well. Just simply a good copy of a classic text to add to your personal Kindle library.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthy edition of a fantastic book, 19 Feb. 2008
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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I loved this book as a child. I had the edition with the Tenniel drawings, which I loved, but which when I look at them now seem a little surreal. I tried to read Alice to my daughters in that version but they weren't impressed. They did however, love this version with its clear, modern drawings which still seem to encapsulate the magic of the text.

My only grumble is that this is a fairly large format book which is quite heavy, and my four year old has difficulty managing it when she wants to 'read' it for herself. Otherwise the words are clear, the illustrations are beautiful, and there are lots of them, and the quality of the book is wonderful. Something that you want to treasure and keep for your children's children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review of the Oxford World Classics Edition, 3 April 2013
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This is not a review of Carroll's writing, but a review of the Oxford World Classics edition thereof, in order that potential purchasers can gauge whether it will meet their needs. I do not have any other edition, so I cannot provide any comparative analysis.

Published in 2009, Oxford's edition of `Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and `Through the Looking-Glass' (1871) contains John Tenniel's original illustrations. In addition, there are the standard `Notes on the Text', a bibliography, as well as a brief chronology of Carroll's life and works. And there is an appendix containing `The Wasp in a Wig' which Carroll excised from the published version.

The text is copiously annotated by the editor, Peter Hunt, through the medium of endnotes. (I prefer footnotes, rather than having to move back and forth, but that's just my personal preference: casual readers may prefer the page unencumbered, which is the case here.) The endnotes seek to explain the context for much of Carroll's writing, but it is often a thankless task. But the attempt is worthy and makes this edition of value. There are forty pages of them, six pages of which consider the poem `Jabberwocky'. Hunt mentions how "it is (perhaps) surprising that so much scholarly ink has been spilt on interpreting genuine nonsense."

And then there is Hunt's thirty-six-page introduction. Here he addresses the issue of what exactly are the Alice books: "Are they harmless, innocent children's stories, simple fantasies with eccentric characters and nonsense verses? Or are they studies of Victorian female repression, stories that take place in nightmare worlds of repression and godlessness, allegories of Victorian and Oxford society, intricate textures of mathematical, philosophical and semantic puzzles, or symbolic explorations ... Or gifts of love (or possibly lust) from a frustrated academic to a young girl?"

Using commentary from Carroll's biographers, critics, and contemporaries, Hunt concisely addresses these issues. He does so through exploring Carroll's life, the origins of the books, his relationship with Alice, and how the Alice books conform (or otherwise) with contemporary Victorian children's literature.

In conclusion, I found the stories themselves worthy of only three stars (I quickly got bored), but the edition is worth four.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 9 Feb. 2010
By 
Picard (USS Enterprise) - See all my reviews
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It was nothing more than curiosity that made me purchase 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland', and funnily enough it was to be the running theme of the novel itself. I read as many concise reviews as I could - both before and after purchase - leaving me with perhaps more questions now than before I even opened the book. I'm confident enough to say that, on a literature scale, this book is massively over-rated as being 'one of the greatest novels ever'. I would never deny that people have happy memories of reading this at certain points of their life, but I feel sentiment can often over look quality.

The pre-face of the book doesn't state whether this novel contains actual grammatical errors (of which there are numerous), or whether this is the product of the old English language. I found many of the sentences too drawn out with constant "and"'s in the description, leaving little break to calculate what is happening. As such, I found it hard to read at times, though it would be unfair to say that I wasn't entertained. Despite the, admittedly, original writing style, I've never had the pleasure of reading such a random and fun book that doesn't, in any way, try attempt anything more than sheer curiosity. Alice is from the off-set presented as a young girl not through the images spread out on the pages, but through her innocence that can turn things like danger into what she would consider silly.

I can only come to terms that the novel has become such a cult hit because we can continue asking what Carroll was actually thinking when he wrote it. There have been suggestions that he 'liked' his Opium during the authorship (which wouldn't surprise me), but given that and despite its flaws, its still a tight story that at least highlights were no better in a world of confusion and non-sensical values.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unforgettable Alice, 27 Jan. 2008
By 
Arthur Crown (Heathrow, England) - See all my reviews
First published in 1865, Lewis Carroll's fascinating story has captured the imagination of succeeding generations and been the subject of a number of films and TV adaptations.

Lewis Carroll was the pen-name of Charles Dodgson, an Oxford mathematician and clergyman who came to know at least one real 'Alice', Alice Liddell, who was the child of a colleague.

Re-reading the book in adult life, it's still not clear to me whether it's a children's book for children, a children's book for adults or a slightly crazy attempt to explore the mind of a child through the reconstruction of a number of dreams.

It remains a fascinating work of fiction which certainly captures the spirit of a dreamlike state and puts together all kinds of wildly symbolic and often comic ideas in a disturbing and perplexing anarchy that, so far as I know, haunts our awakening hours throughout life.

Reading it as a child and later an adolescent, the book seemed to me to be a benchmark of my own development. If I could tell at which point Alice dropped off and entered the dream and begin to have some idea of what some of these weird experiences where about; I felt I was getting somewhere.

Now, I'm not so sure. Because, after all, Charles Dodgson was never a little girl. So was he trying to show us what he thought he had understood about the mind of a little girl ? Alice is certainly a very astute, mature and logical child, who is fiercely unaccepting of the thought process of others, while perfectly quick to adapt to the crazy situations in which she finds herself.

This book is a lasting treasure, why ever it was written and what ever it really contains.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Perfect introduction to a timeless classic., 3 May 2002
The wonder of Alice is that she and her friends appeal to all ages. It is the combination of adventure and curiousity in the Carroll stories that stirs the imagination of any reader.
This colouring book is an ideal introduction to the younger reader who merely wants to become acquainted with the characters. However, as an older reader and collector of all things 'Alice' the attractive pictures in this book are more than worthy of a place on my bedroom wall.
A must for anyone who loves Alice.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless, 12 April 2000
By 
Mr. A. Pomeroy (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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An utterly timeless book that has been, at various times, an amusing children's book, a psychedelic text to rival 'Lord of the Rings', and a bible for enthusiastic young programmers who are bored of cyberpunk. It remains a striking record of a repressed imagination suddenly untethered, and the lively writing style hasn't dated - it presents the strange world of Wonderland simply and effectively.
Meanwhile, John Tenniel's illustrations are definitive, and similarly timeless - abstract fantasy doesn't date, and the few pieces that seem old-fashioned might as well be modern illustrations with a Victorian design brief.
The sequel, 'Alice Through the Looking-Glass' seems slightly darker, has a complex chess theme, and includes the famous 'Jabberwocky' poem, something which a certain type of precocious teenager will memorise and recite at parties.
"And what is the use of a book without pictures or conversation?" might as well be a motto for the internet, too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must of English culture, 10 Oct. 2009
By 
Mrs. Marie E. W. Ebbesen (Ibiza, Spain) - See all my reviews
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I was delighted that it had the original drawings by Tenniel---very important. I bought it for my grown-up grandchildren who to my dismay had never read it, and explained to them that it was important as they would hear quotes of it in speeches or articles and even in Parliament. Curiouser and curiouser, certain aspects even relate to what we are learning about space, time and the universe today, such as the Red Queen and Alice running as fast as they could and yet are still in the same place!!! But then Lewis Carroll was a mathematician, as well as a writer.
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I have to say my daugter agrees with Alice..., 21 Jan. 2005
if there are no pictures it's not an interesting book ;o) Thandfully this edition of Alice has the most wonderful pictures! Detailed enough to help my nearly 4 year old recount teh chapter she has just heard with no prompts from me. However, that's not why it gets 5 stars from me, the real bunus to me was that it is printed onto cream paper with clear space between the lines of text making it much easier on this tired mummy's eyes at the end of the day :o)
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