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8 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars Foundation of economics
Seems a bit silly for a mere mortal to be reviewing this book, but Amazon insist on it ! The content is way above my pay scale, but certainly the download was swift and the typsetting so far seems faultless, and the price of £0.00 was perfect.
Published 11 months ago by Kevin Palfreeman

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3.0 out of 5 stars Heavy Going
I have to agree with other buyers of books that are available for free.There is no contents list so finding your way around is difficult in what is after all a reference book and there seem to be many spelling mistakes and glitches with the layout. A small cover price for a better edition is probably worth the investment. But at least it is all here including book V on...
Published on 19 Aug. 2012 by Exiledowl


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4.0 out of 5 stars I should have been made to read this at the ..., 5 July 2014
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
I should have been made to read this at the age of 15. I wouldn't have had to learn the hard way then.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Foundation of economics, 20 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
Seems a bit silly for a mere mortal to be reviewing this book, but Amazon insist on it ! The content is way above my pay scale, but certainly the download was swift and the typsetting so far seems faultless, and the price of £0.00 was perfect.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A true classic!, 13 Jan. 2014
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Les Ashton (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
I was fed up reading other books and newspaper articles where Adam Smith was quoted, such that I was compelled to read this.
Although the language used in the book is challenging, Adam Smith talks common sense. The concepts he discussed, for me, showed he was ahead of his time. Whilst he is often described as 'the father of economics', which I believe to be true, through his writing the reader gets a sense of the history and politics which existed in his time. I would suggest that you keep a
Dictionary to hand, and internet access, such as, Wikipedia, as some of the language is archaic, e.g. "Shewn" instead of "shown'"
Well worth reading if you would like to learn we're the principles of modern day capitalism originated from. A true classic.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Heavy Going, 19 Aug. 2012
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
I have to agree with other buyers of books that are available for free.There is no contents list so finding your way around is difficult in what is after all a reference book and there seem to be many spelling mistakes and glitches with the layout. A small cover price for a better edition is probably worth the investment. But at least it is all here including book V on taxation.The book is heavy going being written in the language of 1775 and Adam Smith's style could not be described as succinct. It is still surprising that nearly 240 years after it was written much of the text is still relevant once you get your head around bushels etc. and pounds, shillings and pence. Hard work but worth it in the end.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The inventor of modern capitalism explains why it works and what the inevitable downside will be., 23 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
Capitalism as explained by its guiding light. A moral philosopher who understood the benefits and problems that would arise as humans became simply a part of the means of production (as Marx would have it). Sadly his name has ben hijacked by right wingers but I think he would be appalled at this as his analysis is far deeper than the current bunch of monetarist apologists who are little more than supporters of the robber barons.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not read it yet, 3 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
I read this book many years ago and bought the digital edition to be able to dip into it on my kindle. It looks complete but I haven't been able to look at it in detail yet.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 28 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
Thanks!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Only for specialists, 6 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Kindle Edition)
Adam Smith's "Wealth of Nations" is really only for those interested in the history of Economic Thought. A reviewer contemporary to Smith described it as "verbose and repetitive" with some justice. Nevertheless, Smith's knowledge of current industrial, commercial and financial activities of his day and, indeed, the past history of those aspects from the late 17th century, is impressive. His discussion of coin and paper money is interesting to us because conditions in his day were so different to ours. Coins contained enough metal to make their intrinsic cost of production close to the value of things they could buy. Nowadays the cost of our coinage is way below its purchasing power over goods and services. Paper money was in very large denominations compared with today. The £10 note, for example, was roughly the same as the probable annual wage of working people at that time . Even 100 years after Smith wrote the average wage was around £15 per annum and an army NCO retiring on £25 per annum was an aristocrat of labour.

One curious thing: Smith often refers when making comparisons to "Europe" as if that were a political entity at that time. Perhaps, to him, the practices of France, the German princely states and the Netherlands seemed very similar.
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