Customer Reviews


240 Reviews
5 star:
 (144)
4 star:
 (51)
3 star:
 (25)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (13)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply beautiful
Upon starting to read this book I was somewhat unsure as to how much I would enjoy it, as I believed I knew the ending thanks to an episode of Friends. However, what I knew went no way towards spoiling my enjoyment of the story. I was taken on an emotional journey, ranging from sheer delight to complete sorrow. I grew to love and care for the characters and felt...
Published 7 months ago by Marcia McSwegan

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Free but bad
I downloaded this free book for an OU course. It's full of typos, including words that don't fit. I'd say there is a typo on every page. It irritates as you read and is v poor for study purposes. Give it a miss.
Published 16 months ago by Mrs. Sylvia Warhurst


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Free but bad, 10 Nov. 2013
By 
Mrs. Sylvia Warhurst (Harrogate, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
I downloaded this free book for an OU course. It's full of typos, including words that don't fit. I'd say there is a typo on every page. It irritates as you read and is v poor for study purposes. Give it a miss.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply beautiful, 18 Aug. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
Upon starting to read this book I was somewhat unsure as to how much I would enjoy it, as I believed I knew the ending thanks to an episode of Friends. However, what I knew went no way towards spoiling my enjoyment of the story. I was taken on an emotional journey, ranging from sheer delight to complete sorrow. I grew to love and care for the characters and felt heartbroken at their misfortunes and joyous at their triumphs. Whilst being slightly old fashioned in places, I still found myself relating to the characters. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would happily recommend it to anyone as it was, in my opinion, very worthy of its status as a classic. A top read and I look forward to reading the sequels which I have downloaded already!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless, 27 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
Since my grandmother gave me my first copy of this book, over the years I have read it countless times and still never tire of the pleasure it brings me each time I open its pages
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars From Little Women to Good Wives, 12 Jan. 2015
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
Louisa May Alcott wrote many books, from her "blood and thunder" tales to heartwarming novels about teens growing up.

But there's something special about "Little Women," a fictionalized account of her own family's growing pins. Thewarmly realistic stories, sense of comedy and tragedy, and insights into human nature make the romance, humor and fun little anecdotes of "Little Women" come alive.

The four March girls -- practical Meg, rambunctious Jo, sweet Beth and childish artist Amy -- live in genteel New England poverty with their Marmee, while their father is away in the Civil War. The girls don't let lack of money hamper their fun and happiness. But their world starts to expand when Jo befriends "poor little rich boy" Laurie, and soon he and his tutor are almost a part of their family.

Along with him, the girls encounter many of the bumps of growing up -- the destruction of Jo's treasured writing, romps with wealthier pals, Amy's expulsion from school, and Meg's reluctant first romance. But their lives are turned upside-down when Beth contracts scarlet fever, and they receive news that their father has been seriously injured -- and these crises threaten to destroy the heart of their family.

The second half of the book opens with Meg's wedding -- if not to her dream guy, then to her love. But while time has mellowed and matured the Little Women, it hasn't lessened the capacity for conflict and unintentional comedy -- particularly with the now-attractive Amy, whose attempts to pursue art, culture and the appearance of wealthy sophistication usually go horribly wrong.

But the platonic friendship between Laurie and Jo is shattered when he admits his true feelings to her... and gets rejected. Distraught, he goes to Europe, as does Amy with crusty old Aunt March. And left in New England, Jo is faced with the question of what her life has in store, despite Beth's picturesquely poor health. Her new job as a governess leads her to put her treasured stories into print... leading her to love and her future.

There's a clearly autobiographical tone to "Little Women" -- and since the March girls really are like the girls next door, this doesn't exactly come as a shock. How much of it is real? A passage late in the book portrays a post-"blood and thunder" Alcott -- in the form of Jo -- "scribbling" down the book itself, and getting it published because it feels so real and true.

And it does. Alcott's writing is a warm, smooth string of interconnected stories, some of them quiet and some peppered with silly jokes, moments of tragedy, poetry, and unintentional humiliation ("Salt instead of sugar. And the cream is sour"). Sometimes, especially in the beginning, Alcott is a bit too preachy and hamhanded. But her touch becomes defter as she writes on.

The best part of this book is the March girls themselves -- they have flaws and strengths, ambitions and dreams that never quite turn out as they expect. And their misadventures -- like Amy's embarrassing problem with her huge lobster, or Meg's makeover at a rich friend's house -- have the feeling of authenticity.

Lovable Jo is the quintessential tomboy -- rough, gawky, fun-loving, impulsive, with a love of literature and a mouth that is slightly too big. Meg's love of luxury adds a flaw to the "perfect little homemaker" image, and while Amy is an annoying little brat throughout much of the first half of the book, by her teens she's almost as likable as Jo.

It must be admitted that Beth is not quite as endearing -- she's canonized with the 19th-century approach to the deceased, and so is continuously sweet, loving and understanding. But Laurie makes up for this: a wealthy, artistic, passionate young man who goes through all the growing pains, as he tries to be worthy of the girl he adores. Don't worry, things turn out all right for him.

"Little Women" is one of those rare classic novels that is still relevant, funny, fresh and heartbreaking today. The March family will come alive, and never quite leave.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Read at the wrong time?, 20 Sept. 2014
By 
Lucybird (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
Lots of people love Little Women, don’t they? I think maybe I read it at the wrong time. I should have read it when I was younger maybe. I can see myself liking it around he time I read A Little Princess, and The Secret Garden, and all the Noel Streatfield books. It has a similar tone. As an adult though, I didn’t like it so much.

It struck me as being a little preachy to be honest. I get the idea of good role models and having a moral story- it’s even addressed within the book, however it’s almost too perfect, even as they have their own struggles with things they find hard the girls never really seem to need redeeming.

The characters were too set in their ways. The idea of Beth always being perfect, and Amy always a little vain, and Jo with her boys. There was no real depth there a lot of the time.

Looking at Alcott’s life it seems that it is very much based on herself and her sisters (her being Jo, of course). Maybe this is why Jo seemed like the most defined character, because Alcott could see into her own head, but not into that of her sisters.

Whenever I think about this book I think about the episode of Friends where Joey and Rachel read each others favourite books, Rachel’s being Little Women, and Joey’s habit of hiding books in the freezer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good book but too sentimental, 27 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
This book is quite well written and at times has a lot of tension. However, it was just not realistic because it rather resembled a fairy story, with a happy ending. In real life I don't think this kind of thing happens often although I am not saying it doesn't happen at all. But overall I liked it because it was interesting to see how Louisa May Alcott portrayed women and how she thought that they should act.
I think its a shame that the language is so old fashioned because i would have recommended it to younger readers if the language used wasn't slightly too hard to understand for young children. I think that children would probably enjoy the story more than adults, although of course adults can still read it and enjoy the story. This book is good to read before bed because it doesn't have any frightening or scary parts, and altogether it is quite relaxing to read as it doesn't have you sitting on the edge of a seat biting your nails because you're so scared or because it's so tense.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful book, 4 Aug. 2014
By 
Nanto (Chester UK) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
I first read this book 53years ago when I was 11. I've always remembered the March girls, they left an impression on me then, especially Jo and Beth. The story about a loving close family brings fond personal memories for me, especially as I remember reading this book when my own close family had hopes and dreams of a promising future. Sadly most of them are no longer here with us but the loving memories remain and reading this book has been a wonderful, happy trip down memory lane. Louisa May Alcott tells her story charmingly. Her description of each character comes to life in your imagination and more fascinating is her descriptions of Amy's trip around Europe and how life in the is continent was at her time of writing.
I'm so pleased to have rediscovered LMA and intend to move onto Good Wives next.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars On the dull side..., 7 Sept. 2014
By 
Essex Girl (Essex (yes, really)) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
On the plus side, this book is well written and the characterisation is clear. Apparently it was also groundbreaking for its time, dealing as it did with women working and so on.

However... Some books aimed at children and teenagers can be read with pleasure by adults (most of the output of Rosemary Sutcliffe, for example). This book is just not in that league. It's dull, it's repetitive, and it can be very sugary - it's implausibly low on sisterly dust-ups, or fallings-out with parents. Reprimanded girls don't shout and rebel in Alcott's world, they clap their hands together and cry, 'Oh, Marmee, now I understand my failings! I will endeavour to improve myself! Please forgive me!'

I'm really not quite sure how it came to be regarded as a classic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book full of life lessons, 13 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
This was my grandmother's favourite book, and after reading it again since I was 8, I can appreciate all of the lessons given in the book. My grandma truely was Mrs March and I learnt so much from her words and example. Reading Little Women was like having my grandma again teaching me all of life's important lessons on character and living a happy life. Such a wonderful book that will bring you immense happiness and satisfaction, and make you more grateful for life's little pleasures. I am so grateful for my grandma for introducing me to this book, so now whenever I miss her and need words of advice or encouragement, I shall read Little Women and imagine her teaching me all those principles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful story, 3 July 2014
By 
Aletheuon (Wales UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Little Women (Kindle Edition)
This really is a delightful and much-loved story. Originally published in the US two parts in 1868 and 1869, 'Little Women' and its sequels follow the lives of four sisters--Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. It is a fictionalised version of the lives of Louisa Alcott and her three sisters. The author had a hard struggle in life, for her father was an impractical idealist who could not support his family and she had to work from early on in her life. She was an abolitionist and feminist who never married, although she had a romance with a Polish man who is thought to have been the model for Laurie in 'Little Women.'
In certain ways, the book was innovative and even revolutionary in its time, intertwining the themes of domesticity, love and work and showing that all of them are necessary for a girl to find her true identity. Women then led very restricted lives. It has been said that Louisa May Alcott created the vision of the 'all-American girl'. The title refers to the fact that these March sisters were no longer children and not yet fully women; they were 'little women.'
There is a beautiful and wholesome morality in these stories, where virtue is more important than wealth and creativity more important than success, yet both reasonable wealth and success are shown as desirable for a secure and contented life. It is about God and goodness and self-sacrifice - all pretty un-PC today. Obviously, it is a period piece - it was published in the nineteenth century - but much of its charm is the period setting. It is sentimental. Americans are not afraid of sentimentality; it is we Brits we are too cynical and world-weary to enjoy it. There may be an element of wishful thinking in it, but its central characters are certainly not without flaws and they have to learn to cope in a world which is difficult for a woman to negotiate. On the whole, they do it well and they retain their integrity.
This was a tremendous success when it was published and it has been successful ever since, beloved by generations of women and a few men, too. I first read it about sixty years ago and I still love it. Then, it gave me something my own upbringing did not give me - a sense of the importance of family and love and working together and of the lasting values of life and religion. Now, it reminds me not to get too cynical, because those old values have not changed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Little Women
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
£0.00
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews