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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is L.M Montgomery's most touching book
Rilla of Ingleside continues the adventures of Anne's children, the youngest, Rilla is left at home whilst her brothers go to fight in WW1. The book is sensitive and moving, portraying the feelings of the young girl and her family left behind in Prince Edward Island. If you liked the other "Anne" books then this one is a must, although it is much more sombre...
Published on 18 May 2002

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3.0 out of 5 stars The last in the series of the Avonlea Books
I recently re-read all of the Anne of Avonlea books. I loved them as a child and wanted to re-visit them. This book is the last of the series. As an adult I found it a bit slow moving, but it did enjoy it.
Published 9 months ago by Debbie Jarratt


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is L.M Montgomery's most touching book, 18 May 2002
By A Customer
Rilla of Ingleside continues the adventures of Anne's children, the youngest, Rilla is left at home whilst her brothers go to fight in WW1. The book is sensitive and moving, portraying the feelings of the young girl and her family left behind in Prince Edward Island. If you liked the other "Anne" books then this one is a must, although it is much more sombre than the others, I believe that it is the best, and you won't want to put it down!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the serie, 19 Oct 2003
Rilla of Ingleside is my favorite of the Anne of Green Gables serie. Although I can't really say it belongs to the serie. It's different, mainly because the main caracter, Rilla, is so different from her mother, Anne Shirley and because the subject is far more realistic then the other books who seem to belong to another world, that is why I consider Rilla of Ingleside to be at the same time the best of the serie and also apart from it. It shows how hard it was for women to stay home while their husband, sweetheart, son or brother were fighting.
I recommend this book, not only to fans of Anne Shirley but also to anybody who wants to cry, laugh and smile.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The final novel in the story of Anne Shirley and her family, 11 July 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
It is certainly hard to begin reading "Rilla of Ingleside," knowing it is the eighth and final book in the Anne of Green Gables series. The focus is on Rilla, born Bertha Marilla Blythe, the youngest of Anne's daughters, who is named for Anne Shirley's mother and the woman who took her in at Green Gables as a redheaded orphan. As the novel begins Rilla is fifteen years old and still looking forward to her first romance. But the novel takes a dramatic turn as the shadow of the First World War reaches all the way to Ingleside and sends a grief stricken Mrs. Blythe to her bed, but also a wonderful moment when Rilla sees her mother with eyes shinning and looking like a young girl.
American involvement in that war was relatively brief, compared to what was happening with the rest of the world, so what I found fascinating is to see that war from the Canadian perspective, as it drags on year after year. "Rilla of Ingleside" was published in 1921, which means that L. M. Montgomery provided a contemporaneous account of the war as seen from the Canadian home front. Two of Anne's children, Jem and Walter, as well as Rilla's beau Kenneth Ford, head off to France, where they suffer as all young men suffer in wars. But we learn of all this second-hand as we see the impact of the war on the mothers, sisters and girls who were left behind to worry about Paris being shelled by the Germans along with the fate of the Empire and their loved ones.
This gives "Rilla of Ingleside" an emotional depth unmatched in Montgomery's work by virtue of the fact we are talking about life and death in a world at war. While this might be a bit sobering for younger readers, by the time they get to this final novel in the "Anne of Green Gables" series I believe they will be well prepared; after all, the previous volume "Rainbow Valley," was actually written after "Rilla," which allows Montgomery to provide appropriate foreshadowing. There are certainly comic aspects to the story, mostly involving Susan Baker, the Blythe family cook who keeps getting marriage proposals during the war, but this an emotional tale where the key figure ends up being Little Dog Monday, waiting at the Glen St. Mary for Jem Blythe to come home. All in all, this is a most satisfying if unexpected conclusion to the story of Anne Shirley and her family.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book; I couldn't put it down!, 28 Dec 1998
By A Customer
I had read the first seven books of the Anne of Green Gables series. The fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh books were gradually getting more and more boring, but I decided to read on. Rilla of Ingleside is by far the best of the series. I rarely feel emotion over books, but this one positively sent chills up my spine-especially the chapter entitled "And So, Goodnight". This book was happy, sad, joyful, and tragic all at once. In this book, the author describes Kenneth Ford's love letters to Rilla as "never growing flat or insipid with ever so many scores of readings". That's how I'd describe this book. This is a must-read, especially for girls about to undergo the change from child to woman. Happy reading! =)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book in the world!!!!!!!!!!!!, 13 Feb 2008
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sceptical (Southampton, Hants United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This story is so wonderful! The best book I have read, infact I got told off in class for reading it and not one of the books from the class bookcase!

Anne's three sons go off to fight in WW1, one of them never to come back.Though I love all the Anne books I think Anne's childhood was a bit to fairytale like. This is totaly different. Rilla seems so real to me.

I think everybody should read this book, it describes WW1 so well. A must for all Anne fans.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars READ THIS BOOK!!!, 8 Dec 2001
By A Customer
I think that this book is one of the best in the Anne series coming a close second to Anne of the Island. It has everything a good book needs - strong believeable characters, tragedy and a little romance. But the best thing about this book is that you'll never be the same after reading it. It makes you question yourself as to whether you would be strong enough to cope with the consequences of war as well as Rilla, Anne and Susan did.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very moving, 2 Feb 2010
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I have been staggered at the skill with which Montgomery is able to reveal and develop her characters . In this final book of the Anne series, Rilla begins as a vain and shallow creature, but the writer so subtly brings her through the horrors of WW1 and turns her into a grounded, responsible and of course beautiful young woman. The courage of the women displayed as they wait so patiently for their men to return from the Front is an enormous challenge to our instant culture today.
This book has moved me more than any other in the series. I have always shied away from War stories, but being hooked on Anne I had to read it. Montgomery has brought me face to face with the realities of war from a woman's perspective. My admiration for them now is beyond measure.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A touching book, one of the best of the series., 24 April 2002
By A Customer
I have read every one of the "Anne of Green Gables" Series, and even though all are amazing, this is one of my favorites! It moved me deeply and it will probably move you to. The setting is WWI, and Rilla, Anne's youngest daughter has to face the hardships of war. When, her loved ones go off to fight on the Western Front, Rilla is there in the Glen raising a war-baby, organizing the Junior Red Cross, but most of all, having faith! It made me cry, but a happy feeling, too! Rilla wiil never been the same, and either will I!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly moving, 29 Aug 2001
By A Customer
Rilla of Ingleside concludes the Anne of Green Gables series. Whilst it is a must for readers of the other Anne books it can also stand alone as an excellent book in it's own right. I defy even the most hardhearted not to cry when reading it and the story is made even more poignant by the fact that real people found themselves in these situations during the First World War. The tragedy is nicely tempered by comedy, mainly provided by Susan and Rilla becomes a character whom the reader really cares about as the book progresses. I sometimes regret the fact that we don't hear more from the other members of the Ingleside family but I think that the book would lose it's intensity if that were the case. A book I will still be reading years from now.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great insight into the impact of World War I on Canadian lives, 23 July 2010
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This review is from: Rilla of Ingleside (Paperback)
Like many teenage girls, I loved the "Anne" series, and read the first six repeatedly for several years. L. M. Montgomery knew just how to appeal to and inspire girls in this age group. I didn't realise "Rainbow Valley" or "Rilla of Ingleside" existed until I found copies of them in my school library in the late 1980s, and managed to read bits of them when I should have been studying - I never managed to read them all the way through as our strict librarian would come round and check on us! There were always books in the other six of the series that I liked more than others, though - for instance I never liked "Anne of Avonlea", "Anne of Windy Willows" or "Anne of Ingleside" so much as the other three - I felt that there was too much incidental gossip about unimportant characters in them. I'm now 38 and since I had wanted to read the other two books as a teenager, I recently ordered them and read them. I have to admit I skimmed "Rilla of Ingleside" (and "Rainbow Valley"), because these days I feel even more than I did then that L. M. Montgomery does write quite a lot of trivial village gossip - but on the other hand, I found the insights into Canadian families sending their sons, husbands and brothers off to fight in World War I extremely moving and well written. The descriptions of the anguish suffered by Rilla's family, as presumably being typical of so many families in Canada and in many other countries at that time, are sad and made me think how lucky I am not to have lived through such a traumatic period in history. I enjoyed the parts concerning Rilla's war baby, also. I have to agree with another reviewer that I think it's a shame that Anne is always called Mrs Blythe in this book, and I also feel that I would have liked to know a bit more about how she and Gilbert and their other children felt about things and how they coped. It's almost as if the author felt that there was no more to say about Anne and Gilbert. Someone else on here commented that Gilbert becomes a sort of model husband without much personality once he and Anne are married, and that they missed the mischievous boy from Avonlea. I feel that way too; and I would have liked to hear more about Leslie, and Philippa, and Diana, and Anne's other old friends. The book is focussed on Rilla, who is a likeable character, but for me Anne is far more interesting. Perhaps it's just that I should have read it when I was younger, however - then it would have had sentimental value for me!
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Rilla of Ingleside (Anne of Green Gables Book 8)
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