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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars better than the "Da Vinci Code"
I grew up reading the Enid Blyton's Famous Five, Secret Seven, and "Adventure" books, along side Franklin Dixon's Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew Mysteries (Dixon's real name was Edward Stratemeyer but the books were ghost written). This reminds me of the best of these stories.

This has an interesting mix of fact and fiction and has been called the Da Vinci Code for...
Published on 14 Nov. 2012 by Su

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for slightly older kids
I got this book for my 9 year old son. When asked on his thoughts his comments were "it's alright". We started it off and I have been encouraging him to finish it but he seems to have lost a bit of interest. I think it would be more suitable for the 10 to 13 age range. That being said it is nicely written with some illustrations to help with the puzzles and has a...
Published on 5 May 2013 by Mr. I. A. Macpherson


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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars better than the "Da Vinci Code", 14 Nov. 2012
By 
Su (England) - See all my reviews
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I grew up reading the Enid Blyton's Famous Five, Secret Seven, and "Adventure" books, along side Franklin Dixon's Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew Mysteries (Dixon's real name was Edward Stratemeyer but the books were ghost written). This reminds me of the best of these stories.

This has an interesting mix of fact and fiction and has been called the Da Vinci Code for kids, but I think it's much better than that. There were times in reading the Da Vinci Code that my will to continue was tested almost to breaking, whereas here the story runs at a great pace and holds the interest.

It is meant for Young Adult readers but, as an adult, I thoroughly enjoyed it too, so much so I have already put the new one The Orphan of the Flames in my "basket".
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for slightly older kids, 5 May 2013
By 
Mr. I. A. Macpherson "Macca" (Leamington Spa, Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
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I got this book for my 9 year old son. When asked on his thoughts his comments were "it's alright". We started it off and I have been encouraging him to finish it but he seems to have lost a bit of interest. I think it would be more suitable for the 10 to 13 age range. That being said it is nicely written with some illustrations to help with the puzzles and has a decent pace. Add a star if your kids like mystery puzzle stories and are around 11 years old.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read for kids who like adventures, 1 Sept. 2012
It is really good and interesting. I can't stop reading it. it is good for children aged 8 - 10. - my son, aged 8
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Come break the code!, 16 April 2013
By 
G. Wylie "george11171" (Scottish Highlands) - See all my reviews
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A brilliantly conceived mystery plot involving real locations, and mysteries, both old and new, with danger always lurking about in the shadows. The tale not only introduces simple, but complex clues, with intriguing maps and diagrams, but actively succeeds in involving the young reader in attempting to reach a solution. What I found most delightful is that it easily managed to involve a much older reader in the quest too!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great to read as you solve the clues, 17 Sept. 2013
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EllyBlue (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Secret Breakers is the kind of book that really makes you think as you solve clues along the way. It is a good book because you are able to try and work out the codes and ciphers as you read.
Brody Bray is a girl who lives with her Grandad as her parents aren't there any more. Brody gets told to go to a museum which is in fact a code cracking school which is so secret that even the government doesn't know of its existence. Brody and her friends uncover the case of Professor Vande Seccer. But they don't know someone is out to get them.
I would recommend this book for 10-13 year olds as even though the storyline is fairly simple, it is also very confusing in parts. If you like codes or secret agents in your stories, you will enjoy this.
Review by my 11 year old daughter! (She loved it!)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unlocking the Truth is Fun & Puzzling - The Power of Three Secret Breakers, 25 Sept. 2012
By 
Alessi Lover "C.A.D." (Knightley UK) - See all my reviews
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Spy's, clues and secret manuscripts, sounds fun and believe me it is. Unlocking the truth in this book is fun.

I ordered this for our eleven year old son but ended up reading it myself first.

An exciting mystery book that once you start off reading you find it hard to it down.

The puzzles throughout the book are fun and the writing good so much so I will be ordering the next book The Orphan of the Flames.

There is a website which son is going to go on and see about the real life bits that are in the book as he thinks that part sounds fun.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Tantalising Glimpse into the World of Code Breaking, 1 Dec. 2012
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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The blurb on the book cover describes this as a kind of Da Vinci Code for kids. I think it's a fair summary myself. The book is a pleasing mix of fact and fiction mixing real life codes and code breaking ideas and schemes with fictional characters. Three children are drawn together by a secret association that is working on cracking a centuries old code - The Voynich Code. Others have tried and failed, but the children, all relations of previous code crackers, bring new life and new eyes to the search. The book is set mainly in Bletchley Park, a real place where real code crackers were gathered together by Winston Churchill in WWII to work on things like the Enigma code.

As an adult I found the book rather frustrating as there are numerous plot holes and gaps which have to be there for the characters of the children to do what they do, but which are glaringly obvious if you are a grown up. Through the eyes of a child however, these things will not be at all obvious and the book is pleasingly accessible, and provides an entry level access to anyone interested in codes and mysteries. As a librarian in a primary school I am always looking out for books which the children can engage with, and this book was recommended to me by one of our pupils as his favourite book. He has read and reread it countless times, and his enthusiasm for it is infectious. I will definitely be getting a copy for our library.

I would recommend this for children between the ages of eight and twelve. It is too complex for any younger readers unless they are very precocious, and probably too simplistic for older children, but perfect for the 8-12 market.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Adventure and puzzles all in one place, 23 Aug. 2012
By 
Ren (Newcastle, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Secret Breakers reminded me very much of the writing styles of books I used to read as a child, The Hardy Boys, The Three Investigators. Books that were perfectly suited to the age group, they didn't patronize the young reader, but they didn't over stretch them either. No swearing, nothing unpleasant and an intriguing mystery that the reader gets to try and solve alongside the characters.

In 1912 an encoded manuscript was found in a castle in Italy. In 1944 a group of code breakers formed a study group to decode the manuscript. They failed and in 1962 the group was reformed, again without success. Now the descendants of those study groups have been invited to join a secret school of code breaking in the hopes of making a third attempt to discover the secrets of the manuscript.

Aimed at children (probably 8 and up) the book has a good blend of fact and fiction, blurred together so masterfully that it's hard to be certain what is actual fact and what elements the author has created herself.

I enjoyed the book and read it from cover to cover in one sitting, I particularly liked all the sketches and notes taken from the main character, Brodie Bray's notebook, allowing the reader to feel they were taking part in the secret code breaking classes. As a childrens book, it did fall into one or two traps, some of the characters weren't as 3-dimensional as they perhaps could have been, and then there's always the characters who spend half their time bickering before deciding they like, or at least tolerate each other really. But for a reader in the correct age group I doubt any of that will matter. All they will see is an entertaining story with a good mystery to solve and written in such a way that they can try and solve it themselves.

Entertaining, enjoyable and even as a non-child, I'm also polishing up my code breaking skills whilst waiting for the next book in the series to see what happens next.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, 15 Nov. 2012
By 
Cambridge Ian (Cambridge UK) - See all my reviews
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First up - "Da Vinci Code for kids"! - this is better written in my opinion (having read the first 30 odd pages) and my 13yo son (who has devoured it) who really really enjoyed it.

I've seen an earlier review that drew a parallel with the hardy boys mysteries which is pretty close - loved those when I was a kid - and this is in the same mould.

My son is a prolific reader and him saying this was good is high praise indeed.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable start to a new series, 25 Feb. 2013
By 
E. Heckingbottom "elaineheck143" (U.K.) - See all my reviews
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The billing of 'The Da Vinci Code for Kids' is rather deceptive. This is more like 'Enigma for Youngsters.' I don't say this to denegrate the book - rather, to push it, because I have to say I really enjoyed it ... so much so that I bought book 2 on my Kindle and have already pre-ordered teh third book in the series!

MS408 is an unreadable book. It has been written in a code that even former members of the WWII Bletchley Park code breakers could not solve. Over the years, many experienced code breakers have tried ... and failed. Some have been driven insane; others have died. Is there a solution? Can the related code book ever be traced? What is to be done?

There is only one possibility - co-opting a new team of 3 ... children into a new school, Pembroke College, to be based at Station X, otherwise known as Bletchley Park. On the curriculum, on top of the basic subjects, is a course on codes and ciphers. Can these children succeed where so many adults have failed? Can they solve the problem that is MS408?

The result is a fascinating series of books (of which this is the first) - a series of adventures which will keep you gripped and wanting more.

Highly recommended for youngsters aged 9 to 13 with adventurous and inquisitive minds - both boys and girls. This series would probably be enjoyed by those who have enjoyed Robert Muchamore's books - both Cherubs and Henderson's Boys; also by those who have been intrigued by the Kathy Reichs 'Virals' series; and lovers of either Nancy Drew or The Hardie Boys.
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