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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 15 Jun 2012
By 
Sean (NEWARK, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks (Kindle Edition)
I bought all the 'Target' Doctor Who novelizations when I was a kid. This was before the VCR so the only way to re-live Doctor Who was to read it in novel form. I can honestly say that it was the desire to read these stories that was my prime motivation to learn to read when I was in junior school.

I'm so glad these literary treasures are being released on the Kindle. I've bought all of them so far and will probably buy all the subsequent releases. My young son loves to have them read to him for his bedtime stories.

This story is a 3rd Doctor (Jon Pertwee) story about freedom fighters trying to stop a Dalek invasion. Its an excellent story and if you're a Who fan you won't fail to love it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future shock... Daleks on top, 10 May 2012
By 
Michael Finn (Blackburn, Lancashire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Resistance fighters travel back through time to try to prevent a future where humans are subjugated by heartless machine creatures. No I'm not talking about The Terminator. In 1972 The Day of the Daleks was one of my earliest memories of the show (The Daemons was the first). I was five years old and I had no clue what was happening regarding plot. All I knew was that it had Daleks (previously viewed through fingers in the Peter Cushing movies) and a lot of people waving guns around. But it was only two or three years later that I'd remedy the situation by first learning to read and then by getting my hands on the Target novelisation by Terrance Dicks. I was pretty enthralled with this one at the time and even without the nostalgia there's still plenty for the older me to appreciate. Terrance Dicks adapted Louis Marks' script with a lot of obvious enthusiasm to improve and embellish, from the opening extra scene describing a meeting of the downtrodden but undefeated human guerrilla fighters of the 22nd century, to the numerous action scenes getting a much needed injection of flash-bang-wallop. What results is a more atmospheric portrayal of the Dalek ruled future and the ruin of war ravaged humanity. The sequence from the serial where the Doctor tries to evade capture using a balloon wheeled trike that barely ever got to jogging pace, pursued by Ogrons trying not to look like they are running on the spot, is replaced by an unrecognisable all out Mad Max trike chase. Most of all I enjoyed the early scenes where the three guerrillas first appear in our time, not in the bright light of dawn but in the dead of night, with Ogrons in close pursuit, getting into a three way shoot out with UNIT troops while the Doctor helps himself to wine and cheese on his ghost vigil. The plot is just about completely unchanged but Dicks just gives it all a good polish, even reinstating a few scenes that were planned but never made it into the show due to production issues, most notably the bookended time anomaly gag where the Doctor and Jo meet themselves for the second time.
Original artwork , features on script to novel, Terrance Dicks, Louis Marks and a new introduction by Gary Russell.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back Through Time to the Day of the Daleks, 3 Aug 2014
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Terrance Dicks remains the unchallenged `President of the High Council' of classic `Doctor Who' novelisations, having over 60 to his name. `Day of the Daleks' was his second published and for me comes right at the top of the list.

On the superb DVD release of `Day of the Daleks' with its wonderful, updated Special Edition, documentary feature `The Cheating Memory' investigates why DVD producer Steve Broster remembered the on-screen story as looking so much better than it actually did. He wasn't the only one! I give credit for my `improved memory' of the show to this excellent novelisation, which created images in the imagination far better than the special effects of 1972 could achieve. Much more than a straightforward novelisation, it's an excellent science fiction novel in its own right, equally satisfying whether you know the `Who' pantheon backwards to 1963 or have never seen a single episode of the classic series.

I won't detail the story; probably you know it and if you are lucky enough to be coming to this story for the first time, you don't want `spoilers' because there is one massive plot twist that is part of this story's legendary status.

Suffice it to say that 200 years from now, after a series of terrible wars, Earth is in ruins and the remaining human population is ruled by Daleks and their bulky but very stupid servants, the Ogrons. Brave human resistance fighters from this future travel back two centuries through time, to `terminate' (to coin a phrase ...) the man they blame for starting the wars that lead to Dalek conquest. The Doctor gets involved and is more than willing to help, in a way that only a Time Lord can ...

Terrance Dicks catches the spirit of Louis Marks' fine script and expands on it with some great extra scenes and prose that stayed with me for decades. My cherished copy of the original `Target' book, with its bright tangerine spine and back cover (unique in the range for a plastic film overlay, always inclined to peel off!) unaccountably "vanished... disappeared into thin air... like a ghost..." decades ago so I was delighted to buy the new edition and read it again.

On this occasion my memory did NOT cheat, the extra scenes and phrases in the novel were just as good as I remembered ... Moni making his way across the wastelands of future Earth, UNIT troops skirmishing with Ogrons in the darkness, the menacing Black Dalek, Anat emerging from the tunnels just as dawn breaks "over the sea of rubble" and contemplating that success by the Doctor would mean "a new dawn for all of them". Dicks also neatly ties up some loose ends and explains (as well as anyone can) the time-travel ideas that underlie this story.

The new edition benefits from a foreword, and a `Between the Lines' essay highlighting the many expansions and some changes that Dicks made in the novelisation. Perhaps the most striking change is the one that the essay does *not* mention; the character of The Controller, chief human (under the Daleks) in Earth Sector One. On screen he is a confident silvered aristocrat, barely giving a hint that he has any doubts about his collaboration with the aliens oppressing humanity. In the novel we are able to hear his thoughts, see his self-knowledge from his first scene that he is "just another human. A slave, like all humans" and follow his growing self-doubt as the Doctor challenges his already guilty conscience. This makes his final decision less surprising, but makes a more satisfying character.

Reading this book again felt almost like travelling back in time to 1975 when I read it first - so perhaps the story could be true after all! For full effect, read this book (at least in spirit) by firelight in Austerly House on a dark, stormy night, joining the Doctor with some Stilton cheese and perhaps a glass of Burgundy. But watch out for time-travelling guerrillas and Ogrons if you do ... 5*
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks, 20 May 2013
UNIT is called in when an important diplomat is attacked in his own home - by a man who then vanishes into thin air. The Doctor and Jo spend a night in the 'haunted' house and meet the attackers - who have time-jumped back from the 22nd century in the hope of changing history.

Travelling forward in time, the Doctor and Jo find themselves trapped in a future world where humans are slaves and the Daleks have already invaded. Using their ape-like servants to Ogrons to maintain order, the Daleks are now the masters of Earth.

As the Doctor desperately works to discover what has happened to put history off-track, the Daleks plan a time-jump attack on the 20th century.

This novel is based on a Doctor Who story which was originally broadcast from 1 to 22 January 1972.

Featuring the Third Doctor as played by Jon Pertwee, with his companion Jo Grant and the UNIT organisation commanded by Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Daleks have their Day!, 2 Jan 2013
By 
R. Wood "ryecroftwood2" - See all my reviews
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Before videos came along, it was impossible to see certain episodes of your favourite TV shows. People watched an episode ONCE...and that was it. You would never see it again for (most likely) years, long before televised repeats, VHS releases or just taping off the telly.

Doctor Who was certainly not exempt from this back in the day. Fans who loved the old show were desperate to relive their favourite episodes, yet just couldn't. And that's when these novelizations (originally published by Target Books) came along.

Despite my feelings about novelizations, I can understand the point of these wonderful Doctor Who books (more so given the age they were first published in). And having had a chance to actually check this one out, I can safely say that Day of the Daleks is far more than just a straight-adaptation. Writer Terrance Dicks took the opportunity to expand upon Louis Marks' original multi-part episode through some absolutely brilliant prose.

The plot of the original TV serial focused on UNIT being called in to investigate reports of a failed assault on Sir Reginald Styles in his own home. Investigations from the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) and Jo Grant (Katy Manning) lead them to being captured by the attackers and accidentally time-travelling to the 22nd Century...where the Daleks have conquered the Earth.

Day of the Daleks itself is one of the most famous episodes in Doctor Who's history, as well as being one of the Daleks' most legendary exploits. The tale is multi-layered, intelligent, gripping and full of some really colourful characters and sub-plots. In this reprint of the Target novelization (under the BBC Books banner), Terrance Dicks inserts additional scenes that were cut from the original script/final broadcast due to time, as well as new changes to the dialogue/action to help refresh the plot for literary sake. The result is simply excellent, and it doesn't matter whether you've seen the televised serial on DVD, enjoyed reading this book as a kid, or haven't even heard of Day of the Daleks before. It all just works, thanks to Dicks' impeccable narrative.

The reprint is pretty much exactly how it was published back in 1974. The original typesetting, original font, Chris Achilleos' old illustrations; everything's here in its beautiful old glory. For the finishing touches on this 2012 edition, there's a brand new introduction from Doctor Who novelist Gary Russell (who reminisces about his own childhood experiences), "The Changing Face of Doctor Who" (which is a handy intro to the Third Doctor, UNIT and Jo Grant for new fans) & "About the Authors" supplied by Justin Richards, and finally "Between the Lines" (provided by Steve Tribe) to point out all the exact differences between the actual TV serial and its novelization. All this serves to make the experience one of great learning for new readers who wish to dive into Doctor Who's history, as well as remaining a splendid read for old fans.

Doctor Who: Day of the Daleks remains a fantastic story, as well as superb reading. Essential for all fans, including those who've been brought up watching the likes of David Tennant and Matt Smith. Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What can I say Im addicted, 17 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks (Kindle Edition)
I just love all Doctor Who and finding classic books is a geeks heaven, never disappoints lets your imagination run mad
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5.0 out of 5 stars Jon pertwee as doctor who, daleks what more could you ask for?, 27 April 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who and the Day of the Daleks (Kindle Edition)
I haven't seen the tv episodes of this particular story, but now, having read the kindle book in less than twenty four hours, I am really looking forward to getting the DVD. I really enjoyed this as it incorporates many of my favourite things about doctor who, (the third doctor, U.N.I.T, and daleks. I would recommend it to any doctor who fan, young or old, whether you grew up watching William hartnell or Matt Smith.
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