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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 26 November 2009
A good read, my father as a nineteen year old national serviceman took part in this battle serving with 1RUR.

He served with, and knew Lt.Potts, who actually saved his patrol from an ambush during this battle.

He recently stated to me after reading the book that people should be reminded that the Royal Ulster Rifles never gave any ground during this battle.

Whilst the emphasis focuses on the Glosters, please remember the major part other units had in this infamous battle.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Your book should carry a health warning Anyone inclined to PTS would be in danger of a relapse. You have put the battle into both historical and contemporary context. You have also dealt with some of the controversies with great skill. I admire the extent of your research to have produced such a marvellous book - so full of anecdotes at every level from Private to General.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 September 2014
Having had very little knowledge of the Korean War other than my father was saved from serving there by a toss of a coin, I was intrigued to see this book as a daily deal for the Kindle.
Having bought the book and read it in short order I was ashamed to admit that I knew nothing about this particular war save except watching MASH.
The account provided by Mr Salmon starts with an account of the start of the war and the geopolitics surrounding it. He then goes onto describe the organisation of the British 29th Brigade and some of the characters and personalities involved.
There then follows an account of the first contact with enemy forces at the batte of Happy Valley before the account of the battle of Imjin.
This is a very harrowing and personal account from a number of different perspectives and deals with all the units involved including a detatachment of the Belgian army. The only difficulty with any book of this type is trying to tell several different events occuring at the same time and maintaining a readable flow. Mr Salmon has achived this and has made the writing very easy to follow.
In the end I was filled with admiration at the courage and determination of the Britsih forces involved in this almost forgotten part of British Military history. Having realised that my entire knowledge of this conflict was learned, wrongly, from watching episodes of MASH as a teenager this book has inspired me to discover more about this war, thank you Mr Salmon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 September 2011
Writing a review for this book is difficult because of all the excellent reviews that have already been published, but this work is so good that I felt I had to add my review.

Andrew Salmon has drawn together a well researched, even-handed account of the Battle of the Imjin River. The narrative flows beautifully and draws the reader in from the very first sentence. It is well constructed and easy to follow, but crucially, the text is not "dumbed-down", it is geared to an intelligent reader who has a general knowledge of the war, but it does not assume the reader has an in-depth knowledge of the Korean war.

Another feature I liked about this book was the fact that the author does not denigrate the opposing forces. He recognises their strengths and weaknesses, and for want of a better expression, gives the Chinese forces their due. This kind of approach is refreshing and a pleasure to read. I also like the way he combines official records with personal accounts, some are heartfelt and some are quite amusing, but in all of them you get the sense of the famous British Tommy, although I should add in here that a contingent of Belgians were also on the Imjin and they acquitted themselves magnificently too. As someone who spent 13 years in the RAF I could identify with the soldier's reactions to the situation and the way they dealt with the increasingly desperate situation, sometimes through gallows humour, sometimes through quiet resignation, but in all cases with the highest degree of integrity, honour and courage.

This book deserves to be widely read. It is a crying shame that the Korean War is the Forgotten War, and I think this book goes a long way to reversing this. It brings to the fore the courage and tenacity of the soldiers of both sides, it educates without patronising and most of all it makes you understand why we owe the veterans of this war the respect and recognition they deserve. I would recommend this book wholeheartedly and hope it gets the high level of readership it so richly deserves.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 May 2013
A superb book which details the endurance, suffering and shear determination of British soldiers. If you want to read the story of the 29th Brigade and their epic stand, with Belgian comrades, against a human wave of brave and experienced Chinese soldiers this is the book for you. It's the story of men on the ground who fought and died, poor bloody infantry, not remote politicians. At times I had to put the book down and think about what I had just read: indomitable courage, crass stupidity, the onslaught of the Chinese who took terrible casualties but charged on regardless of the cost. The battles must have been terrifying but British soldiers fought while others beat a hasty retreat.
For readers who have not served in the forces some may find the military jargon confusing. This does not detract from the book. Without these terms the writing would have lacked impact for readers of military history. The terminology is explained in the appendix. This is history presented without propaganda. A must read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 November 2010
I lived and worked in Korea for more than three years and was fortunate enough to meet many veterans of the Korean War. Their accounts of experiences of the war were both humbling and inspiring. Andrew Salmon has captured these testimonies - bringing out the horrors, the heroism, the terrible conditions, and the boredom of life on the front line - and merged them into a narrative which is gripping, deeply moving and frighteningly evocative. He has also not lost sight of the dark humour which helped the soldiers get through the war.

The Battle of the Imjin is remembered primarily for the Glosters. They take central stage in the book but Salmon also highlights the critical role played by other regiments in particular the Ulster Rifles, the Belgians and the Northumberland Fusiliers.

I've read a number of books on the Korean War (and there are more to come over the next year). This would be the first I would recommend.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 28 January 2011
An absolutely compelling read. Vividly recreates the hardship and the heroism through the voices of those who were there. An intensely rewarding and memorable book. I have several times attended reunions of veterans at the battleground but, surprisingly, this book made more real what took place. Andrew has filled in the peacetime hills and their placid surroundings with life and death.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 26 May 2010
I read quite a lot of military history and this is one of the best military history books I have read. I enjoyed Andrew Salmon's style of writing and his use of material - especially the mix of letters, diaries and interviews - which provides graphic accounts of soldiers'(of all ranks) experiences at the Battle of the Imjin River. The book also shows the strength of the British Army regimental system in the face of adversity. It was also interesting to read of the other regiments(the Northumberland Fusilers and the Royal Ulster Rifles) and the supporting Arms in the battle. Although his book was based on a different battle - the third battle of the Hook (in 1953)- may I make a plea for a publisher to re-issue D J Holland's novel "The Dead, the Dying and the Damned"?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 20 May 2009
From John Dyer President Reading and District B.K.V.A
There could be no better title for this book.Andrew has written it as if he had been there.
I recommend it 100% to all service personnel who were in Korea at that time also families and friends.Congratulations Andrew for a job well done.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 September 2014
A brilliantly drafted, inside account of the five days UN defensive campaign South of Korea's Imjin River, detailing the "Glorious Glosters' (sic) ultimately doomed stand on Hill 235 and their subsequent years in hostile captivity. A wonderful tribute to British resolution and courage. I looked forward to every opportunity to pick it up and read more. What a great film it would make!
However, I would earnestly recommend that prospective readers buy the paperback because the Kindle version cannot adequately screen the essential maps showing the topography and fluidity of troop movements throughout the action.
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